Lecture Series Events

Presented by CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts

Friday, April 18, 7:00–8:00 pm
Rana Hamadeh, "Al Karantina," 2013. Lecture-performance; cabinet: 67 x 19 ½ x 63 in. Commissioned for "The Magic of The State at Beirut," 2013. [Courtesy the artist]

360 Kansas Street (between 16th and 17th Streets)

Free and open to the public
More info: Rita Souther, rsouther@cca.edu

Rana Hamadeh is a performance and visual artist currently based in Rotterdam. Interested in a curatorial approach within her artistic practice, she works on long-term discursive research-based projects that involve different levels of collaborations.

The collaborations are presented to the public in the form of lecture-performances, audio/text-based installations, mind maps, and public/documented conversations.

In 2011 Hamadeh initiated Alien Encounters, a long-term research project that serves an umbrella for a continuously growing archive of performance/theatrical works, cartographic/choreographic projects, and different sorts of artistic and theoretical gestures, ideas, collaborations, etc.

Initially inspired by Sun Ra's film Space is the Place (1974), which proposes an African American exodus toward outer space in response to racial injustice, Alien Encounters aims at reaching such a gesture of moving outward in terms of contemporary conditions of injustice that inhabit, embody, and traverse us today.

Part of Alien Encounters, Hamadeh's lecture-performance "Al Karantina," presented at the Wattis Institute as part of the Many Places At Once public program, weaves original photographs, documents, historical events, personal encounters, and fictions in a web of associations to question notions of contagion and resistance, citizenship, and alienness.

Her work "Al Karantina" also has a sculptural component: a wooden cabinet in which the artist's archives and documents are displayed, which are then activated during her lecture-performance.

Founding support for CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts programs has been provided by Phyllis C. Wattis and Judy & Bill Timken. Generous support provided by Grants for the Arts/San Francisco Hotel Tax Fund and the Curator’s Forum.

Presented by the Fine Arts division

Monday, April 21, 9:30–10:30 am
"More Heads," 2013 [photo: Wynne Greenwood]

Timken Lecture Hall, San Francisco Campus
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Free and open to the CCA community only
More info: Molly Mitchell, mmitchell@cca.edu

Wynne Greenwood is a queer feminist artist from Seattle who studied at Rutgers University and received her MFA from Bard College.

She has served as a teaching artist for the nonprofit Reel Grrls, whose mission it is to empower girls ages 9-21 from diverse communities about video and filmmaking as well as issues of representation and media justice through classes and workshops.

Greenwood has lectured and led workshops as a visiting artist at 19 different schools, universities, and museums since the year 2000. She has an extensive background practicing and teaching interdisciplinary art, multimedia installation, performance, analog and digital video, music recording, and music video.

Greenwood's practice puts sculpture into shifting roles, from prop to set to subject. She achieved national acclaim (and a dedicated queer feminist cult following) for her multimedia performance project Tracy + The Plastics, a band in which she plays all three band members simultaneously through video projections she interacts with onstage.

Other recent projects involve putting sculptures in conversation with one another through live performance and video projection in the gallery. Looking at the increasingly complex relationships between objects (especially smart phones, laptops, and tablets) and cultures, and the stage as a place of responsibility and a space to share power, Greenwood describes her practice as one of culture-healing, of examining dynamics of power in contemporary media and complicating processes of identity production.

She's had over 25 solo exhibitions and performances and tours throughout the United States and Europe.

Architecture Lecture Series

Monday, April 21, 7:00 pm

Timken Lecture Hall, San Francisco Campus
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Free and open to the public
Info: 415.703.9562 or architecture@cca.edu

LCLA operates at the intersection of architecture, landscape, and urbanism, oriented toward new forms of engagement with the public realm through territorial operations. It was founded in 2011 by Luis Callejas, and today operates out of offices in Medellín, Colombia, and Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Having obtained diverse recognition in multiple public space design competitions, Callejas was awarded the Architectural League of New York Prize for Young Architects in 2013 and was selected as one of the world’s 10 best young practices by the Iakov Chernikhov International Foundation in 2010.

In 2010, Callejas, together with Edgar Mazo and Sebastian Mejia as Paisajes Emergentes, completed the aquatic centre for the XI South American games, a 20,000-square-meter open-air complex of swimming pools and public space in Medellin, Colombia.

In 2011 Callejas, in association with E Mazo, S. Mejia, and Manuel Villa, completed the renovation of El Campin, the main soccer stadium in Colombia for the 2012 sub20 world cup. Both projects were commissioned through open international competitions.

Callejas is the author of Pamphlet Architecture 33 (Princeton Architectural Press). The competition for PA33 asked previous authors in the series to nominate the architects and theorists whose work represents the most exciting design and research in the field today.

Callejas is a faculty member of Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design, where he teaches graduate-level design studios and seminars as part of the landscape architecture department.

The 2013-14 Architecture Lecture Series is funded by Grants for the Arts/San Francisco Hotel Tax Fund; Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP; Jensen Architects; John Marx / Form4; Kava Massih Architects; McCall Design Group; Perkins+Will; Pfau Long Architecture; SmithGroupJJR; BraytonHughes Design Studios; Cary Bernstein Architect; Harley Ellis Devereaux; Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects; Levy Design Partners; Stanley Saitowitz | Natoma Architects Inc.; Andrea Cochran Landscape Architecture; ARCH Art & Drafting Supply; Blasen Landscape Architecture; David Gissen and Rachel Schreiber; Donald MacDonald, Architects; Gregory Andreas & Judith Rosenberg; Johanna Spilman; TANNERHECHT Architecture; and Group i.

Presented by the Fine Arts division

Tuesday, April 22, 11:30 am–12:30 pm
"An Unkindess," 2013, installation view The Corcoran Gallery of Art [Photo: Paul Bothwell]

Timken Lecture Hall, San Francisco Campus
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Free and open to the CCA community only
More info: Molly Mitchell, mmitchell@cca.edu

Mia Feuer is a Canadian sculptor. Her work uses various processes and materials to create immersive works that investigate the tensions of violated spaces, creating the illusion of failed infrastructures and destroyed landscapes as a provocation toward the reimagination of the physical world.

Immersing herself in politically charged, complicated, and conflicted places fuels her creative research. She has spent time in occupied Palestine, in Egypt during the 2011 revolutions, at the Suez Canal, the Alberta Tar Sands, and the Arctic Circle. In her words, all places that share a common expression of extreme energy extraction and consumption.

Feuer creates immersive, metaphorical, sculptural environments that combine personal moments and memories of these sites with critical perspectives on the myriad forces at work in these landscapes.

A recent exhibition at the Corcoran Museum included a synthetic black hockey rink made of petroleum that museum visitors could skate on. She has presented her work in 14 solo exhibitions since 2006 and has received nearly 40 awards, grants, fellowships, and residencies around the world. 

Feuer holds a BFA in sculpture from University of Manitoba and an MFA in sculpture and extended media from Virginia Commonwealth University. Since 2012 she has served as a full-time assistant professor of sculpture and foundations coordinator at George Mason University.

She's currently a visiting faculty member at the Banff Center for Contemporary Art. Feuer lives in Washington DC.

Presented by the Jewelry / Metal Arts Program

Tuesday, April 22, 7:00–8:30 pm
Photo: Conor Vella

Nahl Hall, Oakland Campus
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Free and open to the public
More info: Tony Esola,
tesola@cca.edu

Ruudt Peters is a Dutch jeweler and sculptor. As a highly energetic person, we can find him everywhere. Teaching at Rietveld Academy in Amsterdam, Konstfack in Stockholm, Alchemia in Florence. Traveling in China, India, Mexico, the Old and New World, he finds new impulses for his ideas.

However peculiar, radical, and extravagant his ideas are, he always manages to present them perfectly, convincingly.

Peters will lead a workshop in addition to his lecture.

 

Presented by the Fine Arts division

Wednesday, April 23, 12:30–1:30 pm
"Untitled" (Black and White Sweater II), sweater, plaster, stucco, 21”x20”x13”, 2013 [Photo: Adam Reich]

Timken Lecture Hall, San Francisco Campus
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Free and open to the CCA community only
More info: Molly Mitchell, mmitchell@cca.edu

Jennifer Cohen is a sculptor from New York who has a background as a professionally trained Balanchine dancer.

She has presented her work in over 30 solo and group exhibitions in the United States and abroad. A dedicated teacher as well as artist, she believes in the importance and value of art education in developing empathetic, community-oriented, curious, and questioning citizens.

Her teaching experience encompasses a broad range from first-year students to graduate students, and traditional sculpture techniques to computer-aided digital fabrication.

Cohen's object-oriented, studio-based sculpture practice explores the intersection between abstraction and figuration, inspired by both physical memories and theoretical concerns of choreography.

The stillness of her sculptures isolate the performative act into a single gesture, aiming to echo the moment where an extended body becomes a pure form. Within this intuitive process of making, she considers the possibility of physical empathy, of energy stored in matter, of visualizing and materializing human gestures, and how sculptural forms might help us to physically feel.

Cohen has served as an adjunct professor in sculpture at School of the Visual Arts for seven years in addition to numerous other courses at Parsons, NYU, Brooklyn College, and Yale University since 2002.

She earned her bachelor of arts in rhetoric from Bates College, a post-baccalaureate certificate from SAIC, and her MFA from the Yale University Sculpture program.

Presented by the Writing and Literature Program

Wednesday, April 23, 7:30–9:00 pm

Nahl Hall, Oakland Campus
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Free and open to the public
Contact: 510.597.3709 or humblepie@cca.edu

HearSay is the monthly literary reading series sponsored by the editorial staff of Humble Pie and the Writing and Literature Program. It features CCA students and established Bay Area writers.

All HearSay events include delicious refreshments!

Visit us at humblepiemag.com for literary and visual art from past years, and to confirm dates and times.

Saturday, April 26, 7:00 pm

Timken Lecture Hall, San Francisco Campus
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Free and open to the public
Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

 

Note: This event was originally scheduled for Thursday, April 24.

Anne Carson, who frequently grounds her highly contemporary writing in the literature of the Greek classics, will address the date 610 B.C.E.

According to scholars, that year represented the height of the powers of the ancient Greek poet Stesichorus, on whose fragments she has depended for several of her works.

Writing in a unique style at a moment of transition from epic to lyric forms, Stesichorus offers a compelling model for Carson’s own multifarious and irreverent writing, which encompasses translations, poems, novels, operas, essays, and sometimes, seemingly, all of these at once.

Anne Carson is a poet, translator, essayist and professor of classics, although her work evades most conventional categories.

Since 1986 she has published 18 books, including her inventive verse novels Autobiography of Red (1998) and red doc> (2013), which repurpose the Greek myth of the winged monster Geryon to tell contemporary stories of sexual longing and the perils of adulthood.

Presented by the MFA Program in Writing

About the 2013-14 Graduate Studies Lecture Series

Each lecture is premised on the notion of "signal years." Each invited speaker will address a year of significance in his or her field or practice and link it to related transformations in the broader realms of politics and culture.

Charting a fascinating chronology over a wide range of disciplines, the series takes a close look at past moments that continue to resonate today.

Generous support for CCA public programs in San Francisco has been provided by Grants for the Arts/San Francisco Hotel Tax Fund.

Copresented by the Faculty of Color Research Alliance and Queer Conversations on Culture and the Arts

Tuesday, April 29, 7:00–9:00 pm

Timken Lecture Hall, San Francisco Campus
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Free and open to the public

Isaac Julien is one of the most prominent documentary and feature filmmakers in Britain. Currently, he has a film installation in the exhibition Ten Thousand Waves at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

In 2002, he received San Francisco's Frameline Award for his contribution to LGBT film. In 2001 he was nomnated for the Turner Prize for his films The Long Road to Mazatlan (1999) and Vagabondia (2000), made in collaboration with and choreographed by Javier de Frutos,
respectively.

Earlier works include Frantz Fanon: Black Skin, White Mask (1996), Young Soul Rebels (1991), which was awarded the Semaine de Ia Critique Prize at the Cannes Film Festival the same year, and the acclaimed poetic documentary Looking for Langston (1989).

Copresented by the Queer Conversations on Culture and the Arts, an alliance of the Queer Cultural Center (QCC) and programs at California College of the Arts (CCA) in Visual and Critical Studies and Architecture.

HearSay Reading Series

Wednesday, May 7, 7:30–8:45 pm

A2 Cafe, Oakland Campus
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Free and open to the public
Contact: 510.597.3709 or humblepie@cca.edu

HearSay is the monthly literary reading series sponsored by the editorial staff of Humble Pie and the Writing and Literature Program. It features CCA students and established Bay Area writers.

All HearSay events include delicious refreshments!

Visit us at humblepiemag.com for literary and visual art from past years, and to confirm dates and times.