CCA News

Posted on Monday, December 26, 2005 by Jim Norrena

Do your best work.
Show your best work.
Push your practice forward.

This is the opportunity to continue your education. Why did you go to years of art school? What were you trying to accomplish? Don't lose your vision of this.

The important tools you developed in school were your studio practice and your community. Now you can evolve and extend both of these tools.

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Posted on Tuesday, December 20, 2005 by Brenda Tucker

The recruitment process is underway to find 25 West Oakland families for the fourth and final phase of "100 Families Oakland: Art & Social Change," a multiphase community art project, sponsored by F. Noel Perry and the Center for Art and Public Life at California College of the Arts (CCA). The families will come together at the M. Robinson Baker YMCA, located at 3265 Market Street in Oakland, as part of the Attitudinal Healing Connection's ArtEsteem Program.

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Posted on Friday, December 16, 2005 by Brenda Tucker

Ralph Rugoff

Ralph Rugoff, director of the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, is the winner of the inaugural Ordway Prize in the category of arts writer and/or curator. This new prize, awarded by the Penny McCall Foundation, is one of the most generous international art prizes awarded in the United States. Given biennially, it recognizes two recipients, a midcareer artist and an arts writer and/or curator, each of whom will receive an unrestricted monetary award of $100,000. Doris Salcedo was the recipient of the Ordway Prize in the artist category.

Ralph Rugoff commented, "It is an unbelievable honor to receive the Ordway Prize. I am deeply grateful to Jennifer McSweeney and the Penny McCall Foundation for their foresight in establishing this prize and for their ongoing support of contemporary art and artists. It was a privilege to be nominated along with my distinguished colleagues Lynne Cooke and David Rimanelli—both of whom have had a great impact on my understanding of contemporary art. This prize also recognizes the work of the CCA Wattis Institute and the importance and relevance of its broad international focus."

About Ralph Rugoff

Since 2000, Ralph Rugoff has been director of the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts. His curatorial experience at the Wattis includes "Monuments for the USA," "Capp Street Project: 20th Anniversary Exhibition," "Baja to Vancouver: The West Coast and Contemporary Art" (with Daina Augaitis, Lisa Corrin, Matthew Higgs and Toby Kamps), and "Sudden Glory: Sight Gags and Slapstick in Contemporary Art." Rugoff was also the founding chair of CCA's Curatorial Practice Program.

Prior to coming to CCA, he co-curated (with Lisa Corrin) "The Greenhouse Effect" at the Serpentine Gallery in London. His freelance curatorial projects include "Just Pathetic," which was exhibited in Los Angeles and New York, and the touring exhibition "At the Threshold of the Visible: Minuscule and Small-Scale Art 1964-1996."

Rugoff's principal publications include monographs on George Condo, Mark Wallinger and Anya Gallacio. He is the author of "Circus Americanus" (Verso). Rugoff also served as editor and co-author of "Scene of the Crime" (MIT Press) and "At the Threshold of the Visible" (Independent Curators International). In addition, Rugoff has been a research fellow at Goldsmiths College in London and a Pew Arts Journalism Fellow at Columbia University in New York.

About the Wattis

Established in 1998, the CCA Wattis Institute serves as a forum for the presentation and discussion of leading-edge local, national and international contemporary culture. Through exhibitions, the Capp Street Project residency program, lectures, symposia, performances and publications in the fields of art, architecture and design, the CCA Wattis Institute fosters interaction among the students and faculty of California College of the Arts; art, architecture and design professionals; and the general public.

Rugoff comments, "As large museums in the United States increasingly focus on producing blockbuster shows, the task of developing truly innovative and challenging projects has been taken up by smaller, more responsive institutions like the CCA Wattis Institute. Occupying a strategic niche between artist-run spaces and museums, the Wattis Institute operates as a cultural test site or aesthetic think tank, where artists and visitors alike can experiment with new ideas about relationships among art, society, popular culture and everyday life."

About the Ordway Prize

The Ordway Prize is named in honor of McCall Foundation Director Jennifer McSweeney's great-great-aunt, Katharine Ordway, who was a philanthropist, art collector and lifelong naturalist. The prize recognizes mid-career artists and arts writers and/or curators who have made important contributions to the field of contemporary art and letters. Recipients must be at least 40 years of age and created a significant body of work over a minimum of 15 years. Nominees are considered from around the world. The short list for the 2005 Ordway Prize comprises three artists and three arts writers and/or curators selected from seven nominees in each category. The other finalists are artists Sam Durant and Senga Nengudi and curator Lynne Cooke and art critic David Rimanelli.

The nominators, who were invited by Ms. McSweeney to participate in the selection process, are a distinguished group of artists, curators, writers, museum professionals, scholars, philanthropists and leaders in the field of contemporary art.

Penny McCall Foundation

The Penny McCall Foundation (PMF), a private organization dedicated to supporting contemporary artists, arts writers, and curators, was established in 1987 by Jennifer McSweeney's late mother, Penny McCall. From 1988 to 2004, the activities of the PMF included awarding more than $2,000,000 to emerging artists, arts writers, and curators. In 2005, under Ms. McSweeney's directorship, the Foundation initiated the biennial Ordway Prize; in the intervening years, it will continue to award the Penny McCall Awards, among other initiatives.

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Posted on Thursday, December 15, 2005 by Brenda Tucker

CCA student Tony Meredith was named the U.S. winner of the Translations in Tupperware global design contest, with a beautifully lit and shot photograph entitled "Tupper Rose Window," which uses multicolored and multitextured, vintage and contemporary Tupperware bowls, coasters, and tumblers to replicate a stained-glass window. He is a student in the college's Industrial Design Program.

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Posted on Friday, December 2, 2005 by Brenda Tucker

Marilyn da Silva, Rock Paper Scissors

The work of three CCA faculty members—Lia Cook, professor of Textiles; Marilyn da Silva, chair of Jewelry/Metal Arts; and Donald Fortescue, chair of Wood/Furniture—is featured in Transformations: The Language of Craft, an international exhibition at the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra. The exhibition showcases recent work by the world's leading studio craft artists and is the first of its kind at the National Gallery. Transformations is on view through January 29, 2006.

Three years in the making, the exhibition includes 85 Australian and international artists and 135 works in the area of studio craft, including ceramics, furniture, glass, jewelry, metalwork, sculpture, textiles, and wood.

Transformations was organized by Robert Bell, senior curator of decorative arts and design at the National Gallery. Bell comments, "The work of international artists most prominent and influential in these fields is seldom seen in Australia; this exhibition offers visitors a chance to encounter their unique and compelling objects that challenge our perceptions of design and function, and the meaning of the materials they use."

Cook and Da Silva each gave presentations on their work during a two-day conference held in conjunction with the opening of the exhibition. They were among the 18 artists from Australia, the United States, Europe, and Asia who were invited to speak.

A full-color exhibition catalog is available from the National Gallery of Australia online shop. For more information, see www.nga.gov.au.

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Posted on Tuesday, November 22, 2005 by Brenda Tucker

Speaker John Danzer

Top California designers show new work at the winter 2006 Interior Designers Forum, "Beyond Green," sponsored by the Extended Education Department at California College of the Arts (CCA) and presented by best-selling design author Diane Dorrans Saeks. This dynamic, multidisciplinary forum looks "beyond green" to consider environmentally friendly design and inspiration in the broadest sense. The forum examines stylish architecture, interiors and furniture that embody wise, ecologically benign and environmentally smart practices. The speakers—seven leading interior designers, furniture designers, design practitioners and architects—will show images of their newest work and discuss their design philosophies, including aspects of the "green" house: color, sustainable materials and landscape. The forum will take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, January 28, 2006, at the CCA San Francisco campus, 1111 Eighth Street.

Sim Van der Ryn of Van der Ryn Architects is the forum's keynote speaker. The program also includes special guest speaker John Danzer of Munder-Skiles, Inc., and featured speakers Martha Angus of Martha Angus, Inc.; Olle Lundberg of Lundberg Design; Melissa Mizell of Gensler; Henry Siegel of Siegel & Strain Architects; and Anni Tilt of Arkin Tilt Architects.

Moderator Diane Dorrans Saeks is the author of 17 books, most recently "Michael Smith Elements of Style" and "Hollywood Style" (both from Rizzoli). A noted editor and lecturer, Ms. Saeks has written extensively for the New York Times, Garden Design, Departures and many other design publications around the world. She is the interior design editor of PaperCity, the San Francisco editor at large for C Magazine and the California editor of Metropolitan Home.

Please note that speakers are subject to change. The cost of the forum is $120 and will include lunch. Preregistration is required. Those interested should call (510) 594-3710 to register or receive more information.

About the College

Founded in 1907, California College of the Arts (formerly California College of Arts and Crafts) is the largest regionally accredited, independent school of art and design in the western United States. Noted for the interdisciplinary nature and breadth of its programs, CCA offers studies in 19 undergraduate and 6 graduate majors in the areas of fine arts, architecture, design and writing. The college offers bachelor of architecture, bachelor of arts, bachelor of fine arts, master of architecture, master of arts and master of fine arts degrees. With campuses in Oakland and San Francisco, CCA currently enrolls 1,600 full-time students.

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Posted on Monday, November 21, 2005 by Brenda Tucker

Ralph Rugoff

Ralph Rugoff, director of the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, was named one of three finalists for the inaugural Ordway Prize in the category of arts writer and/or curator. This new prize, awarded by the Penny McCall Foundation, is one of the most generous international art prizes awarded in the United States. Given biennially, it recognizes two recipients, a midcareer artist and an arts writer and/or curator, each of whom will receive an unrestricted monetary award of $100,000. The four remaining finalists will each receive awards of $7,500. Jennifer McSweeney, director of the Penny McCall Foundation, announced the six finalists on November 11. The award recipients will be revealed on December 16 at a special event in New York City.

Ralph Rugoff commented, "I am delighted to be considered for the Ordway Prize and honored to be nominated along such distinguished colleagues as Lynne Cooke and David Rimanelli."

About Ralph Rugoff

Since 2000, Ralph Rugoff has been director of the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts. His curatorial experience at the Wattis includes "Monuments for the USA," "Capp Street Project: 20th Anniversary Exhibition," "Baja to Vancouver: The West Coast and Contemporary Art" (with Daina Augaitis, Lisa Corrin, Matthew Higgs and Toby Kamps), and "Sudden Glory: Sight Gags and Slapstick in Contemporary Art."

Prior to coming to CCA, he co-curated (with Lisa Corrin) "The Greenhouse Effect" at the Serpentine Gallery in London. His freelance curatorial projects include "Just Pathetic," which was exhibited in Los Angeles and New York, and the touring exhibition "At the Threshold of the Visible: Minuscule and Small-Scale Art 1964-1996."

Rugoff's principal publications include monographs on George Condo, Mark Wallinger and Anya Gallacio. He is the author of "Circus Americanus" (Verso). Rugoff also served as editor and co-author of "Scene of the Crime" (MIT Press) and "At the Threshold of the Visible" (Independent Curators International).

In addition, Rugoff has been a research fellow at Goldsmiths College in London and a Pew Arts Journalism Fellow at Columbia University in New York.

About the Wattis

Established in 1998, the CCA Wattis Institute serves as a forum for the presentation and discussion of leading-edge local, national and international contemporary culture.

Through exhibitions, the Capp Street Project residency program, lectures, symposia, performances and publications in the fields of art, architecture and design, the CCA Wattis Institute fosters interaction among the students and faculty of California College of the Arts; art, architecture and design professionals; and the general public.

Rugoff comments, "As large museums in the United States increasingly focus on producing blockbuster shows, the task of developing truly innovative and challenging projects has been taken up by smaller, more responsive institutions like the CCA Wattis Institute. Occupying a strategic niche between artist-run spaces and museums, the Wattis Institute operates as a cultural test site or aesthetic think tank, where artists and visitors alike can experiment with new ideas about relationships among art, society, popular culture and everyday life."

About the Ordway Prize

The Ordway Prize is named in honor of Ms. McSweeney's great-great-aunt, Katharine Ordway, who was a philanthropist, art collector and lifelong naturalist. The prize recognizes mid-career artists and arts writers and/or curators who have made important contributions to the field of contemporary art and letters. Recipients must be at least 40 years of age and created a significant body of work over a minimum of 15 years. Nominees are considered from around the world.

The short list for the 2005 Ordway Prize comprises three artists and three arts writers and/or curators selected from seven nominees in each category. The other finalists are artists Sam Durant, Senga Nengudi and Doris Salcedo; curator Lynne Cooke and art critic David Rimanelli.

The nominators, who were invited by Ms. McSweeney to participate in the selection process, are a distinguished group of artists, curators, writers, museum professionals, scholars, philanthropists and leaders in the field of contemporary art.

Penny McCall Foundation

The Penny McCall Foundation (PMF), a private organization dedicated to supporting contemporary artists, arts writers, and curators, was established in 1987 by Jennifer McSweeney's late mother, Penny McCall. From 1988 to 2004, the activities of the PMF included awarding more than $2,000,000 to emerging artists, arts writers, and curators. In 2005, under Ms. McSweeney's directorship, the Foundation initiated the biennial Ordway Prize; in the intervening years, it will continue to award the Penny McCall Awards, among other initiatives.

Read the rest

Posted on Saturday, November 12, 2005 by Jim Norrena

“Artist is an unrealistic and audacious ambition for a lifestyle. You have to be unrealistic and dedicated,” says Hank Willis Thomas. With seven residencies throughout the United States and one in Paris under his belt, Thomas says he’s uncertain where in the world he wants to live. “I haven’t figured out where to stop.”

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Posted on Wednesday, November 2, 2005 by Brenda Tucker

Jeanne Dunning is the fall 2005 Capp Street Project artist in residence at the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts. In this exhibition, Dunning elaborates on her continuing investigation of representations of formlessness that evoke disturbing corporeal associations. Centering around a series of large-scale photographs depicting a monochrome color field (composed of smashed stewed tomatoes), Dunning's installation explores boundaries between the sublime and the grotesque, while playing on our perceptions and misperceptions of images connoting physical vulnerability.

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Posted on Thursday, October 27, 2005 by Brenda Tucker

The CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts presents world-renowned Stanford psychologist Philip Zimbardo in conversation with Polish artist Artur Żmijewski on Wednesday, November 30, at 6 p.m. in Timken Lecture Hall at the California College of the Arts San Francisco campus, 1111 Eighth Street.

This special event kicks off an exhibition of Żmijewski's 39-minute film "Repetition" (2005), a documentary recording his reenactment of Professor Zimbardo's 1971 Stanford Prison Experiment.

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