Bookshelf News

Posted on Tuesday, December 18, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

Zygote Quarterly
Issuu, 2012
Digital, free

Thomas McKeag (Industrial Design faculty) cofounded the digital magazine Zygote Quarterly earlier this year. The magazine is devoted to the nexus of science and design, where they meet in biologically inspired problem solving. It focuses on the informed professional and presents material that is at a level between the peer-reviewed journal and the popular press. In 2012 it was nominated by the Digital Magazine Awards in two categories, Launch of the Year and Science and Nature, competing against magazines such as Scientific American and New Scientist.

Read the rest

Posted on Tuesday, December 18, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

Passion for Place: Community Reflections on the Carmel River Watershed
Risingleaf Impressions, 2012
Hardcover/Paperback, 200 pages, $85/$49.50

Passion for Place: Community Reflections on the Carmel River Watershed is a bioregional anthology with a global vision, edited and published by Paola Berthoin (Printmaking 1983). It features 37 authors and eight additional individuals featured on a CD of excerpts from interviews mixed with natural sounds from the watershed.

It includes Berthoin's plein air paintings and photographs and works by two local artists, Pamela Takigawa and Anne Greene.

Read the rest

Posted on Friday, December 14, 2012 by Jim Norrena

Humble Pie, Volume 7, the undergraduate literary magazine of California College of the Arts, was released December 2012.

About Humble Pie

The literary journal features fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and visual art. It's made for and by students, many of whom are Writing and Literature majors, but also features the work of other Bay Area undergraduate students.

Read the rest

Posted on Tuesday, October 16, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

Graphic Design student Mai Ogiya interned at Chronicle Books and designed these two picture books for kids under the supervision of Michael Morris (Graphic Design 2004).

The Story of Christmas features intricate scissor-cut illustrations by Pamela Dalton to follow the story of the nativity from the appearance of the angel to the shepherds who came from the fields and the three wise men who followed the star to pay respects to their new king. The artwork is in the Pennsylvania-German folk-art tradition, with many highly details animals and figures.

Chloe, Instead is the first picture book by Micah Player, an illustrator living in Los Angeles who previously worked at Paul Frank Industries as a designer and creative director. The book tells the story of Molly, who always dreamed of having a sister just like her. But she got Chloe, instead. These two sisters are nothing alike: Molly loves to color with crayons. Chloe prefers the taste of wax. Molly loves to read. Chloe prefers to nibble a book's spine. Molly is frustrated! But then she realizes that maybe sisters aren't the ones next to you on the piano bench, they're the ones dancing to the music you play.

Read the rest

Posted on Tuesday, October 16, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

Homage to Etel Adnan
Post-Apollo Press, 2012
Paperback, 104 pages, $15

Steve Dickison (Writing and Literature faculty) coedited, designed, and is a contributor to the anthology Homage to Etel Adnan. This collection of original essays and poetry is a tribute to Lebanese American poet, novelist, essayist, and visual artist Etel Adnan (author of The Arab Apocalypse, Sitt Marie Rose, and Master of the Eclipse, among many other books), published on the occasion of her being selected to receive the Lifetime Achievement Award from Small Press Traffic Literary Arts Center in San Francisco.

Read the rest

Posted on Monday, October 15, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

Work from California
Moravian Gallery, 2012
Paperback, 64 pages, $5

Graphic Design faculty member Jon Sueda curated the exhibition this catalogue documents, and edited and designed the book. It features the work of numerous exceptional graphic designers who are based in California and make work that directly interprets or reflects upon California as subject matter. The featured designers include CCA faculty members Bob Aufuldish, Jeremy Mende, Martin Venezky, Eric Heiman, Christopher Simmons, Emily McVarish, Geoff Kaplan, Brett McFadden, and Scott Thorpe, and recent alumnus James Edmondson. Graduate Design faculty member Megan Lynch also contributed interviews to the publication. The show took place at the 25th International Biennial of Graphic Design Brno in the Czech Republic in 2012.

To order the book, please email marie.pazderkova@moravska-galerie.cz.

Read the rest

Posted on Monday, October 15, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons from Science Fiction
Rosenfeld Media, 2012
Paperback/PDF, $39

Many designers enjoy seeing the interfaces created for science fiction films and television shows. Freed from the rigorous constraints of designing for real users, sci-fi production designers develop blue-sky interfaces that are inspiring, humorous, and even instructive. By carefully studying these "outsider" user interfaces, designers can derive lessons that make their real-world designs more cutting edge and successful.

In Make It So, MBA in Design Strategy chair Nathan Shedroff and coauthor Christopher Noessel discuss how sci-fi interfaces have been there (almost) from the beginning; sci-fi creates a shared design language that sets audience expectations; if an interface works for an audience, there's something there that will work for users; and bad sci-fi interfaces can sometimes be the most inspiring. The book sets forth 150 lessons and 10 "meta-lessons" across hundreds of examples that developers can use to enhance their real-world interfaces.

Read the rest

Posted on Monday, October 15, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

California Design 1930-1965: Living in a Modern Way
MIT Press, 2011
Hardcover, 360 pages, $60

Fashion Design and Visual Studies faculty member Melissa Leventon contributes the essay "Distinctly Californian: Modernism in Textiles and Fashion" to this catalogue, which accompanied a major exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the first comprehensive examination of California's mid-century modern design. The book includes 350 images (most in color) of furniture, ceramics, metalwork, architecture, graphic and industrial design, film, textiles, and fashion, and 10 incisive essays that trace the rise of the California design aesthetic, from specific design influences and innovations in solid-color commercial ceramics to inspirations from Mexico and Asia, new schools for design training, new concepts about leisure, and the conversion of wartime technologies to peacetime use.

Read the rest

Posted on Monday, October 15, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

The Littlest Birds Sing the Prettiest Songs
Chronicle Books, 2012
Hardcover, 128 pages, $24.95

The San Francisco-based artist Jennie Smith celebrates the folk song tradition with her illustrated renderings of 13 soulful songs, including time-honored Scottish ballads, classics by the likes of the Carter Family, contemporary favorites by Gillian Welch, and more. Smith’s work was featured in the 2006 Whitney Biennial, and has been exhibited throughout the United States and internationally. The book includes a foreword from contemporary folk legend Michael Hurley, complete lyrics, and playable tablature or sheet music for each song.

The book is designed by CCA alumni Jennifer Tolo Pierce and Brooke Johnson (Graphic Design 2003).

Read the rest

Posted on Monday, October 15, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here
PM Press, 2012
Paperback, 300 pages, $20

On March 5th, 2007, a car bomb was exploded on al-Mutanabbi Street in Baghdad -- the historic center of Baghdad bookselling -- wounding more than 100 people and killing more than 30. This anthology, long in preparation, begins with a historical introduction to al-Mutanabbi Street and includes the writing of Iraqis as well as a wide swath of international poets and writers who were outraged by this attack. The publisher PM Press, is local, and the book is coedited by the San Francisco bookseller Beau Beausoleil with the poet Deema Shehabi. Steve Dickison (Writing and Literature faculty), is one of many contributors.

Exploring the question “Where does al-Mutanabbi Street start?,” the book looks at both communities and nations, seeking to show the commonality between a small street in Baghdad and other individual cultural centers. Chapters examine al-Mutanabbi Street as a place for the free exchange of ideas, a place that has long offered its sanctuary to the complete spectrum of Iraqi voices, and a place where the roots of democracy took hold many hundreds of years ago.

Read the rest

Pages