Graduate Studies Events

April 16–30

Tecoah Bruce Gallery at the Oliver Art Center, Oakland Campus
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Opening Reception: Wed., April 16, 5-7 p.m. (Please RSVP by April 8 to rsvp@cca.edu or 510.594.3604.)
Free and open to the public
Hours: Weekdays: 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m.; weekends: noon-6 p.m.
Info: 415.551.9214 or jskloven@cca.edu

Please join CCA President Stephen Beal and Sharon and Barclay Simpson for the 27th Annual Barclay Simpson MFA Award Exhibition.

This is a juried exhibition of award-winning artworks by students in the Graduate Program in Fine Arts.

2014 Jurors

Kevin Chen (Curator, Intersection for the Arts) 
Apsara DiQuinzio (Curator, Phyllis C. Wattis MATRIX & UC Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive) 

View the 25 Years of the Barclay Simpson Award catalog to celebrate an entire generation of well-deserving graduating CCA artists. 

 

Presented by Painting/Drawing Program

Wednesday, April 16, 4:00–6:00 pm

Drawing Room (previously the PLAySPACE gallery)
Open to CCA community only

Info: Linda Geary at lgeary@cca.edu

The Open Critique Series is an experimental public forum designed to expand the critical dialogue and concerns of the Graduate Program in Fine Arts.

These critiques are led by current faculty and guest critics from the larger arts community including writers, curators, gallerists, and artists, among others.

In addition, we welcome and encourage active participation from all CCA students. It is our hope that through these critiques we will open up the conversation that occurs within the Fine Arts program to the larger community and simultaneously begin to engage the arts community in the critical dialogue that happens within the school.

This is an opportunity for students to get together for a critical review of work, and we encourage graduates, undergraduates, and faculty to attend.

Presented by the Graduate Program in Curatorial Practice

April 17–July 12
Ian Wallace, "At Work 1983," 1983. Graphite on paper, 48 x 69 in. Rennie Collection, Vancouver

Wattis Institute, San Francisco Campus
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360 Kansas Street (between 16th and 17th Streets)
Free and open to the public
Opening reception: Thursday, April 17, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Gallery hours:
Tues.-Fri., noon-7 p.m.; Sat. noon-5 p.m.; closed Sun. and Mon.
More info: 415.355.9673, wattis.org

The Graduate Program in Curatorial Practice at California College of the Arts presents the exhibition Many Places at Once.

Decades after the "post-studio" turn announced by Minimalism and Conceptual art in the 1960s, Many Places at Once reconsiders the place of artistic production in our era of creative industries and flexible labor.

Featuring new commissions and existing works by seven international artists, the exhibition presents artworks that call attention to the nuanced circumstances that characterize the economic, social, and technological conditions in which artists work today:

Martin Soto Climent
Rana Hamadeh
Cinthia Marcelle
William Powhida
Li Ran
Ian Wallace

and Real Time and Space

Taken individually, each contemporary work presents a site: a hotel, a notebook, an archive, a network, an event, or a theatrical stage. Together they constitute the “many places” -- physical and conceptual -- that “at once” constitute a reimagined artist’s studio.

See other year-end celebratory events »

Presented by the Graduate Program in Design

Thursday, April 17, 11:30 am

Graduate Center, San Francisco Campus
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Free and open to the public
Graduate Center, Room GC4

RSVP to Leslie Carol Roberts, lroberts2@cca.edu

Thackara needs no introduction -- described as a "design guru, critic, and business provocateur" by Fast Company, his brilliant writing about the role design plays across civil society is followed around the world via his many books and Design Observer blog. 

Bill Moggridge urged all designers to keep a copy of Thackara's book, In the Bubble: Designing in a Complex World, close at hand, to "remind you of all the new possibilities." 

Talk Highlights: What Makes a Change Lab?

To effect system-level change in health, energy, food, or mobility, a first step is often to reframe the question. In health, for example, 95 percent of person-to-person care happens outside the bio-medical system -- and how do you innovate there?

In cities, too: smart systems are useful-- but what makes cities truly smart are its citizens as they innovate new sharing platforms. Or think about mobility: the big changes under way concerns new social practices, not vehicles -- and how do you innovate those?

A second requirement in system change is that a variety of experiments, changes, and disruptions are choreographed through time. Many of these a experiments are already happening; grassroots innovation is emerging wherever people seek new ways to meet their daily life needs.

So the question becomes: What are the best ways to support, connect, and amplify these experiments?

Presented as part of the Writers Series (MFA Program in Writing)

Thursday, April 17, 4:30–5:30 pm

Writers’ Studio, San Francisco Campus
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195 De Haro at 15th Street
Free and open to the public

More info: David Morini, dmorini@cca.edu or 415.551.9237

Akhil Sharma’s first novel, An Obedient Father, won the PEN/Hemingway Award. W.W. Norton will be re-releasing the paperback in April 2014. His writing has appeared in the New Yorker, among other publications. 

Granta has chosen him for their once-a-decade Best Young American Novelists list. He lives in New York.

Presented by CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts

Friday, April 18, 7:00–8:00 pm
Rana Hamadeh, "Al Karantina," 2013. Lecture-performance; cabinet: 67 x 19 ½ x 63 in. Commissioned for "The Magic of The State at Beirut," 2013. [Courtesy the artist]

360 Kansas Street (between 16th and 17th Streets)

Free and open to the public
More info: Rita Souther, rsouther@cca.edu

Rana Hamadeh is a performance and visual artist currently based in Rotterdam. Interested in a curatorial approach within her artistic practice, she works on long-term discursive research-based projects that involve different levels of collaborations.

The collaborations are presented to the public in the form of lecture-performances, audio/text-based installations, mind maps, and public/documented conversations.

In 2011 Hamadeh initiated Alien Encounters, a long-term research project that serves an umbrella for a continuously growing archive of performance/theatrical works, cartographic/choreographic projects, and different sorts of artistic and theoretical gestures, ideas, collaborations, etc.

Initially inspired by Sun Ra's film Space is the Place (1974), which proposes an African American exodus toward outer space in response to racial injustice, Alien Encounters aims at reaching such a gesture of moving outward in terms of contemporary conditions of injustice that inhabit, embody, and traverse us today.

Part of Alien Encounters, Hamadeh's lecture-performance "Al Karantina," presented at the Wattis Institute as part of the Many Places At Once public program, weaves original photographs, documents, historical events, personal encounters, and fictions in a web of associations to question notions of contagion and resistance, citizenship, and alienness.

Her work "Al Karantina" also has a sculptural component: a wooden cabinet in which the artist's archives and documents are displayed, which are then activated during her lecture-performance.

Founding support for CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts programs has been provided by Phyllis C. Wattis and Judy & Bill Timken. Generous support provided by Grants for the Arts/San Francisco Hotel Tax Fund and the Curator’s Forum.

Presented by the MFA Program in Writing

Friday, April 18, 7:00 pm

Timken Lecture Hall, San Francisco Campus
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1111 Eighth Street (at 16th and Wisconsin)
Free and open to the public
More info: dmorini@cca.edu
or 415.551.9237

Word. World. is the culminating event of the MFA Program in Writing at California College of the Arts that features graduating students reading from their thesis.

An evening of poetry, prose, and writings in between, this night is also a community celebration as these students enter a new phase of their writing careers.

Featured Writers

Patrick C. VanNevel
Tanika Thacker
Nora Toomey
Candace Elise Hoes
Dahlia Baeshen

See other year-end celebratory events »

Presented by the MFA Program in Writing

Friday, April 25, 7:00 pm

Timken Lecture Hall, San Francisco Campus
San Francisco campus map
Get Directions

1111 Eighth Street (at 16th and Wisconsin)
Free and open to the public
More info: dmorini@cca.edu
or 415.551.9237

Word. World. is the culminating event of the MFA Program in Writing at California College of the Arts that features graduating students reading from their thesis.

An evening of poetry, prose, and writings in between, this night is also a community celebration as these students enter a new phase of their writing careers.

 

Featured Writers

Shandy Walton
Kat A. Croswell
Zane Hawley
Felicia M. Hayes
Sam Cavedon

See other year-end celebratory events »

 

Presented by the Graduate Program in Visual and Critical Studies

Saturday, April 26, 12:30–5:30 pm

Timken Lecture Hall, San Francisco Campus
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Free and open to the public
More info: Kate Angelo, kangelo@cca.edu

The Graduate Program in Visual and Critical Studies (VCS) trains students to deeply engage visual culture by refining written and oral presentation abilities, sharpening critical faculties, fostering research skills, expanding methodological options, and furthering the development of both creative and traditional modes of critical expression.

This year’s cohort presents innovative and transformative research in the field of visual studies at the program’s capstone event, the 2014 Spring Symposium.

Learn more bout the 2014 VCS graduate cohort »

In this day-long public symposium, graduate candidates will interrogate the politics and poetics of visual culture.

Learn more about the 2014 VCS Spring Symposium »

 

 

Saturday, April 26, 7:00 pm

Timken Lecture Hall, San Francisco Campus
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Free and open to the public
Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

 

Note: This event was originally scheduled for Thursday, April 24.

Anne Carson, who frequently grounds her highly contemporary writing in the literature of the Greek classics, will address the date 610 B.C.E.

According to scholars, that year represented the height of the powers of the ancient Greek poet Stesichorus, on whose fragments she has depended for several of her works.

Writing in a unique style at a moment of transition from epic to lyric forms, Stesichorus offers a compelling model for Carson’s own multifarious and irreverent writing, which encompasses translations, poems, novels, operas, essays, and sometimes, seemingly, all of these at once.

Anne Carson is a poet, translator, essayist and professor of classics, although her work evades most conventional categories.

Since 1986 she has published 18 books, including her inventive verse novels Autobiography of Red (1998) and red doc> (2013), which repurpose the Greek myth of the winged monster Geryon to tell contemporary stories of sexual longing and the perils of adulthood.

Presented by the MFA Program in Writing

About the 2013-14 Graduate Studies Lecture Series

Each lecture is premised on the notion of "signal years." Each invited speaker will address a year of significance in his or her field or practice and link it to related transformations in the broader realms of politics and culture.

Charting a fascinating chronology over a wide range of disciplines, the series takes a close look at past moments that continue to resonate today.

Generous support for CCA public programs in San Francisco has been provided by Grants for the Arts/San Francisco Hotel Tax Fund.

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