Alumni News

Posted on Friday, July 18, 2014 by Laura Braun

St. John, who earned his MFA from the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland and studied at the California School of Fine Arts in San Francisco, discovered his love of painting while a sociology major at UC Berkeley in the late 1950s.

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Posted on Thursday, July 10, 2014 by Laura Braun

But the pair graduated from California College of the Arts in 2010, when full-time employment was hard to come by. They needed that kiln to create jobs for themselves.

"We were working out of our apartment's tiny, 150-square-foot garage, with the goal of doing pottery full time," says Jay. "It was our best idea." And a lucky one.

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Posted on Monday, July 7, 2014 by Rachel Walther

Frank Merritt and Teri Gardiner [Photo: Rachel Walther]

Frank Merritt (Architecture 1999) and Teri Gardiner (Graphic Design 2001) are both CCA alumni. Merritt is a principal at Jensen Architects, based in San Francisco. Gardiner is the marketing and communications manager at Richmond Art Center; she also maintains an active freelance graphic design practice.

They met through mutual CCA friends and married in 2009. They live in the lower Nob Hill / upper Tenderloin neighborhood of San Francisco and run the alternative/experimental gallery Ramon’s Tailor, located at 628 Jones Street.

CCA: What was the inspiration for starting Ramon’s Tailor in 2011? You are already both very busy people!

Frank: Ironically, the inspiration came out of working really long days. I was overwhelmed. I love my job -- I get to be creative and work with great people -- but I wasn’t making time for myself.

Then I read about Ray Oldenburg’s concept of a “third  place.” In addition to your workplace and your home, he says, to have a good life balance you need a third space: the barbershop, the gym, anything.

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Posted on Monday, July 7, 2014 by Rachel Walther

Emily Eifler (MFA 2011) has little time for sleep. She writes, directs, edits, and stars in her own YouTube channel, works full-time for a software research lab, and is a freelance columnist for KQED. Every aspect of her life has a common thread: her lifelong fascination with technology and culture.

On her YouTube channel, Blink Pop Shift, she posts new videos weekly on topics pertaining to her enthusiasms -- the history of search engines, say, or GIF artists -- in a way that’s funny and accessible.

“I was really interested in the possibilities of YouTube -- what you could do with good writing and ideas,” she says of her original inspiration for the series. “I started thinking about my personal relationship to technology, and my first videos were based on that. Literacy today is more than reading text. It’s reading interfaces and functionality as well.

“Discussing the history of technology gives people context for what we think of as the ‘digital revolution.’ To describe it as a singular event is an inaccurate representation of all the work that’s been done to get us to this point.”

The channel currently has more than 4,500 subscribers. Eifler is committed to keeping it online rather than migrating to some other format. “Putting my videos on TV would be a terrible idea. This channel is meant for YouTube, and I want it to be a really great web channel, not a stepping stone to old media. There are some cool collaborations in the pipeline, and some funded projects that I’m very excited about.”

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Posted on Monday, July 7, 2014 by Shiraz Chavan

Global outreach allows CCA to offer an arts education enriched with cultures

CCA might be closer to you than you think! Our Admissions Office representatives will be in Asia, Turkey, Canada, Central and South America this fall. View our travel schedule below and take this opportunity to make an individual appointment to get your portfolio reviewed and ask about our admissions requirements. Scheduling a on-on-one appointment with the representatives by clicking on their name below.

*Please note that we highly encourage you to RSVP for events as they fill up quickly.*

MEXICO

Guadalajara
Sept. 22

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Posted on Monday, June 30, 2014 by Simon Hodgson

Photo: Zack DeZon

How does an engineer reinvent himself? One possible answer: at art school.

In 1996, just a year after graduating from Johns Hopkins University with a degree in civil engineering, Bruce King-Shey felt lost.

A lifelong musician, he switched tracks from engineering to take an entry-level job at the Annapolis Symphony. But when his career in arts management began to feel stalled, he wasn’t sure where he should turn next.

Today King-Shey (Industrial Design 2004, MA Visual Criticism 2005) is vice president of design innovation at food and beverage giant PepsiCo.

His circuitous career path offers much insight into how an arts education can unlock hidden talents.

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Posted on Monday, June 23, 2014 by Laura Braun

After he was diagnosed with cancer at age 14, he was homeschooled by his mother and spent hours drawing, painting and doing ceramics. After completing a bachelor's in fine arts at California College of the Arts he left for Hawaii to build his first tree house, using hand tools and material found on the beaches and forests. When he came back to San Francisco to do a show of his paintings at Needles & Pens store, he made another tree house using recycled urban stuff and lived there for a month.

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Posted on Wednesday, June 18, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

Star 82 Review 2.1 and 2.2
CreateSpace, 2014
Paperback and online, $11.95
Issue 2.1 print / online
Issue 2.2 print
/ online

Star 82 Review is an art and literature magazine founded and edited by Printmaking faculty member Alisa Golden. Out now: issues 2.1 and 2.2!

“We’ve got color in the spring for issue 2.1, featuring a new poem by the wonderful Joanne Kyger,  photos by Mary Daniel Hobson that look like tattoos, but aren’t, and graffiti photos and stories and poems that revolve around individuality. Layered and worthy of multiple readings, these pieces deal with contradictions and alternate identities.”

Issue 2.1 features CCA alumnus Jønathan Lyons (MFA Writing 2005), who has created an erasure text from two pages of Frankenstein. 

Of issue 2.2, Golden says: “Like rivers, rocks, and beaches, the pieces in the summer issue 2.2 are about surviving, but also show how we take care of one another, how we often judge too quickly, how we discover compassion and hope: this is an eclectic, colorful mix of writing and art, from poems assembled from gravestones to portraits on toast.”

Issue 2.2 features CCA alumna Bonnie S. Kaplan (MFA 1991).

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Posted on Wednesday, June 18, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

500 Figures in Clay
Lark Crafts, 2014
Paperback, 420 pages, $27.95

The second volume of 500 Figures in Clay features seven CCA alumni. Congratulations to Shalene Valenzuela (MFA 1997), Nuala Creed (Ceramics 1999), Derek Weisberg (Ceramics 2005), Crystal Morey (Ceramics 2006), Joe Kowalczyk (Individualized Major 2006), Yeon Joo Lee (Ceramics 2012), and Victoria Jang (MFA 2014). The book features works by new and emerging ceramicists who chronicle the ongoing exploration of the human form. Amazon says: “From rustic creations to postmodern designs, from realistic to abstract, these pieces embody the diversity, imagination, and excellence of today's finest ceramic art.”

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Posted on Wednesday, June 18, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

Lost Children of the Far Islands
Knopf Books for Young Readers, 2014
Hardcover, 288 pages, $16.99

This book by alumna Emily Raabe (MFA Writing 2003) tells the story of twins Gustavia and Leomaris, who are utterly surprised one day when their mother becomes mysteriously ill . . . because she's not really human. She's a Folk, one of a group of people who can turn into animals. Gus and Leo are about to turn 11, the age at which the Folk begin to Turn, and they start to notice peculiar things happening to them, like being able to hold their breath under water for long periods of time. Soon they learn they are the last of the Folk, and the only ones who can stop the Dobhar-Chu, the villainous King of the Black Lakes, from escaping his cave prison.

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