Alumni News

Posted on Tuesday, January 31, 2012 by Christina Linden

(photo by Ryan Stirtz, Stirtz New Media)

Jonah Ward (Glass 2006) makes his work with molten glass . . . but the glass is absent in the finished pieces. With deft movements he pours the material onto wood panels laid out horizontally on the floor, creating a crystalline tracery. "People are always asking me if Jackson Pollock is my favorite painter," he quips. There's definitely some logic to the comparison: the substrate laid flat, the artist standing above, crouching and extending his arms in sweeping motions. Ward's movements are more like those of someone spreading honey from a dipper on (giant) morning toast, though, and necessarily involve a great deal less spattering and flinging. In the end he removes the solidified glass from the wood, and the burnt patterns left behind constitute the artwork in its final form: ready like a palimpsest, with shadows that trace of the nimble choreography of the artist's actions.

"I entered CCA as a Painting/Drawing major, but switched to Glass partway through," Ward explains. Although, in a way, he has come full-circle by returning to work that is essentially a kind of drawing. Solo exhibitions at the cool new San Francisco gallery 12 Gallagher Lane and a flurry of media attention attests to the appeal of his unique approach.

Check out the 2010 feature on Jonah Ward in California Home + Design

Ward was nominated, and was a reader's choice finalist in 7x7's "The Hot 20 Under (and Over) 40" (and he mentioned CCA!)

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Posted on Monday, January 30, 2012 by Allison Byers

It’s not easy to get 160 black men from 11 American cities in one room to talk about their identity.

So the four collaborators who created “Question Bridge: Black Males,” the latest multimedia exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum, did the next best thing.

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Posted on Monday, January 30, 2012 by Simon Hodgson

Joseph Becker in the Dieter Rams exhibition at SFMOMA [photo: Michael Armenta]

Joseph Becker (BArch 2007) comes from a creative family: In the 1980s, his parents combined their film and education backgrounds to open Southern California's first Gymboree kids' program, and his sister has her own fashion line. His North Hollywood high school actually offered classes in set design, and he further developed what he calls "a taste for space" with classes in architecture and design at UCLA and Art Center College of Design. He arrived at CCA in 2002 to formally begin his undergraduate studies with a plan to become a product designer, but he switched to architecture during his first year. He is now an assistant curator of architecture and design at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

How would you sum up your CCA experience?

There was a real sense of connection to San Francisco. With the Architecture faculty made up of professors who were also designing independently, I knew I was learning from people who were actually doing things. The studio environment, with late late nights and a palpable energy buzzing around you, was catalytic. You could get everything out of it if you put in the work, and if you were motivated by your own inquisitiveness.

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Posted on Thursday, January 26, 2012 by Allison Byers

California College of the Arts (CCA) has joined the It Gets Better Project, an online video campaign aimed at eliminating suicide among LGBTQ people by providing real-world testimonials illustrating hope.

CCA is the first arts college in the US to submit an official college-wide It Gets Better video. The video features students, alumni, faculty and staff who volunteered to share their life experiences regarding coming out and living openly as a member of the LGBTQ community.

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Posted on Wednesday, January 25, 2012 by Jim Norrena

"A Great Day in San Francisco" [photo: Chris Nickel]

California College of the Arts proudly announces the release of It Gets Better: CCA, the official college submission in the It Gets Better Project, a national gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) youth suicide-prevention campaign. CCA is among the first art colleges to create an institutional video for the internationally recognized project.

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Posted on Wednesday, January 18, 2012 by Allison Byers

Filming Question Bridge: Black Males

On any given day we encounter dozens, even hundreds, of people who are different from us: a different race, a different gender, a different class, a different age . . . We intellectually understand that our own identity is multifaceted, yet sometimes we cannot help grouping people into stereotypes, even within what others would consider a diverse demographic.

A team of four artists—CCA Photography faculty Chris Johnson, two CCA alumni, Hank Willis Thomas (MFA and MA Visual Criticism 2004) and Bayeté Ross Smith (MFA 2004), and Kamal Sinclair—have begun a far-reaching conversation on this topic, engaging a diverse group of African American males in a question-and-answer exchange. Their innovative trans-media project is entitled Question Bridge: Black Males, and it seeks to represent and redefine black male identity in America.

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Posted on Tuesday, January 17, 2012 by Clay Walsh

Sally Mann [courtesy of City Arts & Lectures]

Sally Mann

In Conversation with Steven Jenkins
Wednesday, March 21, 8 p.m.
Venue: Herbst Theatre
401 Van Ness Avenue (at McAllister)
San Francisco

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Posted on Tuesday, January 17, 2012 by Allison Byers

As we celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, it's important to remember that we still have a long way to go in the fight against racial discrimination. A recent exhibition that confronts stereotypes and attempts to bridge divisions between people is "Question Bridge: Black Males" -- a new video installation currently on view at the Brooklyn Museum that consists of a series of interviews with Black men in the United States today.

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Posted on Tuesday, January 10, 2012 by Allison Byers

Stacey Rozich is a Seattle-based Illustrator and Graphic Designer. Stacey studied Illustration at California College of the Arts as well as Design at Seattle Central Creative Academy.

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Posted on Monday, January 9, 2012 by Allison Byers

Taha Belal was educated in Europe and the United States, but he chanced on the most exciting moment to move back to his native country and be schooled on the making of revolution. Just months after he relocated to Cairo, where he was born, from the Bay Area, where he received his master of fine arts at California College of the Arts, the first protesters of the Egyptian uprising began taking to the streets, eventually toppling the regime of President Hosni Mubarak.

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