LGBT News

Posted on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 by Jim Norrena

2016 Sundance Ignite Fellow Janak Reddy VootkuruView slideshow 

MFA in Film program's Janak Reddy Vootkuru, a second-year student and digital photographer and filmmaker who moved to San Francisco from India to study film at CCA, was recently accepted into the 2016 Sundance Ignite Fellowship program!

Now in its second year, the competitive Sundance Ignite program accepts only a select group of 18-to-24-year-old emerging filmmakers each year. This year’s participants will engage in a rigorous and exciting program schedule set for January 27 to 31 during the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.

According to MFA in Film co-chair Rob Epstein, “CCA was one of only a select group of schools invited to submit candidates, so this is a really great accomplishment for Janak, our program, and CCA.”

As a studying filmmaker, Vootkuru is exploring the possibilities of time-based media. He is working in narrative, nonfiction, and hybrid forms, immersing himself in a range of practices throughout CCA’s two-year MFA in Film program. 

Watch a selection of Vootkuru’s films

Posted on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 by Laura Braun

Undergraduate Writing and Literature and MFA in Comics associate professor Justin Hall has a busy life outside his day-to-day responsibilities at CCA.

Posted on Monday, August 24, 2015 by Laura Braun

“Comics inspired and sustained me,” the rising junior year at California College of the Arts continued, “especially as I reached adolescence and was forced to come to terms with my own identity in a town that was typically either apathetic or overtly hostile to LGBTQ folk.” But, he added, “Sadly, in none of these or any other comic I could find at the time was there a transmasculine character with a leading story arc.”

Visit source »

Posted on Monday, June 29, 2015 by Chris Bliss

CCA joins the 2015 San Francisco Pride Parade

This past weekend (June 26-28) marked the first time California College of the Arts (CCA) participated in the annual San Francisco Pride Parade -- the largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender parade in the nation.

Posted on Thursday, June 11, 2015 by Nick Janikian

Community Arts major Zach Brozman

Congratulations to Community Arts major and poet Zach Ozma (né Brozman), who was awarded an All-College Honors Award (Fine Arts division) as well as won the 2015 annual Student Book Arts Competition (sponsored by the CCA Libraries).

Each spring CCA sponsors the All-College Honors Awards competition, which recognizes outstanding student achievement. Twenty-three scholarship awards are given to students in the BA, BFA, and BArch undergraduate programs and the MA, MBA, MFA, and MArch graduate programs. (The awards are granted during the fall semester.)

Learn more about All-College Honors Awards »

There's No Other Ghost I'd Rather Get Cruised By, a handmade book Ozma has been working on intensely this year, was selected as one of two winning books in the 2015 annual Student Book Arts Competition.

Posted on Thursday, May 7, 2015 by Jim Norrena

Friends and family encouraged to join!
Please join the CCA Pride Parade contingent Sunday, June 28, as faculty, staff, students, and alumni march in the 45th annual San Francisco Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Pride Parade, described as the "largest gathering of LGBT people and allies in the nation."
 
Equality Without Exception is the theme, and we're thrilled to represent CCA and show just how much pride the college has for its diverse community.
 
We want you and your family to join us!

Posted on Thursday, January 1, 2015 by Glen Helfand

Holland Cotter speaking at CCA's Honorary Doctorate Luncheon

Without oversight, the art world might be ruled by spectacle and sales. We hear a lot about record-setting auction prices, blue-chip artists, and art fair attendance figures. All well and good for the beneficiaries, but these are just parts of a much more nuanced arts ecosystem.

Too easily eclipsed is the fact that most art is made by people who have plenty more on their minds than making money. Which is why a critic with the humanistic temperament of Holland Cotter is so important, and so refreshing to read.

About Holland Cotter

Cotter is a Pulitzer prize–winning writer, a poet, and the recipient of CCA’s 2014 honorary doctorate in fine arts. He writes weekly reviews and more extensive essays for the New York Times, where he’s been a full-time critic since 1998.

Cotter is hardly strident -- he’s more like an endearing watchdog -- and his thoughtful writings encourage readers to consider the value of aesthetic and intellectual adventurousness. He also consistently draws attention to artists and perspectives that might otherwise be overlooked.

It’s an important role, and he carries it out with engaged responsibility and humbleness.

Posted on Monday, October 13, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

When current CCA Director of Fine Arts Tammy Rae Carland was in college, Nirvana played the rent parties she and her friends threw at their student-founded alternative gallery space. “This was before they released records and got super-famous,” she avers. “But still!”

They called the gallery Reko-Muse. The place: Olympia, Washington. “It really was a ‘build it and they will come’ kind of a scene. Everyone I knew was playing in a band, starting a gallery, putting out zines, precisely because there was nothing to do otherwise, culturally speaking. And people would drive from Seattle -- or further, even -- to come to shows. Olympia’s music scene became a really big deal.”

Carland, who was also in bands, ran a record label, and put out more than a few zines herself, is today a rock star in another realm: photography.

 

Posted on Thursday, September 11, 2014 by Emily Holmes

Adrienne Skye Roberts’ (MA Visual and Critical Studies 2009) installation titled It Is Our Duty to Fight, It Is Our Duty to Win / We Must Love Each Other and Protect Each Other / We Have Nothing to Loose But Our Chains (2013), shown at San Francisco’s Root Division gallery, depicted the following words on a sign that rested against a white wall:

“To be treated like everybody else.”

Hand painted in simple black lettering on a white picketing sign, it is easy to imagine these words chanted with pride, determination, and defiance during a political march.

Listen to a recorded audio of the chant »

Five other similar signs featured different statements and demands, such as “The hope to see my children again.” The people who spoke these words did not always have the freedom to practice the civil right of protesting.

In fact, the work reflects the answers of previously incarcerated women whom Roberts asked, “How did you survive prison?” “What do you need to survive now that you are out?” “And what does a world without mass incarceration look like?”

Visit the artist's website »

Posted on Tuesday, July 1, 2014 by Jim Norrena

Cheryl Dunye and Kingston Farady discuss BLACK IS BLUE

Cheryl Dunye, previous Film faculty and current graduate advisor, earned the audience award for Best Short Film for Black Is Blue (2014) at this year's San Francisco International LGBT Film Festival (produced by Frameline), which ran from June 19 to 29.

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