Alumni News

Posted on Thursday, July 5, 2012 by Allison Byers

Mary Meyer was once a painter whose sartorial ambitions exceeded her wallet’s limitations. Thus, she began making clothes that she wanted to wear. And people just started buying it off of her. She’s still a painter. As a graduate of California College of Arts & Crafts, her fine arts skills take the place of the a design background.

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Posted on Tuesday, July 3, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

Woodcut
Princeton Architectural Press, 2012
Hardcover, 128 pages, $29.95

If there is, indeed, nothing lovelier than a tree, the Connecticut-based artist Bryan Nash Gill (MFA 1988) shows us why. Creating large-scale relief prints from the cross-sections of trees, the artist reveals the sublime power locked inside their arboreal rings. Gill creates patterns not only of great beauty but also year-by-year records of the life and times of fallen or damaged logs. He rescues the wood from the property surrounding his studio and neighboring land, extracts and prepares blocks of various species (including ash, maple, oak, spruce, and willow), then makes prints by carefully following and pressing the contours of rings and ridges until the intricate designs transfer from tree to paper.

The results are colored, nuanced shapes -- mesmerizing impressions of the structural integrity hidden inside each tree. These exquisitely detailed prints are collected and published here for the first time, with an introduction by the esteemed nature writer Verlyn Klinkenborg and an interview with the artist describing his labor-intensive printmaking process. Also featured are Gill's series of printed lumber and offcuts, such as burls, branches, knots, and scrubs.

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Posted on Tuesday, July 3, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

The Art of Stanley Grosse
Blurb, 2012
Hardcover/paperback, 200 pages, $70/$60

Stanley Grosse (1956 alumnus) and photographer/designer Bob Will (also an alum from the 1950s) created this biography featuring Grosse's life and work. It features 550 photographs and extensive comments by friends and former students. There is also a second version available that excludes the comments (160 pages, 469 photographs, $63 hardcover / $49 paperback).

Grosse says: "Bob Will flew to Maui to meet me. He's now 70 years old. He went away with interviews, hundreds of photos, and a secret desire to do his first book. We Skyped and shared screens, allowing us to have a dialogue while the book was in progress. I furnished him with stacks of CDs with archival photos of my travels, my art over the last 50 years, my master's project completed in Mexico in the early 1960s , discussions of my work, and much more, right up to the present day. A labor of love, but a dream come true of a proper biography.

"Those of us graduating back in those '50s days are getting more rare. Just losing too many old friends. But those of us remaining are dedicated to continuing our craft and have a deep regard for our CCAC. I'm in a wheelchair now but I still feel like when I graduated back in 1956. At least my brain thinks so. I recently finished 200 paintings on envelopes using a variety of materials: watercolor, acrylics, ink stains, transparent overlays, and collage. Since becoming wheelchair-bound, it's the first time in my life that I've dedicated time to doing small pieces. What fun. My electric go-go scooter allows me to get around to photograph and make visual comments about my surroundings.

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Posted on Monday, July 2, 2012 by Rachel Walther

It was Alison Bailey's fearlessness that brought her home. A 2003 graduate of CCA's Photography Program and now an associate producer for the Travel Channel TV show Bizarre Foods, Bailey asks herself every day as part of her job, "Where haven't I been before?"

It's this enthusiasm for exploration that originally brought her from Minneapolis to CCA, then across the country to New York, and finally back to Minneapolis in search of a creative career that felt like home.

She landed this job with Tremendous! Entertainment, the company that produces Bizarre Foods, in 2010. The show, now in its sixth season, introduces audiences to exotic and regional foods of the world, from Alaska to Thailand. As an associate producer, she plans the day-to-day pre-production schedule, researches people and locations for future shows, and coordinates the details of filming.

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Posted on Thursday, June 28, 2012 by Ace Lehner

From August 3 to 5, approximately 30 students will present their work at CCA's "School to Market" booth at the American Craft Council Show at Fort Mason Center in San Francisco.

With more than 230 of the top contemporary jewelry, clothing, furniture, and home-decor artists from across the country, this is the largest juried craft show west of the Rockies, providing an unparalleled opportunity for students to exhibit their fine art and functional craft works in a high-profile venue.

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Posted on Thursday, June 28, 2012 by Allison Byers

Alongside collections of everyday objects like light-switch covers and felt bags, Rachel Gant’s SF Design Week offerings earlier this month were decidedly in-season. She was showing a series of bags that convert into picnic blankets, and in the store’s window, she put a giant spinning top on display. It was still light out when the evening event started, and I surely wasn’t the only one eying the combo for a final bit of fun before dusk.

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Posted on Wednesday, June 27, 2012 by Chris Bliss

Harrell Fletcher (MFA 1994) invites busking musicians to take their performances from the tube stations and streets of London into the gallery to play live and online to the BMW Tate Live Performance Room's global audience on June 28.

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Posted on Wednesday, June 27, 2012 by Allison Byers

East Bay ceramicist Brük Dunbar explores ecological catastrophe of the Southwest in her new show.

A few years ago, when East Bay ceramic sculptor Brük Dunbar was on a trip with her mother through her homeland, deep in the badlands of New Mexico near El Malpais National Monument, she encountered a sheepherder. "This guy was totally off the grid — well, there is no grid out there," Dunbar recalled. "We met him standing under a sign that read, 'I'm an attorney. Were you a miner in the 1960s? I can help you.' The whole place is ruined by uranium mining!"

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Posted on Tuesday, June 26, 2012 by Chris Bliss

Reviewing portfolios at CCA's annual Career Expo

Findings from the Strategic National Arts Alumni Project (SNAAP), a national study released last week, show that Americans with arts degrees are highly satisfied with their educational and career experiences. Nine out of 10 (87 percent) of arts graduates responding to the survey who are currently employed are satisfied with their jobs.

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Posted on Tuesday, June 26, 2012 by Rachel Walther

When CCA alumni (and married couple) Kevin Krueger and Kristin Olson (both Individualized Major 2011) were looking around the Bay Area for an affordable studio the year after graduation, they found their dream space at 1158 Howard Street in San Francisco, formerly the home of leather bondage shop Stormy Leather.

There was just one problem: With its multiple ground floor rooms, basement areas, and loft, it was simply too large for their needs. "We didn't know what to do at first with that much space," remembers Krueger. But then the answer presented itself: They opened up their more-than-enough studio to a larger community of friends and colleagues. Staring in January 2012, the newly named Alter Space began hosting a series of exhibitions, workshops, and live performances.

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