Architecture News

Posted on Tuesday, March 31, 2015 by Laura Braun

That’s exactly what one man namedAndrew Maxfield-Parish had been wondering. Maxfield-Parish, who manages a creative technology and interactive electronics maker space at California College of the Arts, has a knack himself for making incredible gadgets. As a graduate of mechanical engineering at the University of Minnesota, many of his projects are well ahead of their time.

Posted on Monday, March 30, 2015 by Laura Braun

But Kloehn didn’t set out to make any political or symbolic statement. As long as he can remember, he loved building things. At first, growing up in Denver, it was forts. After getting his undergraduate degree at Evergreen State College, then attending California College of Arts and Crafts (now called California College of the Arts), he had a fantasy of building an “art utopia” in Oakland, filled with artist friends.

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Posted on Monday, March 30, 2015 by Laura Braun

The engineer and California College of the Arts Hybrid Lab manager has put together plenty of quirky creations of his own, but for two years, he’s had the 3D cheese printer in the back of his mind. He tried to get his students to build it, but no one would.

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Posted on Wednesday, March 18, 2015 by Laura Braun

Lujac Desautel has designed a yacht that is conceptually so obvious, it’s hard to say why it doesn’t exist yet. An architecture student at San Francisco California College of the Arts, Desautel designed this yacht as an entry to a young boat designers competition. This Young Designer of the Year Finalist (Boat International 2014) touts Legos and the natural landscape as his inspiration for Salt, the name he’s given this luxury glass-hull yacht.

Posted on Monday, March 16, 2015 by Laura Braun

Bred in the Digital Craft Lab at the California College of the Arts, the current progress demonstrates the principle of deploying multiple eight-legged drones that can drill and deploy their liquid payload, intended to “repair or maintain” the landing site.

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Posted on Monday, March 16, 2015 by Laura Braun

Behold then, a rendering of the boat of your dreams. The 55-meter vessel, christened Salt, isn’t real (yet), but there’s no doubt a band of obscenely wealthy people clamoring to change that. Salt is the work ofLujac Desautel, an architecture student at San Francisco’s California College of the Arts. He designed the ship as an entry to a young boat designers competition, which asked participants to take an existing hull of a sailboat and go crazy.

Posted on Friday, March 13, 2015 by Laura Braun

Desautel was last year nominated for Young Designer of the Year by Boat International Media and is a Bachelor of Architecture Student at California College of the Arts in the US.

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Posted on Friday, March 13, 2015 by Laura Braun

The newest yacht design by Oregon native Lujac Desautel is a majestic vessel that shimmers with a glass-encased deck, offering passengers the incredible experience of feeling close to the ocean. The California College of the Arts architecture student designed SALT with minimalistic principles and user experience in mind.  From a distance, the yacht looks like it’s made entirely of glass. A closer inspection reveals that the central deck is encased in a glass atrium, and the rest of the boat sparkles with a shiny white finish.

Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2015 by Jim Norrena

On Monday, March 9, members of CCA Architecture staff, faculty, and students came together on the San Francisco campus to discuss why the Black Lives Matter movement is important to its pedagogy -- and beyond -- as well as to the college’s over-arching initiative to promote diversity.

The Black Lives Matter Teach-In began with a standing-room-only presentation in Timken Lecture Hall on the San Francisco campus, and was followed by an organized teach-in held in the back of the Nave.

Among the various breakout groups were meaningful discussions that addressed specific curricular issues and challenges about how architecture as a discipline can address issues related to diversity.

Posted on Monday, March 9, 2015 by Laura Braun

Rinne, adjunct professor in the architecture program at California College of the Arts, is the author of The Waters of Rome: Aqueducts, Fountains, and the Birth of the Baroque City (Yale University Press, 2011). In her book, Rinne presents a unified vision of Rome during the Baroque period that links improvements to public and private water systems with political, religious and social change.

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