Featured Publications

Buoyant Ecologies: New Visions for San Francisco's Waterfront

Buoyant Ecologies: New Visions for San Francisco's Waterfront

Edited by Margaret Ikeda, Evan Jones, Adam Marcus
 

The Buoyant Ecologies research project begins with the premise that cities must accept the eventuality of rising water levels and actively develop new alternatives to conventional waterfront development. The research operates at the nexus of marine ecology and advanced digital fabrication techniques to seek new material approaches to man-made waterfront infrastructure.

The project began with a fall 2014 Integrated Studio taught by Adam Marcus, Margaret Ikeda, and Evan Jones at CCA's Architecture Division. Students designed floating expansions of Autodesk's state-of-the-art Pier 9 Workshop, and through their work explored ways for the underside of the vessel to engage with the Bay ecology in a beneficial way.

The studio's work was exhibited at the Autodesk Gallery in spring 2015, which is documented in this publication.

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The Petropolis of Tomorrow: SWITCHSCAPES

The Petropolis of Tomorrow: SWITCHSCAPES

Edited By Neeraj Bhatia
 

Produced by The Urban Works Agency at California College of the Arts, Switchscapes examines the confluence of energy and agricultural production in California's Central Valley and the subsequent tension over water resources.

Construct No. 2 Friction

Construct No. 2 Friction

Edited by Logan Kelly, Leila Khosrovi, Sara Schneider, and Nhat Vo
 

This second issue of the student-run annual CCA Architecture Department journal looks at the generative friction among forces that in turn transforms the creative process of architectural production beyond the norm, seen through student work produced at CCA during the year of 2012. Contributing to Construct No. 2 includes David Gissen, Mark Donohue, Thom Faulders, Nataly Gattegno, Dr. Irene Cheng and Mauricio Soto.

The Petropolis of Tomorrow: Rewriting Territories

The Petropolis of Tomorrow: Rewriting Territories

Edited By Neeraj Bhatia
 

The Petropolis of Tomorrow (Vol. 2.0) is a design and research project undertaken at the School of Architecture at California College of the Arts within The Urban Agency, in collaboration with Harvard’s Graduate School of Design, The South America Project (SAP), and  The Initiative for the Integration of Regional Infrastructure in South America (IIRSA).

The project examines new Petropolises -- cities formed from resource extraction -- associated with oil and gas extraction in Brazil. Volume 2.0 examines the role of pipeline infrastructures on local landscapes, settlements, and cultures.

Manhattan Atmospheres: Architecture, the Interior Environment, and Urban Crisis

Manhattan Atmospheres: Architecture, the Interior Environment, and Urban Crisis

By David Gissen
 

In Manhattan Atmospheres, David Gissen uncovers an alternative environmental history by examining the megastructural apartments, verdant corporate atria, enormous trading rooms, and mammoth museum galleries that were built in this era. These environments were integral to New York’s restructuring and also some of the most politicized fabrications of nature found in the city.

Behind the tinted and mirrored glass, the vaporous cooled and warmed atmospheres offered protection from pollution, stewarded urban greenery, and helped preserve precious cultural artifacts.

But, entangled with efforts to gentrify neighborhoods, the new settings served as a stage for demographic transformations and shifts in cultural concentration and enriched the overall corporatization of the city.

The Petropolis of Tomorrow

The Petropolis of Tomorrow

Edited by Neeraj Bhatia & Mary Casper
 

The Petropolis of Tomorrow is a design and research project, originally undertaken at Rice University that examines the relationship between resource extraction and urban development in order to extract new templates for sustainable urbanism.

Organized into three sections -- Archipelago Urbanism, Harvesting Urbanism, and Logistical Urbanism -- which consist of theoretical, technical, and photo articles as well as design proposals, The Petropolis of Tomorrow elucidates not only a vision for water-based urbanism of the floating frontier city but also speculates on new methodologies for integrating infrastructure, landscape, urbanism, and architecture within the larger spheres of economics, politics, and culture that implicate these disciplines.

Construct No. 1 Control Structure

Construct No. 1 Control Structure

Edited by Michael Barker and Digo Lima
 

This inaugural issue of the student-run annual CCA Architecture division journal explores the growing concepts, trends, questions, and concerns that technology is presenting in architecture through student work produced at CCA between the years 2010-11.

The journal also features intros by Ila Berman, Hugh Hynes, Brian Price, T. Jason Anderson, David Gissen, Nataly Gattegno, Dr. Mona El Khafif, Andrew Kudless, Michael Barker, and Digo Lima.

Refract House: California College of the Arts Architecture Studio Series

Refract House: California College of the Arts Architecture Studio Series

Edited by Ila Berman and Nataly Gattegno
 

Refract House explores the evolution of the California College of the Arts solar-powered house that competed in the 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon. The competition brief was to design, build, and operate a maximally energy-efficient, attractive, and comfortable solar-powered house.

Every detail was considered by the CCA faculty and student team -- from the landscaping, water recycling system, and solar collection arrays to the furniture and plateware.

CCA’s house was awarded first place in architecture and communications, second in engineering, and third overall.

Sustainable Skyscrapers

Sustainable Skyscrapers

Edited by Ila Berman and Nataly Gattegno
 

The skyscraper raises some of architecture’s biggest questions: Is it possible for a sense of community to develop among inhabitants of a vertical, stratified environment? What is the essence of a slender form?

CCA students and faculty provide several innovative answers in this latest installment in CCA’s Architecture Studio Series documents. It is designed by Mike Hu and Mai Ogiva, Graphic Design undergraduates in CCA’s Sputnik design studio, and edited by Ila Berman (former director of Architecture) and Nataly Gattegno (Architecture faculty).

Subnature: Architecture’s Other Environments

Subnature: Architecture’s Other Environments

by David Gissen
 

Much of today’s discussion about sustainable and green design revolves around efforts to clean or filter out environmental forces such as dust, mud, gas, smoke, debris, and weeds, which from its origins architecture has been engaged in both fighting and embracing.

In subnature, David Gissen, author of the critically acclaimed Big and Green, examines experimental work by today’s leading designers, scholars, philosophers, and biologists that rejects the idea that humans can somehow recreate a purely natural world, free of the untidy elements that actually constitute nature.

Each chapter provides an examination of a particular form of subnature and its actualization in contemporary design practice.

General Inquiries:
Email: architecture@cca.edu

Leah Kandel
Program Manager
Master of Architecture
Master of Advanced Architectural Design
lkandel@cca.edu
415.551.9245

Postal Address
Graduate Architecture Programs
California College of the Arts
1111 Eighth Street
San Francisco CA 94107-2247

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