Bookshelf News

Posted on Monday, February 22, 2010 by Lindsey Westbrook

Genius Loci
Lulu, 2009
Paperback, 54 pages, $23

Produced in conjunction with Donald Fortescue's (Furniture chair) solo exhibition at the Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, this catalog features numerous recent works that combine traditional design and craft techniques with new media such as digital imaging, embedded video, and manipulated sound. Fortescue is particularly interested 17th- and 18th-century cabinets of curiosity, with their combinations of New World natural discoveries and Old World craftsmanship.

Posted on Monday, February 22, 2010 by Lindsey Westbrook

The Electric Image: After the End of Photography
Powerhouse Books, 2008
Hardcover, 96 pages, $40

The photographic art of Chris Kitze explores how digital representation has contributed to the transformation and globalization of culture. Designed by Jeremy Mende (Graphic Design faculty), The Electric Image showcases digitally manipulated images by Kitze that expand our awareness of the new visual mythology created by the virtual realities that surround us.

Posted on Monday, February 22, 2010 by Lindsey Westbrook

Design Is the Problem: The Future of Design Must Be Sustainable
Rosenfeld Media, 2009
Paperback/PDF, 352 pages, $36/$22

Designers today have an unprecedented opportunity to make meaningful, sustainable change in the world—if they know how to focus their skills, time, and agendas. Nathan Shedroff (MBA in Design Strategy chair) examines how the endemic culture of design often creates unsustainable solutions, and how designers can "bake" sustainability into their processes.

Posted on Monday, February 22, 2010 by Lindsey Westbrook

Kuth/Ranieri Architects
Princeton Architectural Press, 2010
Paperback, 192 pages, $40

Featuring texts by Ila Berman (director of Architecture) and Mitchell Schwarzer (Visual Studies faculty), this installment of the New Voices in Architecture series documents the rise of Byron Kuth (CCA trustee) and Elizabeth Ranieri (Architecture faculty), described by San Francisco magazine as "the thoughtful, versatile, low-key, detail-obsessed exceptions" in "a world obsessed with an international cast of ego-driven starchitects." The book presents the breadth of their work, from the constructed to the theoretical, in stunning photographs and thought-provoking drawings.

Posted on Monday, February 22, 2010 by Lindsey Westbrook

Imaginative Feats Literally Presented: Three Fables for Video Projection
Cantor Fitzgerald Gallery, 2009
PDF, 29 pages, free

The seductive, disquieting video installations of Jeanne C. Finley (Media Arts faculty) and John Muse create tension among visual, auditory, documentary, and narrative elements. This exhibition catalog, designed by Ellen Gould (Graphic Design 2001), documents Finley and Muse's presentation at Haverford College in 2008 and includes an essay by Irina Leimbacher.

Posted on Monday, February 22, 2010 by Lindsey Westbrook

Witness #7
Nazraeli Press, 2009
Hardcover, 96 pages, $40

As guest editor of Witness #7, Todd Hido (Photography faculty) juxtaposes his own photographs of the vacant interiors of foreclosed homes—the first time this series has been published as a group—with portraits made by the Polish photographer Leon Borensztein in the 1980s. Hido's potent and surreal pictures of empty spaces include traces of lives previously lived, and Borensztein's portraits (set against generic backdrops in homes and businesses in Stockton, Fresno, and Bakersfield) metaphorically give form to the evicted families.

Posted on Monday, February 22, 2010 by Lindsey Westbrook

Margo Humphrey
Pomegranate Communications, 2009
Hardcover, 101 pages, $35

Using bold colors and powerful visual metaphors, Margo Humphrey (Painting, Printmaking 1970) channels her personal experiences growing up as an African American woman to create prints that engage broader narratives of race, gender, spirituality, and relationships. In this richly illustrated installment in the David C. Driskell Series of African American Art, author Adrienne L. Childs considers the unique blend of autobiography and fantasy in Humphrey's work, from her early abstractions to her more recent figurative lithographs.

Posted on Monday, February 22, 2010 by Lindsey Westbrook

Re/Positionierung: Critical Whiteness / Perspectives of Color
NGBK, 2009
Paperback, 320 pages, 9 Euros

How might unconscious racial dynamics affect political and artistic practice in contemporary Germany? Re/Positionierung is a multifaceted collaboration between Neue Gesellschaft für Bildende Kunst (NGBK) and the artist group Metanationale presented in German and English, documenting presentations, performances, and dialogues with the aim of inspiring self-reflection and re/positionings among cultural producers and decision makers. It features an essay and artwork by Rajkamal Kahlon (Painting/Drawing faculty).

Posted on Monday, February 22, 2010 by Lindsey Westbrook

Me Vibration
CreateSpace, 2009
Paperback, 168 pages, $8.95

Influenced by the writings of Ram Dass, Paramahansa Yogananda, and Timothy Leary, Michele Palley (MFA 1996) has developed a vibrational practice that promotes healing and health. This book, she says, has helped many individuals end addictions, save their relationships, reach life goals, and become a fuller sum of Some of the One That Is.

Posted on Monday, February 22, 2010 by Lindsey Westbrook

Allison Smith: Needle Work
University of Chicago Press, 2010
Paperback, 64 pages, $15

Allison Smith (Sculpture faculty) critically engages popular forms of historical reenactment and artifacts through sculpture, textiles, ceramics, photography, and other media. This catalog accompanies her solo exhibition at the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum at Washington University. The works take masklike forms, intertwining the horrific and the playful and questioning essential notions of camouflage and masquerade. The project also includes staged photographic portraits of the remade masks being worn, held, or positioned as props, and a set of silk parachutes printed with patterns based on early masks, further engaging the material culture of war.

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