Alumni News

Posted on Friday, April 12, 2013 by Matthew Harrison Tedford

Amber Stucke's (MFA 2011) recent works all depict ambiguously biological organisms. Her drawings look like diagrams from 19th-century science books, at once familiar and alien. They are inspired by symbiosis, both as a natural phenomenon and as a metaphor for human relations. "They show imaginary organic forms. The forms have their relationships with each other, and I have a relationship with them."

Imaginary as they may be, Stucke's forms are based on local algae, fungus, moss, and lichen specimens she finds on her frequent trips to the Bay Area's forests and beaches. What she draws are her personal interpretations of these finds. "I'm translating from my own body. I'm more interested in looking at the interactions than doing a strict illustration."

Posted on Thursday, April 4, 2013 by Matthew Harrison Tedford

For friends Clive Hacker (Graphic Design 2012), Trevor Hacker (Graphic Design 2008), and Harrison Pollock (Graphic Design 2010), design is about a lot more than lines, colors, and fonts.

"Or working on the computer," adds Clive, speaking specifically about the trio's band, Sunbeam Rd., which formed in 2009 during his years at CCA (and was just featured today -- April 5, 2013 -- in the San Francisco Bay Guardian).

The three friends, who all hail from Lompoc, California, definitely perceive a relationship between the graphic design process and the process of producing an album. "With both, you have think about every aspect that you're putting together," says Clive.

Trevor agrees: "There's an overarching thematic element that's happening, but you still have to design each little piece, every idea, and then put them together. All these little tiny parts become the whole."

Posted on Tuesday, April 2, 2013 by Jim Norrena

Rob Fatal's "La Bamba 2" premieres April 13 at the Victoria Theatre

Fewer than six months ago we reported alumnus Rob Fatal (MFA 2012) had completed his first feature film, La Bamba 2: Hell Is a Drag, which came to fruition as his Graduate Program in Fine Arts thesis. (Look for the CCA all-star crew listed in the credits!)

Fatal was awarded a $5,000 grant from the Berkeley FILM Foundation, which was instrumental in finishing post-production on the film.

Posted on Thursday, March 28, 2013 by Allison Byers

California artist Ann Weber began her career making large ceramic pottery. She studied with Viola Frey at California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, whose totemic clay figures inspired the scale of Weber's own work.

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Posted on Thursday, March 28, 2013 by Allison Byers

Having trouble finding consistent work despite having a degree, Hutton enrolled in the California College of the Arts and focused on design. His first project after graduating was a restaurant called Today's on Union Square. Although it's no longer in business, Interior Design Magazine profiled the establishment in 1979.

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Posted on Tuesday, March 26, 2013 by Christina Linden

Teknion NeoCon Showroom by Michael Vanderbyl, Chicago, 2012

"My high school guidance counselor told me I wasn't smart enough to be an architect," Michael Vanderbyl said, wryly, as he handed me the program produced last fall on the occasion of his induction into the Interior Design Hall of Fame. Given the multidisciplinary course of his extraordinary career, perhaps the counselor meant to say something more like, "Vanderbyl is too intelligent to be limited to just one pursuit."

The Hall of Fame award is reserved for individuals who have made a significant contribution to the prominence of the design industry. Other inductees over the years have included such legendary figures as Frank Gehry, Antonio Citterio, and Massimo and Lella Vignelli.

"It's very flattering to be counted among such company," Vanderbyl says. "I had attended the Hall of Fame event in the past -- it's held at the Waldorf-Astoria in Manhattan -- and it was fantastic to be recognized there myself."

Posted on Thursday, March 21, 2013 by Allison Byers

A product is being developed out of the Forest Products Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin collaborating with artist Christine Lee and US Department of Agriculture's John F. Hunt. The product in process is a MDF alternative using no resins and a combination of biodegradable and recycled materials such as used cardboard, cow manure and sawdust.

Posted on Thursday, March 21, 2013 by Allison Byers

"Being a black artist, the first thing people want to talk about is your blackness, the importance of your blackness and your black presence. What I like about this show is that I felt free from that blackness and I could really exploit the pen and do crazy patterns and have that be the focal point of it," says Odutola, 27, who graduated from California College of the Arts last year. "I'm celebrating the ink and what it can do and transforming what it can be."

Posted on Thursday, March 7, 2013 by Allison Byers

At 23, Rosannah Sandoval is the AIA's youngest licensed architect. Currently a designer in Perkins + Will's San Francisco office, she attended Auburn and its Rural Studio program, as well as CCA. One of her recent projects at Perkins + Will, Calexico West Land Port of Entry, won a 2013 Progressive/Architecture Award from Architect magazine. AIA San Francisco reached out to Sandoval to learn more about her experiences in architecture, the challenges she has faced, and her future goals.

Posted on Thursday, March 7, 2013 by Christina Linden

In the past year, Orfeo Quagliata (Wood/Furniture 1999) has designed: exterior vinyl graphics for an Aeromexico 767 airplane; sets for Mexico's massively popular annual 24-hour-long television and radio broadcast benefit Teletón; glass tiles for architectural interiors and exteriors; jewelry; window displays for Barneys New York; hotel lobbies; coffee tables; whiskey glasses; and garden features for millionaires' homes.

Quagliata was born and raised in the Bay Area; today his studio is based in Mexico City, and the world is his oyster. It is extremely unusual for a designer to operate in so many media and at so many scales of production, from a tiny piece of jewelry to an airplane exterior, but maintaining a robust and diverse practice keeps his creative energies high . . . and ensures that his design work will be in demand no matter whether the global economy is ebbing or flowing.

His schedule is typically jam-packed; when we spoke for this piece, he was getting ready to catch a plane for a new overseas commission: "I'm going to Taiwan to work on an installation on the grounds of new high-rise residential towers. The work is two reflecting pools with these big, faceted, blinged-out, illuminated glass sculptural forms. These kinds of huge commissions are always fun and overwhelming at the same time."

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