2011 Fashion Design Senior Class a Run(a)way Success!

2011 Fashion Design Senior Class

Patricia Lucia Arroyo

Collection: Ardour
Awards: Surface Magazine Emerging Talent Award; scholarship/internship with Nicole Miller)
(parroyo@cca.edu)
Ardour stems from past memories and experiences of the ocean. The sea translates into a stylized form of self-expression through garments that suggest a sophistication as explored in the seaming, leathers, suedes, hardware, and jewelry techniques.

Patricia Arroyo was born and raised in Houston. Her immigrant parents raised her to value hard work. She was drawn to fashion design after her aunt showed her the power of the sewing machine. From a young age she used fashion as an art form—printing, cutting, sewing garments to convey a sense of style without the need for verbal communication. She is inspired by various genres of alternative music that add depth to her creativity in the world of fashion design.

Alexandra Canter

Collection: All Tomorrow’s Parties
(acanter@cca.edu)
All Tomorrow's Parties is an eveningwear collection inspired by the elegance and femininity of old Hollywood glamour and laced with femme fatale edginess. Rich cascading silks, bold color, and brilliant, ruffled shine evoke the leading lady in the wearer.

Alexandra was born in New York and grew up in Redding, Connecticut. Inspired by her family's creative background, she started filling up sketchbooks of evening gowns and created her own paper dolls at a young age. In high school, Alexandra enrolled in summer courses at Parsons the New School for Design, Fashion Institute of Technology (State University of New York), and Otis College of Art and Design to further pursue her love of art and design. She has interned with such designers as Isabel Toledo and Erin Fetherston.

Alexandra chose CCA for its rigorous curriculum, diverse student body and intimate class size. Her desire to travel has inspired her to live in New York, Los Angeles, and San Francisco. She looks forward to designing for feminine, romantic, and elegant women.

Marcela Lucía Cole

Collection: Amor y Guerra
(mcole@cca.edu)
Amor y Guerra is about merging the past with the present—exposing the beauty in disaster. She was initially inspired by photographs of her parents during the 70s while in Nicaragua, who were forced to leave because of civil war. Marcela has combined nostalgia with her present life.

Artistically always drawn to Japanese art, she has brought the lightness, volume, and simplicity of these cultural designs and juxtaposed it with a fierce, urban scene, paying tribute to growing up in San Francisco as a former graphic design student, she has always been passionate about print and pattern, which was a key aspect to the collection.

Marcela credits CCA graduate printmaker Will Manville and her sister, Renee Camila, for their collaboration in this collection.

Sloane Groenveld

Collection: Geodesic Psyco-Babble
(sloanegroenveld@gmail.com)
This collection is based on a notion of a straight line to curved spaces; it uses an esoteric language to give an impression of plausibility through mystification, misdirection, and confusion.

The California-born designer developed a love for illustration at a very young age. In high school she would redraw the Vogue gowns in the editorial pages. Having been to Europe, Dutch design has influenced her contemporary vision for fashion design. She takes the familiar and turns it into something unexplored and innovative.

Anna Huang

Collection: Nympheas
(ahuang@cca.edu)
By mixing silk chiffon and wool roving with a wet-felting technique, Nympheas investigates the blending of soft colors inspired by Impressionist painter Claude Monet’s paintings of the water lilies, conveying a sense of relaxed femininity.

Born in San Francisco, Anna grew up between the Bay Area and Taiwan. She spent much of her youth painting, drawing, knitting, dressing up her baby cousin and spent extensive amounts of time in museums. She decided to pursue a career in fashion design because it combined her passions to create art and influence others with her opinions.

Anna loves the Impressionist era, Gothic cathedrals, black-and-white photography, antiques, perfume bottles, Chinese literature, traveling, hosting dinner parties, and making others laugh. In the future, she aspires to continue designing clothes for eclectic and quirky young women and perhaps finding some children on whom she can put pretty bows!

Micah Landworth

Collection: Motorcade
(dooleenoted@gmail.com)
This collection takes influence from sportswear, dive gear, formal dress, and the body itself. It is about movement, figuratively and aesthetically, and removing customary hard lines in favor of more ergonomic tailoring. Today's gentleman isn't afraid of individuality; he uses dress as a window into personality and lifestyle. Incorporating modern sportswear fabrics with classic wovens, textured neutrals, burnt pop colors, and neon in streamlined silhouettes, these garments are vehicles for sporty gentlemen.

Micah, a dreamer, designer, and a maker, is from Southern California. He has one foot in the past and the other in the future. His designs stand somewhere in between. Micah is inspired by rusty buildings, aerodynamics, old chipped paint, nature, machines, clean lines, and things that convey a story (or are designed for a specific use).

"The most challenging part is trying to remember what I forgot to remember I've already forgotten without forgetting what I'm remembering, and then turning that into clothes."

[Editor's note: Micah Landworth did not participate in the 2011 Annual Fashion Show]

Mariana Moreno-Gonzalez

Collection: Hollow Grounds
(madibell8n8@gmail.com)
Raised in Berkeley, Mariana was inspired by the organic shapes of the tide pools on a beach in Half Moon Bay. One especially serene place has rock structures filled with intricate patterns of holes, which mesmerized her because of the depth of shadow and light throughout the land. Fashion, to Mariana, is like the tide pools: a way of exposing oneself through garments, allowing the fabric to flow with the body, and balancing what can be seen and not seen.

Aside from being an art form, she finds fashion design an external representation of what we love about life or about ourselves. She believes the beauty of fashion is the controlling of every aspect of this representation—from the way it feels on the bodies to the way the designer directs it to move through the air.

When designing garments, Mariana believes that the clothes should work with the body, allowing movement to bring the fabric alive and feel comfortable on those who wear it. Bodies are her canvas; fabrics are her medium; and self-expression is her subject.

Jacky Safer

Collection: Patina
(jlsafer@yahoo.com)
Patina is inspired by the oxidization of metal and the wear of time—the idea of falling a part and trying to hold yourself together. Despite everything we go through in life, we put up wall after wall, like layers of paint that crack and chip over time. Then we peel it off like wallpaper, trying to find peace and happiness again within ourselves, but we are always aware of our scars from are past.

Jacky was born and raised in the Bay Area. She is absolutely in love with conceptual and surrealist design. Constantly experimenting with different mediums, she uses the body as a canvas to sculpt around it. Eventually Jacky would like to flex her conceptual design and aesthetic muscles by creating costume designs for Cirque du Soleil and other theatrical platforms.

Johnny Paul Vera

Collection: Female Manifestation
Awards: scholarship/internship with Nicole Miller
(jvera@cca.edu)
Female Manifestation is an investigation of the female form that embodies expansion and reduction. A transparent fashion design reveals traditional tailoring techniques yet crafts an armor of ideal female proportions.

Johnny is from Fresno. He has traveled far from the fields of the Central Valley in his quest to become a fashion designer. His appreciation of the female mystique was cultivated by his Abuela (a feminine noun meaning grandmother) in memory of his late mother. Johnny seeks to bring his familial history into his design work and does so with a subtle hand in textile choice and color application.

Sam E. Weinberg

Collection: Umbra
(sweinberg@cca.edu)
Intrigued by the aura of nocturnal creatures and wanting to depict something that has yet to be seen as beautiful, Sam e. became inspired by moths. Seeking to capture the delicate qualities found within their feather-like wings, she pieced together various textiles in shapes that mimicked a moth's wings in flight.

Sam e. collects inspiration as though it were a rare object. Her shelves are overflowing with items that tell a story, whether it be a found snapshot or a vintage embroidery. She sees the beauty in it all. Applying this collected sensibility to her design process, she creates pieces that evoke a sense of nostalgia, but simultaneously speak of something new and innovative.

Ana Zaharia

Collection: Flora
(azaharia@cca.edu)
Flora is a conceptually inspired collection that takes the organic unfolding of flower petals and translates it into intricate feminine garments in an unexpected manner. The organic revolution of fabric around the body evolves delicate details into edgy expressive shapes.

As a little girl she was intrigued by how expressive the clothing was in Japanese anime books. She has come far from loving just drawing details and folds for hours, but my design aesthetic and principles still resonate with my perfectionist eye for romantic feminine details and her emotional tie to her designs. Today her design process is rooted in expression of self though clothing to get a fluid connection between wearer and wear.

Learn about the 2010 Fashion Design collections.

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