Architecture News

Posted on Tuesday, September 23, 2014 by Laura Braun

This rustic cabin, located in Topanga Canyon in California, was designed by Mason St. Peter—a graduate of the California College of the Arts in San Francisco. While visiting a friend in a similar studio, St. Peter was inspired and began to work with the owner to create a space of their own using his materials. 

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Posted on Thursday, September 4, 2014 by Laura Braun

The 3rd Space collective’s members comprise architectural designer Shalini Agrawal of California College of the Arts, San Jose State University art professor Robin Lasser and California College of the Arts instructor Trena Noval, all from the Bay Area; and Billava, educator Arzu Mistry, artist Anuradha Nalapat and Indian Ministry of Culture senior fellow Lalitha Shankar, all from Bangalore.

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Posted on Wednesday, August 27, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

Not long ago, while visiting a friend in Nicaragua, Aaron Poritz (Architecture 2008) stumbled upon a large source of excellent wood: vast quantities of exotic trees felled by Hurricane Felix.

Before going to Nicaragua, Poritz had designed furniture only as a hobby, but he was so impressed with the country’s local craftsmen that he decided to start his own furniture company.

The resulting 30-piece wood furniture collection has garnered important recognition from Forbes magazine, who put him on a recent Forbes “30 under 30” list. In 2013 the Red Hen, a highly popular Washington DC restaurant, commissioned Poritz to source and fabricate all of its custom chairs and bar stools, tables, benches, plank flooring, ceiling, and even baby bar stools. Each piece has expressive twists and geometric connections.

All of Poritz’s work emphasizes strength, comfort, sustainability, quality, and design. These principles, he says, were instilled in him at CCA. While a student, he participated in the design of Refract House for the 2009 Solar Decathlon.

He was recently asked to be an artist in residence at the the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, and designed a sitting stool for their gallery, He currently divides his time between New York and Managua.

Read more at the artist's website »

Article by Steffie Guan

Posted on Tuesday, August 26, 2014 by Laura Braun

One student, named Evan Kuester, wanted to do just that for his friend Ivania Castillo. Kuester, is currently studying for his Master’s Degree in Architecture with a specialty in digital fabrication at the California College of the Arts. When he met Ivania, he immediately got the idea of creating a custom prosthetic arm for her, that would be different than anything ever created. He wanted to create something that would be both useful and eye-appealing. He didn’t want to just 3D print something that was already available on the internet.

Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 by Laura Braun

Dana Harel was born in 1970, raised in Tel Aviv, Israel, and works in San Francisco. She received her Bachelor of Architecture from California College of the Arts. Her recent solo exhibitions have been at Gallery Wendi Norris in San Francisco and Herzliya Museum of Contemporary Art in Herzliya, Israel. Harel’s work has been included in numerous group exhibitions at Headlands Center for the Arts in Sausalito; the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art in San Jose; Napa Valley Museum in Napa, and Root Division and Gen Art, both in San Francisco. 

Posted on Tuesday, July 29, 2014 by Laura Braun

I built this Eames-like chair without touching a single traditional woodworking tool. No, it's not because I'm some kind of Luddite. I just love the immediacy of rendering a chair with 3D modeling software and then cutting out the parts with a CNC machine. Everything snaps together like flat-pack furniture, but without the cheesy fasteners—just mechanically sound through tenons and lap joints. The manufacturing process takes 2 hours.

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Posted on Wednesday, July 23, 2014 by Jim Norrena

Volatile Mutation earns honorable mention at TEX-FABView slideshow 

Congratulations to third-year MArch students Alan Cation and Dustin Tisdale and alum Tim Henshaw-Plath (MArch 2014) for earning honorable mention for their Volatile Mutation project at this year's TEX-FAB Plasticity competition.

Posted on Monday, July 7, 2014 by Rachel Walther

Frank Merritt and Teri Gardiner [Photo: Rachel Walther]

Frank Merritt (Architecture 1999) and Teri Gardiner (Graphic Design 2001) are both CCA alumni. Merritt is a principal at Jensen Architects, based in San Francisco. Gardiner is the marketing and communications manager at Richmond Art Center; she also maintains an active freelance graphic design practice.

They met through mutual CCA friends and married in 2009. They live in the lower Nob Hill / upper Tenderloin neighborhood of San Francisco and run the alternative/experimental gallery Ramon’s Tailor, located at 628 Jones Street.

CCA: What was the inspiration for starting Ramon’s Tailor in 2011? You are already both very busy people!

Frank: Ironically, the inspiration came out of working really long days. I was overwhelmed. I love my job -- I get to be creative and work with great people -- but I wasn’t making time for myself.

Then I read about Ray Oldenburg’s concept of a “third  place.” In addition to your workplace and your home, he says, to have a good life balance you need a third space: the barbershop, the gym, anything.

Posted on Monday, June 23, 2014 by Laura Braun

David Gissen is a historian and theorist of architecture, His work focuses on developing a novel concept of nature in architectural thought and developing experimental forms of architectural and urban historical practice. He is the author of the books Subnature (2009) and Manhattan Atmospheres (2014) and numerous essays and book chapters. He is an associate professor at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco.

Posted on Monday, June 23, 2014 by Laura Braun

California College of the Arts architecture student Lujac Desautel re-examines traditional yacht design with GLASS, a beautifully minimalist concept that utilizes stacked levels to create a sleek, sculptural form. Inspired by interlocking LEGO blocks as wall as the architecture of skyscrapers, the ship is organized vertically by three cubic volumes, allowing for the maximizing of living space for guests and crew members.​

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