Alumni News

Posted on Thursday, May 16, 2013 by Allison Byers

Jenny Parks is a scientific illustrator that also happens to be a shameless nerd, with a penchant for drawing animals, dinosaurs, imaginary creatures… and occasionally, people as cats. Somehow, she found herself with a bit of internet fame with the illustration ‘Doctor Mew’, and has been baffled ever since. With a BFA in illustration from the California College of the Arts, and a graduate degree in Science Illustration from UC Santa Cruz, she now resides in San Francisco as a freelance illustrator, fulfilling her destiny to make a living drawing cute, fuzzy things.

Posted on Wednesday, May 15, 2013 by Allison Byers

“Words and Places: Etel Adnan,” organized by the graduating class of the Graduate Program in Curatorial Practice at California College of the Arts, is an impeccably timed exhibition, a gift to those of us who wanted to learn more about Adnan after encountering her paintings and tapestry at last summer’s Documenta.

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Posted on Wednesday, May 15, 2013 by Allison Byers

Kelly Jones is the creator of Little Paper Planes, an online platform that currently helps more than 70 emerging artists sell their work and pursue publishing and licensing opportunities. This year Jones, an artist and curator herself, teamed up with public television station KQED on “Working Title,” a new video series that explores how local artist entrepreneurs are re-inventing the American Dream by creating alternative economies.

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Posted on Thursday, May 9, 2013 by Allison Byers

Textiles instructor Sasha Duerr (center) and Local Wisdom students (photo: Jim Norrena)

This spring, CCA Fashion Design students addressed questions about garment use while participating in Local Wisdom, an ongoing international fashion research project that examines how we use, share, and engage with our clothes.

Several student projects selected as finalists will be featured in spring 2014 in a participatory symposium and exhibition in London, along with work from six other international design schools.

Posted on Tuesday, May 7, 2013 by Allison Byers

The first applications, however, are pure art. Lee lead an exhibition at San Francisco’s Intersection for the Arts called By-Product Becomes Product inviting five artists who worked with the new wood material. Their creations range from benches with woven planks to a series of birdhouses and a pickup truck cap. The material was not under much strain (it was neither coated to protect from rain, nor under much load), but Lee says the next step is to start introducing the material as a practical substitute for its conventional but toxic counterparts.

Posted on Monday, May 6, 2013 by Allison Byers

The recently released episode focuses on Oakland-based ceramicists, Atelier Dion. Owners Jay and Rie Dion are a husband and wife duo who met in 2008 while attending graduate school at California College of the Arts. After graduation, the couple realized that they could use their skills as ceramic artists to create a business focused on custom fabrication. In this episode, they discuss the ins and outs of starting a business and the sacrifices and compromises they have made to get their vision off the ground.

Posted on Thursday, May 2, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Zak Timan (Glass 2009)

I make floating sculpture. Using buoyant materials such as cork, blown glass, hollow metal forms, and bird's eggshells, I create compositions that float in clear, oil-filled glass vessels. The compositions' elements are tethered to the vessel bottom with line or chain, suspending them in liquid space.

My Richmond studio is my lab. Inside various testing tanks, including a six-foot-tall glass column, I perform buoyancy and materials experiments. I have tools for glass flameworking and sculpture fabrication, and a computer for 3-D modeling. It’s a little unusual to build glass parts to such precise dimensions, but I enjoy working in this way.

The human parts of my studio are my two remarkable shop-mates: one an LED engineer, and the other a pyrotechnics expert. Both are artists as well. We share a collection of machine and hand tools: a mill, a lathe, a CNC-plasma cutter, and many more.

I love being around such wizards of science, engineering, and light. Every day they are working on something fresh and awe-inspiring.

Photography by Andria Lo

Posted on Thursday, May 2, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Shawn HibmaCronan (Sculpture and Furniture 2009)

My studio is in a large, charmingly aged industrial space in an old hangar on the Alameda Naval Air Base. The building is at the end of a runway that extends south into the heart of San Francisco Bay.

The industrial capacity of the site, combined with the privacy and central view of the Bay Area, make for an incredible working environment. The material qualities and patina of the space mesh well with my work, which gets done via long days, late nights, loud music, and heavy-duty machinery.

Photography by Andria Lo

Posted on Thursday, May 2, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Curtis Arima (Jewelry / Metal Arts 1998, now Jewelry / Metal Arts faculty)

My studio is in the Sawtooth Building in West Berkeley. It is a historic structure, built to house the Kawneer Company factory in 1913, and then later home to the Sealy Mattress Company.

I specialize in ancient jewelry and metalworking practices that are no longer in widespread use in industry because of their time-consuming nature. I want to honor their history and continue their legacy while having a contemporary conversation.

Even though my studio is divided into a retail space and a making space, the "threshold" is transparent; the intent is for people who visit the retail space to be able to see and connect with my processes of making and understand more about what they are looking at and buying.

The studio is definitely an extension of my artistic brain. The aesthetic and functional aspects are totally intertwined. This is also exciting when clients and the public come in, as it allows them access to parts of my artistic process that they'd otherwise never see.

Photography by Andria Lo

Posted on Thursday, May 2, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Bryson Gill
(Painting/Drawing 2005)

My studio is a large private space in the Mission District of San Francisco. It is broken up into two rooms. The smaller one is for sculpture and prop making. The walls are covered with pine shelving for props and other objects, and, disregarding the mess, it looks more like a store than a studio.

The second and main room I use primarily as a painting studio. It has a large wall of south-facing windows that keep it evenly lit throughout the day. It's an incredible gift to have such great natural working light.

There are so many special things about the space: wood floors, tall ceilings, white walls, windows, roof access, a shop, and proximity to a handful of other artists who share the same floor of the building. There is no place I'd rather be.

Photography by Andria Lo