LGBT News

Posted on Thursday, September 11, 2014 by Emily Holmes

Adrienne Skye Roberts’ (MA Visual and Critical Studies 2009) installation titled It Is Our Duty to Fight, It Is Our Duty to Win / We Must Love Each Other and Protect Each Other / We Have Nothing to Loose But Our Chains (2013), shown at San Francisco’s Root Division gallery, depicted the following words on a sign that rested against a white wall:

“To be treated like everybody else.”

Hand painted in simple black lettering on a white picketing sign, it is easy to imagine these words chanted with pride, determination, and defiance during a political march.

Listen to a recorded audio of the chant »

Five other similar signs featured different statements and demands, such as “The hope to see my children again.” The people who spoke these words did not always have the freedom to practice the civil right of protesting.

In fact, the work reflects the answers of previously incarcerated women whom Roberts asked, “How did you survive prison?” “What do you need to survive now that you are out?” “And what does a world without mass incarceration look like?”

Visit the artist's website »

Posted on Tuesday, July 1, 2014 by Jim Norrena

Cheryl Dunye and Kingston Farady discuss BLACK IS BLUE

Cheryl Dunye, previous Film faculty and current graduate advisor, earned the audience award for Best Short Film for Black Is Blue (2014) at this year's San Francisco International LGBT Film Festival (produced by Frameline), which ran from June 19 to 29.

Posted on Monday, June 30, 2014 by Simon Hodgson

Photo: Zack DeZon

How does an engineer reinvent himself? One possible answer: at art school.

In 1996, just a year after graduating from Johns Hopkins University with a degree in civil engineering, Bruce King-Shey felt lost.

A lifelong musician, he switched tracks from engineering to take an entry-level job at the Annapolis Symphony. But when his career in arts management began to feel stalled, he wasn’t sure where he should turn next.

Today King-Shey (Industrial Design 2004, MA Visual Criticism 2005) is vice president of design innovation at food and beverage giant PepsiCo.

His circuitous career path offers much insight into how an arts education can unlock hidden talents.

Posted on Thursday, May 8, 2014 by Rachel Walther

Jen Banta Yoshida interviews Nancy Hom for her Bernice Bing documentary

Jen Banta Yoshida (MA Visual and Critical Studies 2009) is many things: an activist, a writer, an artist, a San Francisco native. For the past seven years, she has been delving into the biography of the artist Bernice Bing.

Her intensive research culminated in The Worlds of Bernice Bing, a documentary film released in late 2013. (Watch the trailer »)

The film will screen next at the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento on June 26, 2014 , followed by a Q&A with Jen Banta Yoshida and Lenore Chinn.

Bing was also a San Francisco native. She was born in 1936 in Chinatown and worked in the city for most of her life, as a painter and an activist for community-based arts.

Posted on Wednesday, February 26, 2014 by Allison Byers

Team members Kristina Kotlier (MArch 2013) (left) and Raine Paulson Andrews (MArch 2014) (right) with a STAND UP supporter

In spring 2013, three CCA students came together with one common goal: to make a difference with an IMPACT Social Entrepreneurship Award from CCA’s Center for Art and Public Life.

Robert Gomez (MFA and MA Visual and Critical Studies 2013), Raine Paulson Andrews (MArch 2014), and Kristina Kotlier (MArch 2013) were indeed one of three teams who won the award for summer 2013, and the project they carried out, STAND UP with Jamaica, was a major turning point for all of them.

Posted on Wednesday, February 5, 2014 by Jim Norrena

(l-r) Pratibha Parmar, Alice Walker, and Geena Davis [photo: Jim Norrena]

Pratibha Parmar is a British filmmaker, director, producer, and writer who is known internationally for her political and often controversial documentary film work. She’s also a stalwart activist within the global feminism and lesbian rights movements.

In short, her accomplishments and commitment to making art that matters makes her an ideal visiting artist (MFA in Film) here at California College of the Arts.

Before she was born, Parmar’s family emigrated from India to East Africa, and then later immigrated to London, where she was raised and went on to study at Bradford and Birmingham Universities where she earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees, respectively.

Posted on Thursday, November 21, 2013 by Jim Norrena

(l-r) Film chair Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman

On Tuesday, November 26, 2013, the United Nations hosted a screening of Film chair Rob Epstein's and Jeffrey Friedman’s short film, The Battle of amfAR (Telling Pictures), which premiered at Sundance Film Festival. The film details the story of two very charismatic and powerful women who joined forces to create America’s first AIDS research foundation: Dr. Mathilde Krim and film legend Elizabeth Taylor.

The screening followed a discussion with Dr. Krim, and executive producer Kenneth Cole. The event was cohosted by the United Nations Creative Community Outreach Initiative, UNAIDS, and amfAR (American Foundation for AIDS Research).

Attendees of the event included heads of international AIDS organizations as well as members of various advocacy groups.

Posted on Monday, November 4, 2013 by Allison Byers

Lain Kay, is a cross disciplinary artist focused in the mystique of identity branding. Graduate of California College of the Arts with a BFA in painting and drawing, his senior work portrays multiples of himself acting out appropriated cliches within art history and nationalistic propaganda. Indicative of a tounge-and-cheek punk attitude; these aesthetics inform and modify more recent performance works.

Visit source »

Posted on Thursday, September 5, 2013 by Allison Byers

Cheryl Dunye is an award-winning filmmaker and native of Liberia whose work as a queer black cinema artist attempts to provide visibility to disenfranchised identities and bring the most marginalized of our society to the center. She has five feature films under her belt and currently works as an Associate Professor of Film, Diversity Studies, and the Graduate Writing Programs at California College of the Arts.

Visit source »

Posted on Thursday, August 29, 2013 by Minnie Phan

Minnie Phan with work presented at her Junior Review

Prior to hearing about CCA, college was not an option in my mind. Aside from financial issues and living in an immigrant household with little experience with higher education, my teenage years were rocky.

I never thought more than two steps ahead when it came to my future. I struggled throughout my schooling and was consumed with (infamous and debilitating) angst. I spent many nights alone.

The turning point of my life occurred when I began to use my hobby of art as an outlet -- as therapy, even. Having my sketchbooks and journals bear witness to my manic thoughts and wild ideas became something of a ritual. It became a channel for every stupid decision I had made, every jerk who harassed me, every class I failed.

Art and writing became profound parts of my persona, and, thankfully, I found a community and companionship in fellow artists.

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