Awards and Accolades News

Posted on Tuesday, February 3, 2015 by Jim Norrena

Jaydan Moore, "Specimens" (2013), found materials

More than a century old, CCA's Jewelry / Metal Arts Program continues to produce award-winning fine artists, as evidenced by Jaydan Moore's (BFA 2008) recent American Craft Council (ACC) Emerging Voices Award.

This is the first ACC award to recognize emerging talent among scholars, curators, and critics. In addition to cash prizes, winners will also be promoted in the June/July issue of American Craft magazine.

Posted on Friday, January 16, 2015 by Jim Norrena

In 2011 students Anna Acquistapace (DMBA 2011), Olivia Nava (DMBA 2012), and Eric Persha (DMBA 2012), launched an idea inspired by the MBA in Design Strategy program's Social Ventures course (taught by faculty member Steve Diller).

The idea involves working with members of a solar-distribution company as a partner organization to offer community members in rural Tanzania connectivity services that use renewable solar energy.

(Initially the partner organization had wanted to address better solar-powered lighting solutions in Tanzania, which evolved into the more wide-serving Juabar business model.)

"Our [CCA] education helped us realize that you don’t approach innovation by answering questions, but rather you look to understand end-users’ needs.

"So we didn’t come to that project on 'how can we better sell solar lights?' but more 'how do we understand the electricity experience of Tanzanians with little or no electricity experience?'"

Posted on Monday, January 5, 2015 by Laura Braun

A CFDA-affiliated school, its students have won many industry awards and landed jobs with marquee-name labels and companies, including Nike, Badgley Mischka and Thom Browne. There is also a notable focus on sustainable design. 

Visit source »

Posted on Friday, December 5, 2014 by Jim Norrena

The Center for Art & Public Life (The Center) and the MBA in Design Strategy program, both at California College of the Arts, last month co-organized TechRaking 7, an annual hackathon series put on by The Center for Investigative Reporting (CIR), which focused on the intersection of journalism and design.

TechRaking 7, the first within the series to work exclusively with college students (and CCA as its official partner), had CIR CEO Joaquín Alvarado reaching out to CCA to pose the question: How can we rethink human interaction around the news within our communities?

CIR enlisted colleagues from two of its local media partners -- Bruce Koon of KQED and Martin Reynolds of the Bay Area News Group (BANG) -- to challenge CCA students with some of their toughest community-engagement issues. For example, how might:

CIR create new ways for people to communicate about the role of guns in their neighborhoods?
BANG offer a more participatory model that empowers residents to share overlooked topics?
KQED develop cross-regional tools to communicate better the personal effects of the growing technology industry?

Far be it for anyone at CCA to turn away a challenge, thought leaders at The Center decided to enlist the help of CCA students -- working in small teams representing a wide range of disciplines -- to collectively come up with innovative solutions that could encourage greater public participation in today's changing news gathering and distribution policies and procedures.

In short, TechRaking 7 challenged students to give the concept of the traditional newsstand a much-needed facelift.

Posted on Monday, September 29, 2014 by Rachel Walther

Gaby Brink (BFA Graphic Design 1995) and her wife and business partner, Nathalie Destandau, started Tomorrow Partners in 2007 in West Berkeley.

Brink’s vision to partner her expertise in design with companies and organizations that are seeking sustainable solutions for projects that will benefit communities, locally or globally, has come to fruition.

* * * * *

I knew from a very early age that I was a creative person. There were no artists in my family; my father was a pilot and all of our family was in the airline industry. I didn’t think that art could be a career, but my parents were really supportive.

When in Doubt, Go to CCA

I decided to leave Switzerland and go to the U.S. to learn English and spend a year at an art school. I liked the CCA catalogue best. I moved to Oakland in 1988, and within my first year I discovered photography and decided to stay.

I experimented a lot (this was predigital) and became good at the craft of studio work. Four teachers still stand out for me: Larry Sultan was a big influence -- a great mentor and a really inspiring person!

Posted on Wednesday, September 24, 2014 by Jim Norrena

Students participate in the exhibition "An Olfactory Archive: 1738-1969"

Congratulations to CCA's Architecture division for its recent Graham Foundation grant award for its 2014 Experimental History Project, an interdisciplinary platform for exhibitions, research, and events exploring experimental practices of architectural and urban history.

About the Experimental History Project

In a written statement prepared by CCA Architecture faculty members Irene Cheng and David Gissen: "We define experimental history as historical inquiry that operates outside traditional scholarly production.

Posted on Tuesday, September 16, 2014 by Jim Norrena

Anthony Imperato with the Emmy for "Bob's Burgers"View slideshow 

What's the common factor among the following: CCA, Bento Box, Emmy Award, and Burgers?

It's Anthony Imperato (BFA Animation 2014), who works at Bento Box Entertainment, a leading producer of primetime animation for broadcast and cable networks.

Bento Box helps produce the animated FOX television comedy series Bob's Burgers, which on August 16 was awarded a Creative Arts Emmy for Outstanding Animation Program as part of the 66th Annual Emmy Awards.

The Television Academy presented live the 2014 Creative Arts Emmy Awards for programs and individual achievements at the Nokia Theatre in Los Angeles.

Posted on Thursday, September 11, 2014 by Emily Holmes

Adrienne Skye Roberts’ (MA Visual and Critical Studies 2009) installation titled It Is Our Duty to Fight, It Is Our Duty to Win / We Must Love Each Other and Protect Each Other / We Have Nothing to Loose But Our Chains (2013), shown at San Francisco’s Root Division gallery, depicted the following words on a sign that rested against a white wall:

“To be treated like everybody else.”

Hand painted in simple black lettering on a white picketing sign, it is easy to imagine these words chanted with pride, determination, and defiance during a political march.

Listen to a recorded audio of the chant »

Five other similar signs featured different statements and demands, such as “The hope to see my children again.” The people who spoke these words did not always have the freedom to practice the civil right of protesting.

In fact, the work reflects the answers of previously incarcerated women whom Roberts asked, “How did you survive prison?” “What do you need to survive now that you are out?” “And what does a world without mass incarceration look like?”

Visit the artist's website »

Posted on Sunday, August 17, 2014 by Dustin N. Smith

Emma Ulen-Klees (BFA Printmaking), Progression, 2014View slideshow 

California College of the Arts alumna Emma Ulen-Klees (BFA Printmaking 2014) was awarded a 2014 Hamaguchi Emerging Artist Residency at Kala.

The artist in residence at Kala Art Institute is funded by the Hamaguchi Endowment for the advancement of printmaking at CCA and by the Kala Art Institute.

The award represents a rich collaboration between the two institutions that creates a special opportunity for a recent BFA Printmaking graduate to work in the dynamic Kala facilities with a community of artists from all over the world.

While studying printmaking and visual studies at CCA, Ulen-Klees began to develop a conceptual body of work inspired by the juxtaposition of natural and urban landscapes and uses the multiple to further explore human relationships to ecology within their manufactured environments.


Posted on Tuesday, August 12, 2014 by Jim Norrena

KPCB fellow Ben Wasserman at Flipboard in Palo Alto

“I didn’t know that it would lead to one of the most successful and exciting summers of my life,” says Ben Wasserman (Graphic Design 2015), referring to his offer letter from Flipboard, a Palo Alto-based startup, in late spring confirming his acceptance to the Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers (KPCB) Fellows Program.

Wasserman was one of only 11 applicants (out of 2,500) accepted to the design fellowship program, which is led by design and technology pioneer John Meada. Applications come in from more than 200 universities across the Unites States.

KPCB fellows attend private events hosted by portfolio companies, where they meet talented engineering and design luminaries from across Silicon Valley. Coverage of the program has been included in FastCompanyTechCrunchBusiness InsiderInc. and Gigaom

KPCB partners with some of the brightest entrepreneurs to turn disruptive ideas into world-changing businesses. The firm has helped build pioneering companies like Amazon, Electronic Arts, Genentech, Google, Nest, and Twitter.