Bookshelf News

Posted on Monday, July 25, 2011 by Lindsey Westbrook

Terrence Malick: Film and Philosophy
Continuum, 2011
Hardcover, 240 pages, $130

Terrence Malick's four feature films have been celebrated by critics and adored as instant classics among film aficionados, but the body of critical literature devoted to them has remained surprisingly small in comparison to Malick's stature in the world of contemporary film. Critical Studies faculty Stuart Kendall edits this volume in which Malick's films are discussed as individual objects, as a corpus, within contemporary film studies, and within a wider cultural discussion. Each of the essays is grounded in film studies, philosophical inquiry, and the emerging field of scholarship that combines the two disciplines.

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Posted on Monday, July 11, 2011 by Lindsey Westbrook

The Best Women's Travel Writing 2011
Travelers' Tales, 2011
Paperback, 352 pages, $18.95

Marianne Rogoff (Writing and Literature faculty) contributes the short story "Common Tongues" to the latest edition of The Best Women's Travel Writing. The story takes place in the context of a week-long writers' retreat in Todos Santos, Mexico. After an evening's bickering and mean margarita workshop, the characters devolve into foreign-language laughter dialogues with the Latvians who have moved into the rooms next door at Hotel California. Other stories in the book tell of wild horses in the American Southwest, riding the backroads of old China on a motorcycle, walking the walk of Muslim women in Egypt, fighting it out in a kung fu monastery in China, discovering the hidden magic of Flamenco in Spain, and more.

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Posted on Monday, July 11, 2011 by Lindsey Westbrook

The Exhibitionist: Issue 3
Archive Books, 2011
Magazine, 64 pages, $15

The Exhibitionist, edited by CCA Wattis Institute director Jens Hoffmann and designed by Graphic Design faculty member Jon Sueda, is a journal focusing solely on the practice of exhibition making. Its objective is to create a wider platform for the discussion of curatorial concerns, encourage a diversification of curatorial models, and actively contribute to the formation of a theory of curating. This issue features articles by What, How & for Whom/WHW, Victoria Noorthoorn, Lars Bang Larsen, Carol Yinghua Lu, Jessica Morgan, and Elisabeth Sussman.

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Posted on Monday, July 11, 2011 by Lindsey Westbrook

Give Them the Picture
CCA, 2011
Paperback, 203 pages, $20

Give Them the Picture collects and places in dialogue 24 articles penned by critics and artists that originally appeared in La Mamelle / ART COM magazine in the 1970s and 1980s. The authors include magazine founder Carl Loeffler, Lynn Hershman, Richard Irwin, Anna Couey, Linda Montano, Douglas Davis, Eleanor Antin, and others. It is conceived as a literary extension of the Graduate Program in Curatorial Practice 2011 thesis exhibition, and thus also features conversations between the student curators and two of La Mamelle / ART COM's key figures, Nancy Frank and Darlene Tong. The book is a copublication between the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts and the Graduate Program in Curatorial Practice.

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Posted on Monday, July 11, 2011 by Lindsey Westbrook

NONOBJECT
The MIT Press, 2010
Hardcover / iPad app, 207 pages, $29.95/$24.99

What happens when we think beyond the object, beyond the business plan, beyond what we think we know about design? In this book that is also an iPad app, coauthors Barry Katz (Industrial Design faculty) and Branko Lukic take us on a tour of the charged spaces between people and the objects they use, the mysteries of this immaterial reality. View a series of explorations of objects from the future, derived from as-yet-undiscovered materials, imagined manufacturing processes, and invented rules. Product design meets philosophy, poetry, and the theater of the imagination.

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Posted on Monday, July 11, 2011 by Lindsey Westbrook

History's Shadow
Nazraeli Press, 2011
Hardcover, 72 pages, $75

David Maisel’s (MFA 2006) work has always been concerned with processes of memory, excavation, and transformation. In the History’s Shadow series, Maisel re-photographs, then scans and digitally manipulates, X-rays from museum archives that depict artifacts from antiquity. X-rays have historically been used by art conservators for structural examination of art and artifacts much as physicians examine bones and internal organs; they reveal losses, replacements, construction methods, and internal trauma invisible to the naked eye. Maisel's mages seem like transmissions from the distant past, both spanning and collapsing time. The book, designed by Graphic Design faculty member Bob Aufuldish, contains an original short story by Jonathan Lethem that was inspired by Maisel's images. It was named one of American Photo magazine's Best Photography Books of the Year!

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Posted on Monday, July 11, 2011 by Lindsey Westbrook

The Student Annual: MBA in Design Strategy
CCA DMBA, 2010
Paperback, 92 pages, $25

A collection of projects, articles, and documentation by students in the second year of CCA's groundbreaking MBA in Design Strategy program. The book shows off the best of the student work and demonstrates the skills and abilities resulting from the program. It is edited by program chair Nathan Shedroff.

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Posted on Monday, July 11, 2011 by Lindsey Westbrook

The Ends of Art and Design
Infra-Thin Press, 2011
Paperback, 108 pages, $14.75

The design arts are to our age of experience what the fine arts were to the era of representation, but with crucial differences. Whereas the fine arts offered critical-reflective experiences to independent subjects within the era of representation, the design fields now produce experience-events in a post-subjective world. Stuart Kendall (Visual Studies faculty) proposes a new way to think about the relationship between design and culture as well as new roles for design education within the Humanities, and for the Humanities within design education. If the design fields are the primary agents of contemporary culture, they should be the primary focus of contemporary cultural studies.

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Posted on Monday, July 11, 2011 by Lindsey Westbrook

Dubrovnik under Siege: Artists' Interactions with the Old City during the Yugoslav Army Aggression 1991-1992
LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing, 2010
Paperback, 76 pages, $68

Following attacks by the Yugoslav Army in 1991, local artists used the Old City of Dubrovnik -- its ruins, boarded-up monuments, and shop windows -- to create site-specific public artworks. Nensi Brailo (Visual and Critical Studies alumna) looks at three case studies to explore this phenomenon: the site-specific exhibitions of artist Ivo Grbic on the grounds of his home and studio which had been bombed, the impromptu collaborative public art project by professional and amateur artists that took place during Christmastime in December 1991, and Pavo Urban's photographs of the besieged city's architecture and citizens.

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Posted on Monday, July 11, 2011 by Lindsey Westbrook

Peril as Architectural Enrichment
Kelsey Street Press, 2011
Paperback, 96 pages, $16.95

Hazel White (Writing alumna) tests landscape as the subject of experience in Peril as Architectural Enrichment. She questions how limbs want to move in space, when convivial with landforms, treetops, views, and pollen. The poems greet danger -- chopped narratives, lost crops, a fall, inundation -- and the refuge of a familiar curvature: the turning of long lines becoming the same as building shelter in the wild where a peril can be seen and felt, and to write is to know what's near. Like a designed landscape, White's poetry delivers a new sense of orientation.

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