CCA in the Media News

Posted on Monday, February 8, 2016 by Laura Braun

Born in Bellingham, Washington, Ireland studied Printmaking and Industrial Arts at California College of Arts and Crafts, graduating in 1953 with his BFA. After college he joined the army. After leaving the Army Ireland traveled Europe extensively, working as an illustrator, and eventually traveled to Africa to lead safaris.

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Posted on Monday, February 8, 2016 by Laura Braun

Raised in Tehran, Iran, and living and working in San Francisco, Taraneh Hemami continues to explore themes of displacement, preservation and representation in her collective and curatorial projects, creating connections through experimental projects between artists, writers and scholars.

Posted on Monday, February 8, 2016 by Laura Braun

His father's store opened up a fertile avenue of artistic inspiration by providing Yeager contact with Native American traders from Western Washington and Vancouver Island. Although New Mexico sparked the artist's interpretive series of aboriginal people, Bellingham provided the seed. He eventually looked outside of Whatcom County for a cultural center with an established art school.

Posted on Friday, February 5, 2016 by Laura Braun

The first academic concentration in the field dates to just 2005, at California College of the Arts in San Francisco. Since then, at least 10 other institutions have established master’s-level degree programs in social practice art (sometimes called community engagement, contextual practice or socially engaged art-making). Many others have added classes, minors, concentrations and certificate programs.

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Posted on Friday, February 5, 2016 by Laura Braun

It sounds like a big responsibility, but Ganim’s budding cyborgs were guided and assisted by KidMob’s crew, which included a volunteer prostheticist and a group of passionate graduate students from California College of the Arts.

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Posted on Friday, February 5, 2016 by Laura Braun

With the help of many of America’s leading art and design schools, we once again identify top students ready to burst on the design scene. Some are undergrads, others are graduate students, all have found personal and professional growth through their programs. Our Students To Watch feature has become a tradition that resonates and renews: the students get recognized and the professional creative community gets refreshed.

Posted on Friday, February 5, 2016 by Laura Braun

California College of the Arts (CCA) educates students to shape culture and society through the practice and critical study of art, architecture, design, and writing. Founded in 1907, the college currently offers 22 undergraduate and 13 graduate programs to its nearly 2000 students. Graphic design students at CCA learn how to engage the mind and the senses by translating ideas into provocative forms and powerful experiences. They identify problems and find solutions that move people to think, feel, and act. 

Posted on Thursday, February 4, 2016 by Laura Braun

He later developed the glass program at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland -- now the California College of the Arts -- where he remained until 1987, when he left to work full time in his studio in Berkeley.

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Posted on Thursday, February 4, 2016 by Laura Braun

Tina Takemoto, an artist and associate professor of visual studies at California College of the Arts, discussed the display on Jiro Onuma, a gay Japanese immigrant who arrived in California in 1923. The exhibit, which was curated by Takemoto, contains photographs of Onuma with his friends and lovers around San Francisco and a small selection of homoerotic kitsch, including his postcard of a matador with a bronze erect penis, which could be detached and used as a necktie pin (then placed back on the matador at the end of the day), she said.

Posted on Thursday, February 4, 2016 by Laura Braun

In Women in Dark Times, Jacqueline Rose discusses the paintings of Charlotte Salomon, a German-Jewish artist who generated hundreds of autobiographical semi-abstract gouaches during two years in exile from the Nazis, before she was killed at Auschwitz. Rose is interested in Salomon as a figure for a shadowy, ambiguous feminism, one of material, bodily terror and unstable yet entrenched politics. Rose’s Salomon is a useful paradigm for understanding the work of Ellen Cantor.

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