CCA News

Posted on Friday, November 21, 2008 by Jim Norrena

After motion graphics designer Lindsay Daniels graduated in 2003, she hit the ground running: "CCA was such a phenomenal thing to shape me. I have carried the principles into now, and I built off the foundation from school," she explains.

Two years after graduation, Daniels transferred from Seattle, where she has been working at the design studio Digital Kitchen as a graphic designer, to try the Big Apple on for size. "New York is so inspiring. There's so much culture and lots to offer."

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Posted on Friday, November 21, 2008 by Jim Norrena

She's massive, rotund, winged. Her vagina spews forth quarks, those infinitesimally small particles that come in and out of existence a million times a second. She's the Soft Machine, and she's the visual creation of Charles Glaubitz.

Or is she?

Glaubitz himself is not entirely sure whether, as a painter, illustrator, and installation artist, he's the author of new worlds or merely a reporter of unseen realms. He suspects that, at different times, he's both.

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Posted on Friday, November 21, 2008 by Jim Norrena

Alameda County residents are lucky to have a CCA graduate looking out for them. As executive director of the Alameda County Art Commission, Rachel Osajima uses her art school education for the public good. “I was born and raised in Oakland. I really wanted to work in the East Bay and support the arts community,” she says. Now Osajima directly oversees grants, public art, and arts education programs impacting East Bay schools, nonprofit organizations, and communities.

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Posted on Friday, November 21, 2008 by Jim Norrena

As a grade-school tyke, Steven Miller's bike-riding missions were different from those of his peers. His goal was to find people who were moving into his neighborhood so he could help them arrange their furniture. "I was the weird little kid people started calling on to make their houses look amazing," says Miller with a self-deprecating laugh.

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Posted on Friday, November 21, 2008 by Jim Norrena

Did you know that the average person, while asleep, unknowingly eats at least four spiders over the course of his or her lifetime? That gruesome statistic is the inspiration for Ignorance Is Bliss, Miriam Wilson's comedic animated short, which made it into the Cannes Film Festival this past May.

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Posted on Friday, November 21, 2008 by Jim Norrena

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p>Julie and Louis Torres met during their first year at CCA in the 1970s. “It was an incredible school. I had the most fun in my life at that time,” Julie says. Working closely with noted teachers such as Vernon Coykendall, Julie remembers doing very precise throwing work, while Louis looked to teachers such as Viola Frey to influence his sculptures. The two continue to be influenced by CCA, even after giving up ceramics to run the family flower business.

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Posted on Friday, November 21, 2008 by Jim Norrena

In 2003, Steven Utz left his job at a Walnut Creek architecture firm when his wife accepted a teaching position at Allegheny College in Meadville, PA. In addition to his design and historic preservation work, Utz began working with local nonprofit organizations. With only one architecture firm in this rural rustbelt community, he realized that "no one was focusing on low-income housing in a town where 51 percent of the families are living on less than $14,000 a year."

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Posted on Friday, November 21, 2008 by Jim Norrena

Nellie King Solomon says, "Art chooses you, you don't choose art."

Initially drawn to architecture, she studied at Cooper Union, then worked in architecture in Barcelona and New York. She is now known for large paintings created with her own handmade tools on heavy mill Mylar.

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Posted on Friday, November 21, 2008 by Jim Norrena

Geoffrey Petrizzi enjoys the unusual distinction of seeing his senior thesis project exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Two years after graduating, Petrizzi submitted his project, Aquaticus—an underwater diving scooter—to ID Magazine. His piece won a Design Distinction award in the Concepts category and caught the eye of Joe Rosa, a curator at SFMOMA, who selected it for the exhibition Body Design, on view from November 2002 through March 2003.

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Posted on Friday, November 21, 2008 by Jim Norrena

When Julie Walker and Susie Gelbron met in line during graduate student orientation, they got more than financial aid. They found a career.

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