Current EcoTAP Courses

Current EcoTAP Courses

NOTE: Course listings here are for illustrative purposes only; they may differ slightly from the current academic schedule. Use WebAdvisor as your primary source for all course information when registering.

Architecture
Undergrad: ARCHT-434-01 (660) Eco: Building Energy
Grad: MARCH-634-01 (714) Eco: Building Energy
Instructor: Nathaniel Brown and Stet Sanborn

Undergrad: ARCHT-434-01 (661) Eco: Building Energy
Grad: MARCH-634-02 (715) Eco: Building Energy
Instructor: Nathaniel Brown and Stet Sanborn

ARCHT-434-01 (662) Eco: Building Energy
Instructor: TBA
This course provides a basic understanding of the dynamic thermal and visual environments created by the enclosure of space and of the phenomena that create these environments. This includes the basic principles of heat transfer and human comfort. Course content follows the traditional range of topics: heat transfer, human comfort, site concerns, solar geometry and shading, wind and ventilation, thermal behavior of materials, heating and cooling load analysis, climate design strategies, vernacular climate response, vision and light, natural light, and mechanical systems.

Architecture
Undergrad: ARCHT-540-03 (676) Eco: BT: The Green Toolbox
Grad: MARCH-640-03 (1751) Eco:BT: Green Toolbox
Instructor: Brendon Levitt
This seminar will present generative tools for eco-systemic design. Students will explore the potential of both analytical and phenomenological notions of building performance to shape architectural design. Significant contemporary buildings will serve as case studies for a phased analysis and re-design of their relationships to climate, heat, air, light, and energy. The class will focus on deriving sustainable building approaches from an understanding of human perception and response in a quick and generative fashion. Quantitative analysis using computer simulations will alternate with speculative explorations based on responses to theoretical texts, art films, and environmental artists' work. Both of these "right-brain" and "left-brain" modes of analysis will inform short design interventions. Successful completion of BT: Building Energy is strongly recommended, or equivalent by instructor approval.

Critical Studies
SCIMA-200-07 (767) Eco: California & Environment
Instructor: Christine Metzger
The environment is dynamic, complex, and always changing, and the study of it requires perspectives from geology, biology, chemistry, and physics, in addition to sociology, policy, economics, politics, the arts, and design. Local and global environmental issues are some of the most urgent and relevant in our society, including biodiversity, global climate change, water scarcity, resource limitations, pollution, energy sources, and sustainable design, among others. California provides a rich backdrop to study environmental science, from its location in the drought-stricken West to its active tectonic history. In this class, we will examine the major Earth systems - the lithosphere (rock cycle), atmosphere, biosphere, and hydrosphere - as they create and interact with our local environment. We will also evaluate media coverage of environmental issues and identify any weaknesses or strengths in presented statements, claims, solutions, and technologies.

Critical Studies
SCIMA-200-09 (768) Eco: Green Science
Instructor: TBA
When we say some thing or practice or process is "Green," what do we mean? Can we believe Green labels? For example, what about LEED ratings for buildings? Energy Star ratings for appliances? Is there such a thing as a process with no waste? Why are renewable energy schemes tied to fossil fuels, and can they be untied? Is there a criterion for examining the sustainability of processes such as making ethanol biofuel from corn? What about impacts of such processes outside the energy market, such as on the food market? Is local food always better? Is there truth to the notion that Native Americans have always lived lightly upon the land? Why was Easter Island abandoned? What is our responsibility to current and future generations? Is there a sustainable future in the face of unlimited population growth? Can technology save us? Was Malthus right? Through examinations of historical and current case studies and topics and hands-on assignments, we will investigate these and related topics, to find our way to an idea of sustainability based on sound science and ethical behavior.

Critical Studies
SCIMA-200-11 (770) Eco:NaturalHistory FieldStudy
Instructor: Carol Manahan
The study of nature through the practice of careful observation. The Bay Area's unique biogeography provides a diverse context to explore weather, climate, trees and plants, birds and other animals, and many other aspects of nature. Drawing on campus resources as well as regional parks, the class will introduce hands-on methods of natural history research, and provide opportunities to integrate the study of natural history with creative practice.

Critical Studies
SCIMA-200-12 (771) Eco:Intro Environmntl Science
Instructor: Carol Manahan
This course explores environmental science as both a system of knowledge and a hands-on approach to research. The class will engage a citizen-science phenology research project that traces the impacts of climate change on population and life cycles of plants, both on campus and on field trips. We will consider: biodiversity, ecology, air quality, water quality, pollution, and human impacts, and test the implications of our research for creative practice in art and design fields.

Fashion
FASHN-260-02 (350) Eco: Sustainability Seminar
Instructor: Lynda Grose
What are the social, cultural and environmental ramifications of our design decisions, and how can we mitigate or leapfrog them through our ideas? What is the role of design in the current ecological crisis? Students use their skills as designers to develop creative solutions to technical challenges in moving our industry and our society towards sustainability. More specifically students will review the ecological crisis and how fashion/textiles contribute to this crisis. Emerging interdisciplinary eco philosophies and methodologies will be reviewed, and students will be encouraged to develop their own eco design strategies. The content of the lectures will be explored through a series of lectures and tools coupled with class exercises, in which students will have the opportunity to test these methodologies and tools for themselves. Eco communication strategies and practicing eco design will also be covered through the lectures. Class time is structured around class exercises and lectures with a studio project as a final. Relevant field trips guest speakers and videos are integrated throughout the semester. A reader is provided. By the end of the course, students will have built their own source guide covering research and design methodologies, resources. organizations, and companies which can be referenced when practicing eco design, and participated in a collaborative studio project giving form to new ideas which emerged form the class.

Writing and Literature
WRLIT-204-01 (869) W:Eco:Lit Forms Across Genres
Instructor: Opal Palmer Adisa
Lit Forms Across Genres: Exploring Nature. This course will blur as well as implode the lines of demarcation between poetry, prose, essay and plays. While exploring the theme of nature, students will read works by writers of this subject as well as write in all four genres. The course will interrogate these literary divides, investigating the main objective for each. Additionally, we will explore the role of nature in our lives and our response and responsibility to our natural world. Some classes will be held at different sites in nature, off campus, but accessible.