Architecture News

Posted on Friday, November 16, 2012 by Rachel Walther

Glen Helfand (in the green T-shirt) with CCA students and Creativity Explored artists

A hall of mirrors reflecting an artist's actual view of the world; sculptural train tracks coming out of the wall and into the gallery space; colorful, hanging text-mobiles that evoke psychologically charged word-clouds; a fashion magazine devoted to one fabulous model; and a pop-up shop selling equestrian-themed T-shirts, jewelry, and drawings:

These are the works that will be on view in Fabricators, the culminating exhibition for Glen Helfand's fall 2012 ENGAGE at CCA course, at Jack Fischer Gallery in San Francisco, December 12-22, 2012. The public is invited to the reception on Saturday, December 15, 3-5 p.m.

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Posted on Wednesday, November 7, 2012 by Allison Byers

Slip-in Urbanism, by Anesta Iwan

CCA Architecture student Anesta Iwan (BArch, 2013) received an honorable mention for her project design entered in “Reimagining Tall: Considering Context, Sustainability & Efficiency,” the second annual International Student Design Competition sponsored by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH).

The goal of the 2012 competition was to shed new light on the meaning and value of tall buildings in modern society.

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Posted on Wednesday, October 31, 2012 by Allison Byers

Thinking about getting a masters degree but haven’t found the right field? California College of the Arts (CCA) in San Francisco just made it easier, announcing three new graduate programs beginning in 2013, bringing the total number of post-professional offerings to eleven. The trio of curricula includes: a Master of Architecture in Urban Design and Landscape (MAUDL), a MFA in Comics, and a MFA in Film.

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Posted on Friday, October 26, 2012 by Allison Byers

Techies beware or be-aware! The annual ACADIA conference rolled through San Francisco last weekend, and if you weren’t there, you missed a mind-blowing event.

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Posted on Wednesday, October 24, 2012 by Allison Byers

San Francisco's seemingly inevitable transformation into Silicon Valley's hipper, more bike-friendly older brother is already bringing a lot of changes to the city--higher rents, more private shuttle buses, increased frequency of Foursquare check-ins and a new kind of street festival.

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Posted on Monday, October 22, 2012 by Allison Byers

Shortly after San Francisco's Urban Prototyping Festival opened Saturday, the garden planter-slash-urinal wasn't getting much business, but there was a sizable crowd watching the graffiti war unfold and kids were lining up to bounce on the LED-lit hopscotch.

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Posted on Thursday, September 13, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

Francesco's Fountain
Lulu, 2011
Paperback, 80 pages, $7.99

This book by Katherine Rinne (Architecture faculty) is historical fiction for young adult readers who are interested in art and cities. It tells the story of Francesco, a 12-year old apprentice stonemason who leaves his small village to go to Rome in 1748. He works on the Trevi Fountain with his uncle, who designed it, and some other young apprentices. His errands and work take him all over this city of confusing streets and alleys. While he and the other apprentices are fictional characters, his uncle, Nicola Salvi and the other architects and sculptors are real historical figures. Under the guidance of these men, Francesco learns how to inspect marble and how to carve sculptural details. He learns about aqueducts and fountains and solves the mystery of the stolen water. When Rome is flooded in 1750 he helps save the Trevi Fountain.

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Posted on Tuesday, September 4, 2012 by Allison Byers

CCA and ZERO1

An architectural social stage. Whispering walls. A suspended streetscape installation. These are just a few of the innovative and dynamic contributions from CCA faculty and students featured in ZERO1 Biennial, opening September 12, 2012, in San Jose.

Contributors include Architecture faculty members Mona El-Khafif, Jason Kelly Johnson, Nataly Gattegno, and Christopher Haas, alumnus Mark Campos (BArch 2010), and student David Gastaneta (BArch 2013).

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Posted on Monday, August 20, 2012 by Allison Byers

The delightfully quirky neighborhood of South Park—clustered around San Francisco’s oldest park—is hoping to get a modern makeover.

Originally developed in 1855 as a West Coast version of a London square, houses and offices line a verdant, one-acre oval. The South Park commons is one of 15 parks and other facilities that would be the beneficiaries of a $195 million San Francisco Clean and Safe Parks Bond, should it pass in November.

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Posted on Tuesday, August 14, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

Scholarship recipients Renata Maria Araujo (in black dress, with a friend) and Lionel Ramazzini

The following speeches were delivered by CCA scholarship recipients at the Scholarship Dinner in fall 2011.

Renata Maria Araujo

My name is Renata Maria Araujo. I am a fourth-year Architecture student, and I would not be here without the Lloyd H. Oliver Memorial Scholarship. It is the reason I attend CCA. I share your understanding that education is the most transcendent gift one can be given, and it allows us to have a foot in the door of the future.

Knowing I have been awarded this scholarship makes me feel proud, and, at the same time, obliged. No artist is an island, and I am very aware of the community I aspire to be part of. More than anything, though, every time I present my work I am thankful for the trust and encouragement this award represents.

I lived abroad almost all my life, so arriving at CCA was a dramatic change. I was even unsure about pursuing architecture. Now, I am in my fourth year, and it is my future career. I've met new housemates, work buddies, and the city of San Francisco. I've learned how to take a design from my mind, to paper, to physical reality. This knowledge has changed the way I see the world. Sometimes I'll look at a building today and think now I understand, or, sometimes, ignorance is bliss.

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