Bookshelf News

Posted on Wednesday, June 18, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

Grand Theft Vito
Concrete Press, 2014
Paperback, 234 pages, $99

Between July 3 and 25, 2013, the San Francisco-based artists COLL.EO (comprised of Visual Studies faculty member Matteo Bittanti and partner in crime Colleen Flaherty) walked through the streets of Liberty City, the fictional metropolis of Grand Theft Auto IV, under the guise of Vito Acconci. Titled Following Bit, the performance was meant as a replay of Acconci’s seminal Following Piece (1969). Forty-four years earlier, Acconci followed for an entire month a random person each day in New York, stopping only if they entered a private space. Acconci typed up an account of each "pursuit" and sent a report to a different member of the art community the subsequent month.

COLL.EO’s 2013 replay generated an enormous set of data, consisting of 23 digital videos in high definition over 118 gigabytes in size; 13,300+ digital photos; 60 digital prints; 23 written accounts sent in tweet form, plus several typewritten pages of notes, framed and mounted to a board.

A Game Art walkthrough, this book provides a unique, in-depth documentation of Following Bit and the related art mod Grand Theft Vito (2013) through texts, screengrabs, annotations, and a long conversation between COLL.EO and the San Francisco-based artist Carlo Ricafort.

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Posted on Wednesday, June 18, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

If You Knew What I Know It Would Be Strange
Arkitip, 2013
Paperback, 50 pages, $10

This book was published on the occasion of Jason Jagel’s (Painting 1995) exhibition The Bitter End in Paris. The exhibition continues Jägel’s life-long relationship to making art as a part of the daily function of living. His work is a theatrical enactment of an ongoing, never-ending conversation with himself, regarding the nature of reality and his place within it. Jägel takes inspiration from artists traveling deep down their own wormhole: Kurt Schwitters, Bruce Connor, Chris Ware, Otis Jackson Jr., and Philip Guston. This was his first exhibition in Paris.

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Posted on Wednesday, June 18, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

Take Me With You
The Thing Quarterly, 2014
Book/Bag, 72 pages, $65

Take Me With You, published by The Thing Quarterly, is a limited edition book/bag consisting of two complementary parts:

Part #1 is a sturdy 10 oz. cotton canvas tote silkscreened with the start of the graphic short story “Take Me With You” by CCA alumnus Jason Jagël (Painting 1995). The story begins on the front and back of the bag and continues within, where . . .

Part #2 continues the story within a 72-page, perfect-bound, full-color book that is contained within a special interior pocket sewn into the tote.

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Posted on Wednesday, June 18, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

Modern Originals: At Home with Mid-Century European Designers
Rizzoli, 2014
Hardcover, 224 pages, $50

Volume Inc. (whose principal is Graphic Design faculty member Eric Heiman) designed this new book of photographs by Leslie Williamson. The pictures are of the homes of midcentury European designers -- some iconic, some unknown -- and they reveal an inspiring personal approach to modernism. Many of the homes are usually closed to the public. The featured designers include Le Corbusier, Alvar Aalto, Finn Juhl, Robin and Lucienne Day, and Gae Aulenti.

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Posted on Wednesday, June 18, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

A Walk Among the Bogus
Lavender Ink, 2014
Paperback, 150 pages, $16

First Year faculty member Elizabeth Leger made the artwork, titled Sneaky Pete, for the cover of a new poetry anthology by the Bay Area poet Owen Hill. Leger says: “It affords a glimpse at the people who walk through this book of poems. Some are from old Hollywood, some are has-beens and would-bes, others are charming denizens of the street.”

About the book: “Owen Hill’s short satirical poems make their point with sly insouciance. Gleaned from many years of chapbooks, pamphlets, and appearances in underground literary magazines they nudge, prod, delight, and sometimes stop just short of insult. Hill is also a crime fiction writer and there’s a more than subtle whiff of the mean streets in his verse.”

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Posted on Wednesday, January 29, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

Polaroids from Haiti
Nazraeli Press, 2014
Hardcover, 16 pages, $100

The photographs in Jim Goldberg (Photography faculty) contribution to Nazraeli Press’s One Picture Book series (this is number 84), Polaroids from Haiti, were taken during a week in March 2013. They depict Haitians dealing with their everyday struggles. Goldberg, who describes himself as a documentary storyteller, spent this time traveling throughout the country listening to and photographing Haitian life.  The resulting images reflect the continuing challenges and undying spirit of this impoverished country, when the 2010 earthquake is still reverberating. The publication is limited to 500 numbered copies, each one with an original signed Polaroid by Goldberg.

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Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

Manhattan Atmospheres
University of Minnesota Press, 2014
Paperback, 240 pages, $30

From the 1960s to the early 1980s, New York’s great park networks; its sanitarian projects of light, air, and water; and its monumental public works were falling apart. Images of flooded streets, blackened air, collapsed highways, and burning buildings characterize our understanding of the city’s landscape throughout this period.

At the same time, architects reimagined interior spaces as a response to these urban disasters. In this book, Architecture faculty member David Gissen reveals this chapter in New York’s environmental history that was unfolding inside the city’s gleaming late-modern architecture.

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Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

Rich and Poor
Steidl, 2014
Hardcover, 256 pages, $65

From 1977 to 1985, Jim Goldberg (Photography faculty) photographed the wealthy and the destitute of San Francisco, creating a visual document—a combination of text and photographs—that has since become a landmark work. In 1984 the series was exhibited alongside Robert Adams and Joel Sternfeld in the Three Americans exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and it was published the following year by Random House.

Out of print since 1985, Rich and Poor has been completely redesigned and expanded by the artist for Steidl. Available for the first time in hardcover, it now features a surplus of vintage material and contemporary photographs that have never been published or exhibited. The photographs constitute a shocking and gripping portrait of America in the 1970s and 1980s that remains just as relevant today.

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Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

Wilderness
University of New Mexico Press, 2014
Hardcover, 128 pages, $50

Graphic Design faculty member Bob Aufuldish designed this monograph of Debra Bloomfield's work. A five-year project, it chronicles her photographic journeys into the landscape to an old forest in Alaska. A soundscape CD is part of the book, allowing the reader to share Bloomfield's journey: hearing the call of the common crow, the crunch of snow underfoot, and the hum of a ferry’s engine. There are essays by Lauren E. Oakes, Rebecca A. Senf, and Terry Tempest Williams
Wilderness.

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Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

Celluloid Salutations
BlazeVOX, 2014
Paperback, 142 pages, $16

Celluloid Salutations is the second book by alumna Elizabeth Block (MFA Writing 2002, MFA 2003).

Juliana Spahr says: “It’s all here: love, work, child. And the writing. Mainly the writing. It takes over all these other things and yet it is built out of all these things. This is how Elizabeth Block erases Elizabeth Block, as one poem claims. She does this automatically, animalistically, while wailing forward, gracefully and with improvisation.

Bill Berkson says: “Elizabeth Block’s poetry moves through those ‘layers of noise’ we all contend with and goes a long way toward conquering by absorbing them. Page by page, the intervals, apparent blanks and interruptions between word clusters, vibrate tellingly with each tabulation of event, the actuality in and of the words as Block arranges them. Here is urgency and nuance. The matter never gets figured out we want it to we think all day long on. Take time to read this magnetic book.

The cover artwork is by noted CCA alumna Amanda Hughen (Graphic Design 1999).

Block won the Christopher Isherwood Foundation Fiction Fellowship for her first novel, A Gesture Through Time, which was fiscally sponsored by Intersection for the Arts. She was a Poets & Writers grantee for the presentation of new work at the Lab in San Francisco.

Block has won many other awards and residencies, including an award from Poets & Writers and another from the Djerassi Resident Artists Program Tread of Angels Fellowship. Her writing has appeared on stage, in film, in public art, in books, on audio CD and podcasts.

She is also a filmmaker whose film poems have traveled extensively throughout the United States and elsewhere. She has published work in many genres and in many journals, and her work has also appeared on the public radio stations KQED and KSFR. She often collaborates with musicians and visual artists.

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