Wkshp: Text as Image in Film

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FILMS-270

How does text become image? In film we have introductory titles, we have end credits, we even have subtitles, but how might language be used in cinema and on the web as a material in its own right? How has text moved beyond the inter-title of the silent cinema to have a discrete function of its own? How has text been used as a visual element in writing today and how might this inform our use of text in the time-based media of film and the web? We will look at the ideas behind Kenneth Goldsmith's "uncreativity as creative practice" in which the way artists navigate through this field of text and image is re-examined. We will begin our explorations at the turn of the 20th century, looking at the early film work of Duchamp and Edwin S. Porter and the concrete poems of Robert Herrick and Apollinaire. In looking at a selection of both contemporary and historical artists who have used test as in integral part of their visual practice - on the page and in time - we will look at historical figures such as Jean-Luc Godard, Len Lye, Hollis Frampton, Gertrude Stein, Joyce Wieland, Michael Snow and Yvonne Rainer. We will look at the typographical experiments of early 20th century poets as well and contemporary ideas behind Kenneth Goldsmith's "uncreativity as creative practice" in which the way one navigates through this field of text and image is re-examined. We will look at contemporary artists working with text in film, print and on the web: Tommy Becker, Sara Charlesworth, Fanny Howe, Billy Collins, Sue Fredrick, Laure Provost, Morgan Fisher, Shigeru Matsui, the work of the Conceptual algorithmic collective, Triple Canopy artists, and Claude Closky, to name a few. A selection of visiting artists: filmmakers, writers and web artists, will present their work and look at our work in progress. Students will explore ideas of text as image in the making of their own cinematic and textual pieces on paper, video, and film, on the web and in forms of their own choosing, in both on-going exercises and in a final project.