CCA Events

Friday, February 7, 7:00 pm

Timken reception area

Please join us for the book launch of The Petropolis of Tomorrow (Actar / Architecture at Rice, 2014), edited by assistant professor Neeraj Bhatia and Mary Casper.

About The Petropolis of Tomorrow

In recent years, Brazil has discovered vast quantities of petroleum deep within its territorial waters, inciting the construction of a series of cities along its coast and in the ocean. We could term these developments as Petropolises, or cities formed from resource extraction.

The Petropolis of Tomorrow is a design and research project, originally undertaken at Rice University that examines the relationship between resource extraction and urban development in order to extract new templates for sustainable urbanism.

Organized into three sections: Archipelago Urbanism, Harvesting Urbanism, and Logistical Urbanism, which consist of theoretical, technical, and photo articles as well as design proposals, The Petropolis of Tomorrow elucidates not only a vision for water-based urbanism of the floating frontier city, but also speculates on new methodologies for integrating infrastructure, landscape, urbanism, and architecture within the larger spheres of economics, politics, and culture that implicate these disciplines.

The book contains articles by

Neeraj Bhatia, Luis Callejas, Mary Casper, Felipe Correa, Brian Davis, Farès el-Dahdah, Rania Ghosn, Carola Hein, Bárbara Loureiro, Clare Lyster, Geoff Manaugh, Alida C. Metcalf, Juliana Moura, Koen Olthuis, Albert Pope, Maya Przybylski, Rafico Ruiz, Mason White, Sarah Whiting

With photo essays by Garth Lenz, Peter Mettler, Alex Webb

Research/ Design Team: Alex Gregor, Joshua Herzstein, Libo Li, Joanna Luo, Bomin Park, Weijia Song, Peter Stone, Laura Williams, Alex Yuen

Related Events

Lecture by Lars Müller

 

 

Presented as part of the Writers Series (MFA Program in Writing)

Friday, February 7, 4:30 pm

Writers’ Studio, San Francisco Campus
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195 De Haro at 15th Street
Free and open to the public

More info: David Morini, dmorini@cca.edu or 415.551.9237

Natalie Baszile is a former fiction editor at The Cortland Review, and is a member of the San Francisco Writers’ Grotto.

An early version of Queen Sugar won the Hurston Wright College Writer’s Award, was a co-runner-up in the Faulkner Pirate’s Alley Novel-in-Progress competition, and excerpts were published in Cairn and ZYZZYVA.

She has had residencies at the Ragdale Foundation (where she was awarded the Sylvia Clare Brown fellowship), Virginia Center for the Arts, and Hedgebrook.

Baszile's nonfiction work has appeared in The RumpusMission at Tenth, and in The Best Women’s Travel Writing Volume 9.

She holds an MA in Afro-American Studies from UCLA, and is a graduate of Warren Wilson College’s MFA Program for Writers, where she was a Holden Minority Scholar.

Baszile grew up in Southern California and lives in San Francisco with her family.

Presented by the Office of Special Programs

Friday, February 7, 3:15–3:45 pm

Graduate Center, San Francisco Campus
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Room GC7
More info: Carol Pitts, cpitts@cca.edu

Open to all visual artists, this three-week studio course set in New York focuses on a discussion of interdisciplinary art practices with an emphasis on contemporary dialogues around painting.

View complete course information »

Group Exhibition

February 4–15

College Avenue Galleries, Oakland Campus
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Reception: Wednesday, February 5, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.

Group Exhibition — Glass and Mixed Media

February 4–8

College Avenue Galleries, Oakland Campus
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Reception: Wednesday, February 5, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.

Organized by CCA Career Development Office

February 3–15

A2 Cafe, Oakland Campus
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A touch of this, a touch of that . . . a résumé is never done. Come see what your fellow students have stirred together in this unique exhibition and learn some tips and tricks to cook up a refined résumé that best reflects you!

Work from Mariella Poli's Interdisciplinary Course

February 3–15

Campus Center Galleries, San Francisco Campus
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Reception: Tuesday, February 4, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.

Presented by the Queer Cultural Center (QCC), CCA, Openhouse, and the SF LGBT Community Center

February 1–March 15
Image by CCA student Tyler Jones-Powell

SF LGBT Community Center | 3rd Floor | 1800 Market Street | San Francisco

Free and open to the public
Opening reception: Saturday, February 8, 2014, 1–3 p.m.
Gallery hours: Mon.–Thurs., noon–10 p.m.; Friday, noon–6 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.–6 p.m.
More info: Rudy Lemcke, Communications Director, Queer Cultural Center, 415.626.8724, communications@queerculturalcenter.org

Alternative Futures, an exhibition of visionary architectural designs by students at California College of the Arts (CCA), will be on display on the third floor of  the San Francisco LGBT Community Center February 1–March 15, 2014.

A free, public reception is planned for Saturday, February 8, 1–3 p.m., where the public can interact with the exhibition curator, the student designers, and some of the individuals leading the 55 Laguna project.

In creating their designs, CCA Architecture students took their primary inspiration from 55 Laguna, an LGBT senior-housing project currently being developed in San Francisco. They were challenged to think about the specific history and needs of the LGBT senior community, and then asked to imagine new strategies for multi-unit housing in the city.

The exhibition is curated by Neal Schwartz AIA, associate professor of Architecture at CCA, as part of the ongoing Queer Conversations on Culture and the Arts (QCCA) program.

The program is a collaborative effort of QCC and CCA aimed at uplifting the profile of the queer arts movement by bringing together locally and nationally renowned queer artists, writers, filmmakers, and scholars to discuss a broad range of LGBT topics in humanities and the arts.

Work from John Zurier's Summer Study Abroad Course

January 28–February 8

College Avenue Galleries, Oakland Campus
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Reception: Wednesday, January 29, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.

Group Exhibition

January 27–February 8

Isabelle Percy West Gallery, Oakland Campus
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Reception: Wednesday, January 29, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.

January 24–February 12

Oliver Art Center, 5212 Broadway Avenue (at College Avenue)
Opening Reception: February 5, 5:30-7:30
Hours: Mon.-Fri.,10-noon and 1-4 p.m.; Wed., 1-4 p.m.

Join us for the tenth annual Textiles Program student exhibition, Textilites, juried by Kate Nartker and Tali Weinberg.

Presented by the CCA Wattis Institute

January 23–March 29

Wattis Institute, San Francisco Campus
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Reception: Thursday, January 23, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Gallery hours: Tues.-Fri., noon-7 p.m.; Sat., noon-5 p.m.; closed Sun. and Mon.
Info: 415.355.9673 or wattis.org

Visit wattis.org for current information concerning related programs and events.

Hiller/Martin: Provisional Realities draws upon works by two artists of different generations, Susan Hiller and Daria Martin. Both were born in the United States (Martin was born and raised in San Francisco) and are now based in London.

The selection of works spans different moments in each artist’s practice. Martin works exclusively in 16-millimeter film, and Hiller operates across multiple mediums.

Martin’s film Soft Materials (2004) and Hiller’s installation Belshazzar’s Feast (1983-84) are the conceptual points of departure. Though they were created 20 years apart, both reveal a deep sensitivity to the fraught, yet potentially transformative, relationship between humans and technology.

The exhibition also approaches such expansive subjects as the unconscious, dreams, affect, feminism, and intimacy, as well as more unusual conditions such as telekinesis (as in Hiller’s Wild Talents [1997]) and mirror-touch synaesthesia (as in Martin’s Sensorium Tests [2012]).

The “provisional” of the title is meant to imply a specific kind of temporality, a conditional suspension of the present that favors a visionary way of thinking. Hiller and Martin’s respective artistic practices resist the security that a single, finite reality provides, and instead propose that parallel, alternative, and corrective realities can alter the way we perceive the past, present, and future.

Hiller/Martin: Provisional Realities is generously supported by the Kadist Art Foundation.

Founding support for CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts programs has been provided by Phyllis C. Wattis and Judy & Bill Timken. Generous support provided by Grants for the Arts/San Francisco Hotel Tax Fund and the CCA Wattis Institute Curator’s Forum.

Presented by the CCA Wattis Institute

January 23–March 29
John Baldessari, "Two Voided Books," 1990

Wattis Institute, San Francisco Campus
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Reception: Thursday, January 23, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Gallery hours: Tues.-Fri., noon-7 p.m.; Sat., noon-5 p.m.; closed Sun. and Mon.
Info: 415.355.9673 or wattis.org

Codex is a rumination on the idea that even though books have effectively been “flattened” in our digital age, we persist in expecting our screen-based reading experiences to imitate “traditional” books: by retaining page numbers, by simulating the turning of pages, et cetera.

Numerous artists throughout history have experimented with transitioning books from three-dimensional to two-dimensional and vice versa, and it continues to be a recurring motif in the most recent contemporary art.

Codex will be organized around myriad works -- a virtual library -- presented on a central wall. Some of the works take the known form of the artist’s book; others venture further afield.

Codex was conceived by Pierre Leguillon, an artist and book collector, during his 2013 residency in San Francisco. The title is a reference to the earliest known bound books, which appeared between the 1st and 2nd century AD. Replacing the scroll, codexes made it possible to more intuitively hierarchize the content of a text and allowed more immediate access to a desired page.

Visit wattis.org for current information concerning related programs and events.

Codex is made possible through a collaboration with Geneva University of Art and Design (HEAD – Genève), Switzerland, and generously supported by swissnex San Francisco. Codex has was originally presented at Live in Your Head, HEAD – Genève’s curatorial institute.

Founding support for CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts programs has been provided by Phyllis C. Wattis and Judy & Bill Timken. Generous support provided by Grants for the Arts/San Francisco Hotel Tax Fund and the CCA Wattis Institute Curator’s Forum.

 

A SOMArts Cultural Center graphic design exhibition

January 14–February 13

SOMArts Cultural Center | 934 Brannan Street | San Francisco

Opening event: Thursday, January 16, 6–9 p.m.
Gallery Hours: Tues.–Fri., Noon–7 p.m. & Sat., noon–5 p.m.
Free and open to the public

Visit the SOMArts website website for additional exhibition information »

All Possible Futures, curated by Graphic Design faculty member Jon Sueda, features speculative work created by contemporary graphic designers. It includes everything from self-generated provocations to experimental work created in parallel with client-based assignments to projects in which commissions have been tackled with a high level of autonomy and critical investigation.

The featured work reveals different levels of visibility and public-ness within the graphic design process. Some projects were made for clients and exist in a “real world” context, while others -- failed proposals, experiments, sketches, incomplete thoughts -- would otherwise be totally hidden and unnoticed.

All Possible Futures explores the potential of graphic design and celebrates a questioning of boundaries regarding concepts, processes, technologies, and form.

Participating graphic designers:

Abake; Appetite Engineers; Bob Aufuldish; Ludovic Balland; Rachel Berger; Peter Bil’ak; Catalogtree; Dexter Sinister; Daniel Eatock; Jan Evart, Julian Hagen, and Daniël Maarleveld; Experimental Jetset; Ed Fella; General Working Group; Hansje van Halem; David Karwan; Mr. Keedy; Na Kim; Jürg Lehni; Willem Henri Lucas; LUST; MacFadden and Thorpe; Karel Martens; Jeremy Mende and Bill Hsu; Metahaven; Mevis van Deursen; Moniker; Lesley Moore; Karl Nawrot & Walter Warton; Radim Pesko; Practise; Project Projects; PSY/OPS; ResearchCenteredDesign; Joel Stillman; Sulki and Min; Volume Inc.; and Zak Group

Visit the All Possible Futures website for additional information »

All Possible Futures is made possible by the generous support of swissnex San Francisco.

This program is supported as part of the Dutch Culture USA Program by the Consulate General of the Netherlands in New York.

The exhibition and accompanying publication were created with the generous help of a California College of the Arts faculty development grant.