Alumni News

Posted on Tuesday, August 6, 2013 by Allison Byers

Kate Pocrass is a San Francisco artist. In 2011, she published the magazine Average, about average things. There was great acclaim. The next issue is coming out in ... well, it's hard to say.

A Pennsylvania native, she arrived in San Francisco in 1999, intent on completing her masters degree at California College of the Arts.

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Posted on Thursday, August 1, 2013 by Allison Byers

San Francisco is one of four cities where the ACC, a nonprofit in Minneapolis, annually holds events. "The Bay Area is home to many of the most influential and innovative artists, organizations and patrons of contemporary craft," says the ACC's Diamond.

"Combined with a significant history in craft education with schools such as California College of the Arts, the Bay Area plays an undeniable leading role in the ongoing story of American craft."

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Posted on Thursday, August 1, 2013 by Allison Byers

Dog-eared Rand McNally road atlases and battered spiral-bound Thomas Guides may be things of the past for most travelers, post-GPS, but they still compel San Francisco artist Val Britton, who chose to follow their lead while attending California College of the Arts as a graduate student about nine years ago.

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Posted on Thursday, August 1, 2013 by Allison Byers

Sculptural works by Nathan Lynch, who chairs the ceramics department at California College of the Arts, are highly enjoyable. They consist of piles: one of wood pieces, their ends painted so they resemble giant matchsticks; others of brilliantly colored clay or glazed porcelain bulbs as visually enticing as they are unsettlingly organic-looking (larvae come to mind).

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Posted on Thursday, August 1, 2013 by Allison Byers

As students at California College of the Arts in San Francisco, Aretha Sack and Janine Lee would mix nail polishes into their own custom colors, pour them back into the jar, and sell them - "just making some Franken-polish," said Lee, using the term popularized on crafting websites.

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Posted on Thursday, August 1, 2013 by Allison Byers

It started with HAART counselor Carol Wild placing an ad on Craigslist. Wild was looking for an artist to paint a mural on a large blank wall alongside the building that was a frequent target for graffiti. She didn't have any money to pay for it. Stern, a graduate of the California College of Arts and Crafts, responded. (Go to Stern's website at www.decoartoakland.com.)

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Posted on Thursday, August 1, 2013 by Allison Byers

Terminal Lance: The White Donkey is a webcomic that is written and illustrated by Maximilian Uriarte, a prior-enlisted Marine with a Bachelor in Fine Arts in Animation from the California College of the Arts. Max tells us that he has been writing this story for the past three years. “It is a fictional story of a Marine, Abe, and his existential journey through the Marine Corps, Iraq, and his return home. Within the story, Abe enlists in the United States Marine Corps in the hopes of finding that missing something in his life that he can’t explain,” Max related.

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Posted on Thursday, August 1, 2013 by Allison Byers

After graduating from California’s College of the Arts, where her primary medium was sculpture, Lush said, she was turned off by the “pretentiousness” of the art world. She found the entertainment world a better fit.

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Posted on Thursday, August 1, 2013 by Allison Byers

The friends met at California College of the Arts in Rockridge, where Lee, now 24, was a fashion major and Sacks, 25, studied painting. Unsatisfied with the nail polish on the market, Sacks mixed her own nail polish colors for fun and shared them with Lee and their other friends.

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Posted on Monday, July 29, 2013 by Rachel Walther

Grady Gordon in his studio (photo by Rachel Walther)

Grady Gordon (Illustration 2008) says that he does one thing, and does it well. Since his last year of study at CCA, he's been working almost exclusively in monotypes. This is a (somewhat unpredictable!) printmaking process in which ink is applied directly to a smooth Plexiglas surface, then paper is pressed to the Plexiglas, resulting in one-of-a-kind prints.

Gordon's portraits of demons, goblins, and warriors have a visceral and urgent quality to them. You half-expect his creations to leap off the paper and into the night.

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