Architecture News

Posted on Monday, March 2, 2015 by Laura Braun

freelance architecture and yacht designer lujac desautel, well known for his nomination for the 2014 young designer of the year award by the boat international media, unveils the luxurious ‘SALT’ yacht to follow the ‘glass’ concept, envisioned in 2014. designed to provide passengers with a flexible, transparent and honest life aboard, its framework enables people to transform and engage the watercraft with the sea.

Posted on Monday, February 23, 2015 by Laura Braun

Archinect's Get Lectured is back in session! Get Lectured is an ongoing series where we feature a school's lecture series—and their snazzy posters—for the current term. Check back frequently to keep track of any upcoming lectures you don't want to miss.

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Posted on Monday, February 23, 2015 by Laura Braun

“I will sit and sketch and then will quickly try to make a digital draft, print something out, make another model, redline it, and then go back into the computer. It’s a feedback loop between analog and digital,” she said. Gattegno believes it is this fluidity between the two methods that promotes authenticity and originality.

Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2015 by Laura Braun

What are the ethical boundaries for architecture? Architecture is one of the learned professions, like medicine or law. It requires a license, giving architects a monopoly over their practices, in return for a minimal promise that buildings won’t fall down. Raphael Sperry, the Bay Area architect who spearheaded the petition to the institute, thinks the public deserves more in return for that monopoly.

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Posted on Wednesday, February 4, 2015 by Laura Braun

As design visualization software becomes more ubiquitous and easier to use, the novelty of digital form for the sake of digital form is wearing off. These exponentially evolving conception and fabrication techniques can now be applied to existing design problems that do not traditionally involve digital technologies bring a fresh perspective to an established craft.

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Posted on Tuesday, February 3, 2015 by Jim Norrena

ACSA recently announced the 2014-15 Architectural Education Award Winners, and CCA Architecture faculty member Neal Schwartz is the recipient of the 2014-15 ACSA Diversity Achievement Award.

Each year ACSA honors architectural educators for exemplary work in areas such as building design, community collaborations, scholarship, and service.

Schwartz won for his work with the Q-Arc initiative at CCA, part of a broader effort to expand diversity collegewide through the discussion of LGBTQ issues.

Posted on Tuesday, February 3, 2015 by Jim Norrena

ACSA recently announced the 2014-15 Architectural Education Award Winners, and CCA Architecture faculty member Neal Schwartz is the recipient of the 2014-15 ACSA Diversity Achievement Award.

Each year ACSA honors architectural educators for exemplary work in areas such as building design, community collaborations, scholarship, and service.

Schwartz won for his work with the Q-Arc initiative at CCA, part of a broader effort to expand diversity collegewide through the discussion of LGBTQ issues.

Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2015 by Laura Braun

Then there’s Protos Eyewear, a company with a similar mission. It uses an algorithm to tailor eyeglasses to a customer’s unique features and uses images of the customers to help with the customization. Protos founding partner Richart Ruddie tells Digital Trends the venture was created by a group of industrial designers and architects at California College of the Arts in San Francisco.

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Posted on Monday, January 26, 2015 by Laura Braun

A team of students at California College of the Arts (CCA) in San Francisco has developed autonomous, mobile 3D printing robots that could some day be put to work building in outlying areas. The Swarmscapers, as the small robots are called, are capable of traversing difficult terrain and they work with found materials to build shapes and structures. Some day, these little robotscould be used to construct entire buildings.

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Posted on Monday, January 26, 2015 by Laura Braun

At California College of the Arts, Jason Kelly Johnson and Michael Shiloh have been leading students inresearch that is developing small Arduino-powered robots that can 3D print on rough terrain, and where traditional construction is hindered by logistics such as access or climate. The research is evolving at a breathtaking pace, and students Clayton Muhleman, Alan Cation, and Adithi Satish have built the latest project, called "Swarmscrapers," which you can download as an Instructable.

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