CCA Events

Graduate Studies Lecture Series

Monday, January 27, 7:00 pm

Timken Lecture Hall, San Francisco Campus
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Free and open to the public
Info: architecture@cca.edu

Watch this lecture at the CCA channel on YouTube »

In December 1953, a 27-year-old Hugh Hefner published the first issue of Playboy magazine, featuring a provocatively clad Marilyn Monroe on the cover.

Today, the periodical’s reputation as an outlet for erotic fantasy remains unparalleled. Virtually unknown, however, is its role as a promoter of modern design and architecture in the 1950s and 1960s.

In these decades, as the architectural historian Beatriz Colomina will argue, the buxom Playmates adorning feature stories on such Modernist icons as Mies van der Rohe and Buckminster Fuller were actually of secondary interest to the magazine’s readers.

Beatriz Colomina is an internationally renowned architectural historian and theorist who has written extensively on questions of architecture and media.

She has taught at Princeton University since 1988 and is the founding director of its graduate program in media and modernity, which promotes the interdisciplinary study of forms of culture that came to prominence during the last century.

Presented by Master of Architecture Program

About the 2013-14 Graduate Studies Lecture Series

Each lecture is premised on the notion of "signal years." Each invited speaker will address a year of significance in his or her field or practice and link it to related transformations in the broader realms of politics and culture.

Charting a fascinating chronology over a wide range of disciplines, the series takes a close look at past moments that continue to resonate today.

The 2013-14 Architecture Lecture Series is funded by Grants for the Arts/San Francisco Hotel Tax Fund; Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP; Jensen Architects; John Marx / Form4; Kava Massih Architects; McCall Design Group; Perkins+Will; Pfau Long Architecture; SmithGroupJJR; BraytonHughes Design Studios; Cary Bernstein Architect; Harley Ellis Devereaux; Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects; Levy Design Partners; Stanley Saitowitz | Natoma Architects Inc.; Andrea Cochran Landscape Architecture; ARCH Art & Drafting Supply; Blasen Landscape Architecture; David Gissen and Rachel Schreiber; Donald MacDonald, Architects; Gregory Andreas & Judith Rosenberg; Johanna Spilman; TANNERHECHT Architecture; and Group i.

Group Exhibition

January 27–February 8

Isabelle Percy West Gallery, Oakland Campus
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Reception: Wednesday, January 29, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.

Presented by the Office of Special Programs

Monday, January 27, 3:15–3:45 pm

Nave, San Francisco Campus
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Room East 1
More info: Carol Pitts, cpitts@cca.edu

Alternative info session: Oakland campus from 11:15 to 11:45 a.m.

This three-week intensive course divides its time between the two magnificent jewels in Spain's crown: Madrid and Barcelona.

In addition to visiting numerous museums, monuments, cathedrals, and other sites of interest, participants are encouraged to explore the daily life and activities of these two remarkable cities.

Students develop a rich travelog, compiling drawings, painted studies, text, and photographs to be used as source material for more fully developed stories and imagery.

The instructor conducts periodic critiques and general discussions of studio-related practice.

Additionally, students visit contemporary studios, galleries, and museums of illustration and fine art and take two one-day trips to the towns of Segovia and Toledo.

View complete course information »

Presented by the Office of Special Programs

Monday, January 27, 11:15–11:45 am

B Building 1
More info: Carol Pitts, cpitts@cca.edu

Alternative info session: SF campus from 3:15 to 3:45 p.m.

This three-week intensive course divides its time between the two magnificent jewels in Spain's crown: Madrid and Barcelona.

In addition to visiting numerous museums, monuments, cathedrals, and other sites of interest, participants are encouraged to explore the daily life and activities of these two remarkable cities.

Students develop a rich travelog, compiling drawings, painted studies, text, and photographs to be used as source material for more fully developed stories and imagery.

The instructor conducts periodic critiques and general discussions of studio-related practice.

Additionally, students visit contemporary studios, galleries, and museums of illustration and fine art and take two one-day trips to the towns of Segovia and Toledo.

View complete course information »

January 27–February 1

Campus Center Galleries, San Francisco Campus
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Opening reception: Tues., Jan. 28, 3-4 p.m.
Free and open to the public

The Interior Design Program at California College of Art (CCA) provides an interdisciplinary design education that integrates critical artistic, technological, and material approaches into the practice of interior design.

The program philosophy departs from an understanding of the body in space, human scale, and perception. Students begin with the study of materials and space to create beautiful, functional, and captivating spaces.

They are challenged to be creative and visionary in order to meet the challenges and opportunities of the future -- to design with social and environmental issues in mind.

Their work reminds us that interior designers can produce ingenious and resourceful designs for materials as well as for spaces. Program faculty encourages the critical thinking necessary for an understanding of interior design as it relates to the accommodation and organization of human interactions, be it in the intimacy of the home, the open and collaborative workplace, or the public sphere of the city.

Adaptive reuse is a theme of the program, as we prepare designers for ethical and sustainable practice.

Juniors in the program have completed 6 studios, and the work presented here is exemplary of their curricular development and the identification of personal interests and creative passions and trajectories within the requirements that will shape their formation as designers in the next year and beyond the academic realm.

 

January 24–February 12

Oliver Art Center, 5212 Broadway Avenue (at College Avenue)
Opening Reception: February 5, 5:30-7:30
Hours: Mon.-Fri.,10-noon and 1-4 p.m.; Wed., 1-4 p.m.

Join us for the tenth annual Textiles Program student exhibition, Textilites, juried by Kate Nartker and Tali Weinberg.

Presented by the CCA Wattis Institute

January 23–March 29

Wattis Institute, San Francisco Campus
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Reception: Thursday, January 23, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Gallery hours: Tues.-Fri., noon-7 p.m.; Sat., noon-5 p.m.; closed Sun. and Mon.
Info: 415.355.9673 or wattis.org

Visit wattis.org for current information concerning related programs and events.

Hiller/Martin: Provisional Realities draws upon works by two artists of different generations, Susan Hiller and Daria Martin. Both were born in the United States (Martin was born and raised in San Francisco) and are now based in London.

The selection of works spans different moments in each artist’s practice. Martin works exclusively in 16-millimeter film, and Hiller operates across multiple mediums.

Martin’s film Soft Materials (2004) and Hiller’s installation Belshazzar’s Feast (1983-84) are the conceptual points of departure. Though they were created 20 years apart, both reveal a deep sensitivity to the fraught, yet potentially transformative, relationship between humans and technology.

The exhibition also approaches such expansive subjects as the unconscious, dreams, affect, feminism, and intimacy, as well as more unusual conditions such as telekinesis (as in Hiller’s Wild Talents [1997]) and mirror-touch synaesthesia (as in Martin’s Sensorium Tests [2012]).

The “provisional” of the title is meant to imply a specific kind of temporality, a conditional suspension of the present that favors a visionary way of thinking. Hiller and Martin’s respective artistic practices resist the security that a single, finite reality provides, and instead propose that parallel, alternative, and corrective realities can alter the way we perceive the past, present, and future.

Hiller/Martin: Provisional Realities is generously supported by the Kadist Art Foundation.

Founding support for CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts programs has been provided by Phyllis C. Wattis and Judy & Bill Timken. Generous support provided by Grants for the Arts/San Francisco Hotel Tax Fund and the CCA Wattis Institute Curator’s Forum.

Presented by the CCA Wattis Institute

January 23–March 29
John Baldessari, "Two Voided Books," 1990

Wattis Institute, San Francisco Campus
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Reception: Thursday, January 23, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Gallery hours: Tues.-Fri., noon-7 p.m.; Sat., noon-5 p.m.; closed Sun. and Mon.
Info: 415.355.9673 or wattis.org

Codex is a rumination on the idea that even though books have effectively been “flattened” in our digital age, we persist in expecting our screen-based reading experiences to imitate “traditional” books: by retaining page numbers, by simulating the turning of pages, et cetera.

Numerous artists throughout history have experimented with transitioning books from three-dimensional to two-dimensional and vice versa, and it continues to be a recurring motif in the most recent contemporary art.

Codex will be organized around myriad works -- a virtual library -- presented on a central wall. Some of the works take the known form of the artist’s book; others venture further afield.

Codex was conceived by Pierre Leguillon, an artist and book collector, during his 2013 residency in San Francisco. The title is a reference to the earliest known bound books, which appeared between the 1st and 2nd century AD. Replacing the scroll, codexes made it possible to more intuitively hierarchize the content of a text and allowed more immediate access to a desired page.

Visit wattis.org for current information concerning related programs and events.

Codex is made possible through a collaboration with Geneva University of Art and Design (HEAD – Genève), Switzerland, and generously supported by swissnex San Francisco. Codex has was originally presented at Live in Your Head, HEAD – Genève’s curatorial institute.

Founding support for CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts programs has been provided by Phyllis C. Wattis and Judy & Bill Timken. Generous support provided by Grants for the Arts/San Francisco Hotel Tax Fund and the CCA Wattis Institute Curator’s Forum.

 

Presented by the Architecture division

January 22–29

Nave, San Francisco Campus
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Free and open to the public
More info: architecture@cca.edu or 415.703.9562

The Tilt-Up Concrete Association has partnered with Andrew Kudless, associate professor of Architecture at California College of the Arts (CCA), and his students have fostered a laboratory for creativity and innovation in tilt-up concrete construction.

This exhibition represents CCA Architecture's contribution to the TCA's 2014 Competition, featuring student work from Kudless's fall 2013 Generative Design course.

 

January 22–28

Nave, San Francisco Campus
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Reception: Wed., Jan. 22, at 6:30 p.m.
Free and open to the public

More info: architecture@cca.edu 415.703.9562

Architecture Division Jury Prize Exhibition features the best work of all Architecture and Interior Design programs. Exhibition takes place throughout the Nave, including the alcove.

Group Exhibition

January 20–February 1

Campus Center Galleries, San Francisco Campus
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Reception: Tuesday, January 21, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.

A SOMArts Cultural Center graphic design exhibition

January 14–February 13

SOMArts Cultural Center | 934 Brannan Street | San Francisco

Opening event: Thursday, January 16, 6–9 p.m.
Gallery Hours: Tues.–Fri., Noon–7 p.m. & Sat., noon–5 p.m.
Free and open to the public

Visit the SOMArts website website for additional exhibition information »

All Possible Futures, curated by Graphic Design faculty member Jon Sueda, features speculative work created by contemporary graphic designers. It includes everything from self-generated provocations to experimental work created in parallel with client-based assignments to projects in which commissions have been tackled with a high level of autonomy and critical investigation.

The featured work reveals different levels of visibility and public-ness within the graphic design process. Some projects were made for clients and exist in a “real world” context, while others -- failed proposals, experiments, sketches, incomplete thoughts -- would otherwise be totally hidden and unnoticed.

All Possible Futures explores the potential of graphic design and celebrates a questioning of boundaries regarding concepts, processes, technologies, and form.

Participating graphic designers:

Abake; Appetite Engineers; Bob Aufuldish; Ludovic Balland; Rachel Berger; Peter Bil’ak; Catalogtree; Dexter Sinister; Daniel Eatock; Jan Evart, Julian Hagen, and Daniël Maarleveld; Experimental Jetset; Ed Fella; General Working Group; Hansje van Halem; David Karwan; Mr. Keedy; Na Kim; Jürg Lehni; Willem Henri Lucas; LUST; MacFadden and Thorpe; Karel Martens; Jeremy Mende and Bill Hsu; Metahaven; Mevis van Deursen; Moniker; Lesley Moore; Karl Nawrot & Walter Warton; Radim Pesko; Practise; Project Projects; PSY/OPS; ResearchCenteredDesign; Joel Stillman; Sulki and Min; Volume Inc.; and Zak Group

Visit the All Possible Futures website for additional information »

All Possible Futures is made possible by the generous support of swissnex San Francisco.

This program is supported as part of the Dutch Culture USA Program by the Consulate General of the Netherlands in New York.

The exhibition and accompanying publication were created with the generous help of a California College of the Arts faculty development grant.