CCA Events

Sponsored by Visual Studies

Wednesday, February 19, 8:00–10:00 pm

Timken Lecture Hall, San Francisco Campus
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Free and open to the public
1111 Eighth Street (between Hooper & Irwin Streets)
More info: kfiss@cca.edu

Featuring director/activist Dagmar Schultz with special guests: writer Jewelle Gomez, CCA Film visiting artist Pratibha Parmar, DRAGA Design founder JB, and Gerlind Institute for Cultural Studies Director Dr. Marion Gerlind

Join us for a screening of Audre Lorde -- The Berlin Years 1984-1992 on the occasion of Audre Lorde’s 80th birthday!

Director and producer Dagmar Schultz has shown us the private Audre Lorde as well as the poet and the pragmatic activist, always engaging, always seeking out the truth. The film explores an untold chapter of Lorde’s life, a period in which she helped ignite the Afro-German Movement and made lasting contributions to the German political and cultural scene before and after the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Lorde encouraged Black German women to write and publish as a way of asserting their identities, rights, and culture in a society that isolated and silenced them, while she challenged white German women to acknowledge and constructively use their white privilege.

With testimony from Lorde’s colleagues, students, and friends, this film documents Lorde’s lasting legacy.

Schultz first met Lorde at the Women’s World Conference in Copenhagen in 1980. She arranged for Lorde to be invited as a guest professor at the John F. Kennedy Institute of North American Studies at the Free
University of Berlin in 1984. As director of publishing house Orlanda Frauenverlag, Schultz edited Macht und Sinnlichkeit: selected texts by Audre Lorde and Adrienne Rich. (Orlanda published further works by Lorde including a bilingual edition of 42 poems Lorde selected during her last summer in Berlin.)

 

In addition to CCA, this event is cosponsored by DRAGA design, Spectrum Queer Media, and The SF Women’s Building

Presented by Career Development

Wednesday, February 19, 5:00–7:30 pm

Florence and Leo B. Helzel Boardroom, San Francisco Campus
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More info: Stephanie Smith

Note: the second half of this program will take place in the Timken Lecture Hall from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

Please join Career Development for Res/Art, a two-part program on residencies that focuses on how to find, fund and fulfill these opportunities. 

The event begins with a workshop on fundraising, grant writing and research with Laura Schadler (MFAW '07) and Beatrice Thomas of the San Francisco Arts Commission

Following, there will be a presentation from local residency Directors: Drew Bennett of Facebook, Allyson Feeney of Project 387, Carrie Hott of Kala and Brian Karl of the Headlands Center for the Arts

Open to Fine Arts and Writing graduates & undergraduates

Space is limited, please RSVP to careers@cca.edu.

Presented by the Office of Special Programs

Wednesday, February 19, 11:15–11:45 am

B Building, Room 5
More info: Carol Pitts, cpitts@cca.edu 

Alternative info session with Lauren Elder: Tues., Feb. 18, 3:15-3:45 p.m.
San Francisco campus, West 1

This three-week intensive immerses students in the nature and culture of Ecuador, the first country to have adopted “rights for nature” in its national constitution.

In an area where ecotourism is giving rise to new economic prospects and challenges for village life, the course explores the relationship of community art and design to the natural environment.

The host, Larissa Marangoni, is an internationally known sculptor who has been organizing artist residencies in the coastal communities since 2007 through Franja Arte-Comunidad, the cultural arm of Aprofe, a distinguished public health provider.

View complete course information »

Devon Matlock, Olivia Shih and Hsia Ai Wang

February 18–22

College Avenue Galleries, Oakland Campus
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White is often a color of purity, cleanliness, and tranquility. White also causes unseen damage, both physical and psychological, with its ability to erase, sanitize, and idealize. This metal-based show seeks to expose the aftermath of white. 

 

Reception: Wednesday, February 19, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.

Olivia Krause, Caroline Weaver, Eva Gibeau and Sahara Johnson

February 18–22

College Avenue Galleries, Oakland Campus
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A group of people constructing themselves as art makers through the reflection of personal and social space and an exploration of materials.

Reception: Wednesday, February 19, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.

Group Exhibition

February 17–March 1

A2 Cafe, Oakland Campus
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Senior Exhibition — Painting/Drawing

February 17–22

Campus Center Galleries, San Francisco Campus
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Reception: Tuesday, February 18, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.

Senior Exhibition — Painting/Drawing

February 17–22

Campus Center Galleries, San Francisco Campus
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Reception: Tuesday, February 18, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.

Presented by International Student Affairs & Programs

February 17–22

Campus Center Galleries, San Francisco Campus
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Reception: Tues,, Feb. 18, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Free and open to the public
Hours: Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-7:30 p.m.
Info: isap@cca.edu or cca.edu/students/isap

Please join us for the spring 2014 International Student Exhibition that celebrates the art and experiences of our current international students as well as those CCA students who have studied abroad on exchange during the fall 2013 semester.

 

Molly Atkinson, Andie Bustillos, Dierdre Cook, Brianna Tadeo and Zoe Kravitz

February 17–22

Isabelle Percy West Gallery, Oakland Campus
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Reception: Wednesday, February 19, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.

Big Picture is an exhibition of work by female photographers, Molly Atkinson, Dierdre Cook, Brianna Tadeo and Zoe Kravitz, exploring the idea of a big picture both literally and metaphorically through painting and photography.

Presented by the Queer Cultural Center (QCC), CCA, Openhouse, and the SF LGBT Community Center

February 1–March 15
Image by CCA student Tyler Jones-Powell

SF LGBT Community Center | 3rd Floor | 1800 Market Street | San Francisco

Free and open to the public
Opening reception: Saturday, February 8, 2014, 1–3 p.m.
Gallery hours: Mon.–Thurs., noon–10 p.m.; Friday, noon–6 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.–6 p.m.
More info: Rudy Lemcke, Communications Director, Queer Cultural Center, 415.626.8724, communications@queerculturalcenter.org

Alternative Futures, an exhibition of visionary architectural designs by students at California College of the Arts (CCA), will be on display on the third floor of  the San Francisco LGBT Community Center February 1–March 15, 2014.

A free, public reception is planned for Saturday, February 8, 1–3 p.m., where the public can interact with the exhibition curator, the student designers, and some of the individuals leading the 55 Laguna project.

In creating their designs, CCA Architecture students took their primary inspiration from 55 Laguna, an LGBT senior-housing project currently being developed in San Francisco. They were challenged to think about the specific history and needs of the LGBT senior community, and then asked to imagine new strategies for multi-unit housing in the city.

The exhibition is curated by Neal Schwartz AIA, associate professor of Architecture at CCA, as part of the ongoing Queer Conversations on Culture and the Arts (QCCA) program.

The program is a collaborative effort of QCC and CCA aimed at uplifting the profile of the queer arts movement by bringing together locally and nationally renowned queer artists, writers, filmmakers, and scholars to discuss a broad range of LGBT topics in humanities and the arts.

Presented by the CCA Wattis Institute

January 23–March 29

Wattis Institute, San Francisco Campus
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Reception: Thursday, January 23, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Gallery hours: Tues.-Fri., noon-7 p.m.; Sat., noon-5 p.m.; closed Sun. and Mon.
Info: 415.355.9673 or wattis.org

Visit wattis.org for current information concerning related programs and events.

Hiller/Martin: Provisional Realities draws upon works by two artists of different generations, Susan Hiller and Daria Martin. Both were born in the United States (Martin was born and raised in San Francisco) and are now based in London.

The selection of works spans different moments in each artist’s practice. Martin works exclusively in 16-millimeter film, and Hiller operates across multiple mediums.

Martin’s film Soft Materials (2004) and Hiller’s installation Belshazzar’s Feast (1983-84) are the conceptual points of departure. Though they were created 20 years apart, both reveal a deep sensitivity to the fraught, yet potentially transformative, relationship between humans and technology.

The exhibition also approaches such expansive subjects as the unconscious, dreams, affect, feminism, and intimacy, as well as more unusual conditions such as telekinesis (as in Hiller’s Wild Talents [1997]) and mirror-touch synaesthesia (as in Martin’s Sensorium Tests [2012]).

The “provisional” of the title is meant to imply a specific kind of temporality, a conditional suspension of the present that favors a visionary way of thinking. Hiller and Martin’s respective artistic practices resist the security that a single, finite reality provides, and instead propose that parallel, alternative, and corrective realities can alter the way we perceive the past, present, and future.

Hiller/Martin: Provisional Realities is generously supported by the Kadist Art Foundation.

Founding support for CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts programs has been provided by Phyllis C. Wattis and Judy & Bill Timken. Generous support provided by Grants for the Arts/San Francisco Hotel Tax Fund and the CCA Wattis Institute Curator’s Forum.

Presented by the CCA Wattis Institute

January 23–March 29
John Baldessari, "Two Voided Books," 1990

Wattis Institute, San Francisco Campus
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Reception: Thursday, January 23, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Gallery hours: Tues.-Fri., noon-7 p.m.; Sat., noon-5 p.m.; closed Sun. and Mon.
Info: 415.355.9673 or wattis.org

Codex is a rumination on the idea that even though books have effectively been “flattened” in our digital age, we persist in expecting our screen-based reading experiences to imitate “traditional” books: by retaining page numbers, by simulating the turning of pages, et cetera.

Numerous artists throughout history have experimented with transitioning books from three-dimensional to two-dimensional and vice versa, and it continues to be a recurring motif in the most recent contemporary art.

Codex will be organized around myriad works -- a virtual library -- presented on a central wall. Some of the works take the known form of the artist’s book; others venture further afield.

Codex was conceived by Pierre Leguillon, an artist and book collector, during his 2013 residency in San Francisco. The title is a reference to the earliest known bound books, which appeared between the 1st and 2nd century AD. Replacing the scroll, codexes made it possible to more intuitively hierarchize the content of a text and allowed more immediate access to a desired page.

Visit wattis.org for current information concerning related programs and events.

Codex is made possible through a collaboration with Geneva University of Art and Design (HEAD – Genève), Switzerland, and generously supported by swissnex San Francisco. Codex has was originally presented at Live in Your Head, HEAD – Genève’s curatorial institute.

Founding support for CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts programs has been provided by Phyllis C. Wattis and Judy & Bill Timken. Generous support provided by Grants for the Arts/San Francisco Hotel Tax Fund and the CCA Wattis Institute Curator’s Forum.