Career Development News

Posted on Friday, August 23, 2013 by Claire Fitzsimmons

Aimee Le Duc (center) with artists Jenifer Wofford and Stephanie Syjuco at the SFAC’s Passport 2012 event

The San Francisco-based curator, writer, and arts administrator Aimee Le Duc (MA Visual Criticism 2003, MFA Writing 2004) resists the concept of the curator-as-itinerant-worker, traipsing around the world, dropping in and out of various local situations.

Rather, you might call her a homegrown talent, with deep roots in a particular place. CCA, the San Francisco arts community, and the city itself have shaped her and her career. And now Le Duc sees her role as galleries manager at the San Francisco Arts Commission essentially as giving back.

"I feel very, very lucky. I've got a network that I use every day, and it includes many teachers and peers I first met at CCA. This network has sustained me, and I now see my role as sustaining it."

Posted on Thursday, August 15, 2013 by Jim Norrena

The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design announced in April that Hilary Sanders and Michael Esteban, two recent Jewelry / Metal Arts alumni, both were awarded a 2013 Windgate Fellowship, bringing to five the total number to date of Windgate Fellowships awarded to CCA students since the award's inception.

The fellowship selection process presents a “rare opportunity to survey the best and brightest emerging makers in the field of craft.” It also gives these emerging artists both the validation and financial resources to pursue their dreams.

View additional works by the artists »

Posted on Thursday, August 15, 2013 by Anesta Iwan

Anesta Iwan and her Lowell High School professor Julian Pollak

At first there was one, then a second, a third, a fourth, and eventually a fifth and a sixth and so on. . . . There is a chain of us "Lowellites" (graduates from Lowell High School in San Francisco) who very decisively moved on to CCA right after high school. I was the fourth.

Soon after I gave up my fantasy of becoming an astronaut back in fifth grade, I quickly took an interest in architecture. This was back in 2001, around the time when the Sims game was developed and got popular. I had watched my cousin play it online (I can only imagine how irritating it must have been with the old dial-up connection!) and remember getting so engrossed in designing the houses -- far more than in the social aspects of the game.

Posted on Monday, August 12, 2013 by Matthew Harrison Tedford

Marketing your own work can be the hardest part of being an artist. It can feel artificial, foreign, tedious, and even antithetical to the work itself. Yet for professional artists it's necessary, and, when done right, it can actually be rewarding and fruitful.

Social media is free and ubiquitous, and as a marketing tool it comes easy for some. But for every artist to whom it seems totally natural to tweet their latest pins using a series of well-placed hashtags, there are plenty more artists who are wondering what the heck you're talking about.

For those in the latter group: Take comfort and read on. Innumerable artists are successfully using social media in ways that are true to their personalities and their work . . . and even fun to keep up with.

Posted on Monday, July 8, 2013 by Jim Norrena

"Serpentine" is a 3D clay printer prototype [photo: Future Cities Lab]

Alex Woodhouse (MAAD 2013) and Shawn Komlos (MArch 2014) are part of the Serpentine development team at Future Cities Lab, run by CCA Architecture faculty member Jason Johnson.

Read the feature »

Serpentine was awarded an editor's choice blue ribbon at the 2013 Bay Area Maker Faire.

Posted on Thursday, July 4, 2013 by Jim Norrena

CCA's booth at Maker Faire received two Make magazine editor's choice awards

Ever since the college was founded in 1907, making art has defined what we do at California College of the Arts -- both what we create and how we create it.

Today we have a new challenge to how we create art. The Bay Area has become a vast melting pot of innovation driven by the demands of technology-reliant and design-savvy enthusiasts.

We live in the innovation corridor -- a unique stomping grounds where the doers and makers are integrating time-honored principles of craft into the ever-changing technological landscape.

Posted on Thursday, June 20, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Owen Smith, the new chair of CCA's Illustration Program, got his first New Yorker cover commission when he was a senior at Art Center College of Design. "I'd entered a work in a juried competition, and it was published in American Illustration, and Françoise Mouly, the art director of the New Yorker, saw it and called me. I was lucky. But I suppose it's also true that you make your own luck, as they say."

So, what is Smith's advice for students looking to break into the field?

"They should enter their work in juried competitions, like those run by the Society of Illustrators, American Illustration, and Communication Arts. They have categories for unpublished work and student work. It is a great way to get your art seen alongside the art of very successful, senior professionals."

Posted on Wednesday, June 5, 2013 by Allison Byers

For most design school graduates, it’s a dream come true to produce work that is seen by millions. For Zach Gibson (MFA Design 2011) and Jefferson Cheng (Graphic Design 2005), it’s an everyday reality working in the art department at Google.

Posted on Wednesday, May 29, 2013 by Allison Byers

When we asked the 2013 Tribeca filmmakers what schools they went to, we were not expecting such a diverse crop of responses. While a fair number did not attend film school, NYU was heartily represented. Boston University, Tel Avivi University and the program at University of Florida (now at Wake Forest) all were fairly well represented. Compare this list to the Sundance filmmakers from earlier this year.

Visit source »

Posted on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 by Rachel Walther

Alumna Mary Meyer (Painting 2001) was born and raised in California, but her affinity for the East Coast eventually drew her to New York, and she's never looked back.

Today she owns and operates Mary Meyer Clothing, a storefront shop in the Bushwick neighborhood of Brooklyn and a wholesale business. She produces and sells clothing of her own design, and also represents several other independent designers.

Her work is a mixture of organic and angular -- natural fabrics with sharp angles and bold shapes.

Meyer credits the success of her company to the enthusiasm for experimentation and innovation fostered during her years at CCA.

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