Alumni News

Posted on Wednesday, May 30, 2012 by Jim Norrena

(l to r) Fashion Design chair Amy Williams, Maybelline representative Gabriel Almodovar, and program manager Pam Zahedani

CCA's sold-out 2012 Annual Fashion Show, a favorite among the numerous commencement-week events held at the college, took place Friday, May 11. The runway presentation, held inside a trademark tent in front of the main building on the San Francisco campus, is the program's capstone event of the year and serves to showcase the innovative thesis collections built by senior Fashion Design students.

Posted on Wednesday, May 30, 2012 by Christina Linden

Amy Campos and CCA students at the Dolores Shelter Program

In fall 2011, CCA faculty member Amy Campos and a group of Interior Design students worked with Dolores Shelter Program (DSP) as part of an ENGAGE at CCA course. Their brief: to generate ideas for the renovation of DSP's homeless shelter on South Van Ness in the Mission District of San Francisco.

The facility's residents are in great need of an empowering and supportive sense of place, hope, and safety, and the aspiration was to facilitate this via better space planning and organization, and the creation of more durable and usable furnishings and storage.

Posted on Tuesday, May 29, 2012 by Jim Norrena

Dave Muller and Lana Porcello with Leithian on Muller's lap [photo: Chris Orwig]

Fine artist and restaurateur David Muller (Painting/Drawing 2004) credits CCA with building his confidence in the unknown and broadening his perspective of how to approach art as a lifestyle, rather than a career or project.

Posted on Tuesday, May 29, 2012 by Jim Norrena

CCA's Painting/Drawing Program recently caught up with Alison Blickle, a member of the 2005 graduating class, and asked her a few questions about life after CCA. The following interview captures her responses:

How has your CCA education influenced your career accomplishments?

Posted on Tuesday, May 29, 2012 by Allison Byers

The California College of the Arts 2012 Graduate Fashion Show was in full celebratory mood on May 11, 2012 at its San Francisco campus, 1111 8th St. Once again, the proud tent hosting “the best street level runway show” was filled with supportive, exuberant friends, families, and fashion lovers. It truly felt like a giant big, warm family (and I was so happy to see Cynthia & Simon from Style Wylde again!!!!).

Posted on Friday, May 25, 2012 by Rachel Walther

Still from Paul Trillo's "How to Fly a Kite"

Paul Trillo (Film 2007) is a filmmaker, an illustrator, and, above all, a storyteller. Since graduating in 2007 he's been blazing a unique path --first in the Bay Area, and lately in New York -- with a prodigious output of dynamic, experimental short films and music videos. His new short film Happy Birthday Mr. Bracewell will be screening at the Cannes Film Festival's Short Film Corner in May.

It is a matter-of-fact fictional piece about a man named Gray Bracewell whose birthday is also the anniversary of the day his wife left him three years previous. Events depicted involve a long-lost brother, a decent bit of time travel, and the possibility of recapturing a love lost.

I spoke with Trillo in March 2012 about his recent projects and how CCA helped shape his artistic vision.

Posted on Thursday, May 24, 2012 by Allison Byers

MFA thesis exhibitions, though often overcrowded, are always abuzz with the excitement of eager, budding talent. This year's presentation at California College of the Arts, up through May 19, 2012, is no different. There are over four-dozen artists in the show, each ranging wildly in style, medium, and conceptual aims; selecting a half-dozen thesis students to highlight is no easy task. I can assure, at the very least, that in this bustling and ambitious show, there is something for everyone.

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Posted on Thursday, May 17, 2012 by Allison Byers

Contradictory as it may seem, absence can be a potent visual tool for addressing representation. Whether exploring a setting devoid of its central subjects or presenting marginalized histories and persons that have been sidelined from the dominant cultural record, Tammy Rae Carland’s photographs can manifest human intimacies and vulnerabilities, sometimes without any body in the image.

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Posted on Wednesday, May 16, 2012 by Jim Norrena

Plan Ahead -- Limited Summer Schedule

The Career Development Office is undergoing a metamorphosis! Learn more about career advising (June only) and other summer support for currently enrolled students and recent graduates (May 2012).

While help with the student job board, résumés, and cover letters is available throughout the summer, one-on-one career advising services are available during June only.

No career advising will be offered in July; and only limited advising in August.

Career Fellows

Posted on Wednesday, May 16, 2012 by Rachel Walther

Andrew Georgopoulos (2nd from left) on the set of "The Artist"

"People have always told me no, and I've done it anyway."

There's nowhere that Andrew Georgopoulos (Individualized Major 2007) won't go to get his image. He's photographed a nude woman in the middle of Lombard Street and documented the day-to-day exploits of Snoop Dogg and other hip-hop legends. Recently he grabbed his first Hollywood studio experience working on a film with a serious budget and an international crew that would go on to be named best picture of 2011: a production you may have heard of, called The Artist.

"It's all about access," Georgopoulos explains, of how to get the story you want. "It's the defining factor that separates you from the next person." His introduction to hip-hop musicians and lifestyles started by answering an ad soliciting photojournalists for a neighborhood magazine in the East Bay. "My body of work grew, from the next artist to the next. I was always looking to get the next big name, and I was able to come to them with a background." Eventually he spent a full year capturing the life of Snoop Dogg. This was during his sophomore year at CCA, when he was 20 years old.

Georgopoulos's work can be in-your-face, but his technique never overshadows his subject. His most engaging photos of musicians are often candid shots of their more mundane, day-to-day moments, and his travel photography is as contemplative as it is exotic. His personal work, on the other hand, captures for posterity those larger-than-life moments you see out of the corner of your eye or in your more vivid dreams.