CCA in the Media News

Posted on Tuesday, April 14, 2015 by Laura Braun

At the end of last month we, along with just about every other tech news site on the planet, were captivated by the somewhat disasterful (yes, I made that word up) performance of a 3D printer which printed using an aerosol-like can of Easy Cheese. The creation was the brainchild of California College of the Arts (CCA) Hybrid Lab manager Andrew Maxwell-Parish.

Posted on Tuesday, April 14, 2015 by Laura Braun

No stranger to communal connectivity, CE2 partners with the California College of the Arts through an externship program, and hosts six art shows throughout the year, attracting roughly 15,000 visitors. 

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Posted on Tuesday, April 14, 2015 by Laura Braun

Born in San Francisco in 1932, raised in Alameda, artist Robert Bechtle has lived most of his 82 years in the Bay Area.  He received his Bachelor and Master of Fine Arts from the California College of the Arts in Oakland, and taught painting at San Francisco State University for 30 years.  He currently resides in Potrero Hill.

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Posted on Tuesday, April 14, 2015 by Laura Braun

California College of the Arts (CCA) students will soon get a respite from San Francisco’s high-priced housing market. The Panoramic, located at 1321 Mission Street, is set to open in August, and will house around 200 artists-in-training. Half of the 160-unit complex will be set aside for CCA students, with the other half dedicated to Conservatory of Music undergraduates, according to Chris Bliss, CCA vice president of communications. 

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Posted on Monday, April 13, 2015 by Laura Braun

At San Francisco’s California College of the Arts (CCA) students use Othermill in their cutting-edge Hybrid Lab, a multidisciplinary creative technology lab that makes tools of engineering accessible to students in art and design. Students prototype circuit boards for computers, and wearables for mechatronics. Instructors said it has lowered the barrier to getting started with electronics.

Posted on Monday, April 13, 2015 by Laura Braun

Flipping through more than 100 advertisements that are stripped of all words and context and guessing what they mean is an exercise for the brain. Nevertheless, last week, for more than an hour, we sat in artist Hank Willis Thomas' midtown Manhattan studio doing just that. The images we viewed compose his most recent body of work, "Unbranded: A Century of White Women, 1915-2015," which will go on view today at Jack Shainmain Gallery in Chelsea, and delves even further into the artist's previous explorations of power, beauty, privlege, and desire in America.

Posted on Monday, April 13, 2015 by Laura Braun

Time is running out for the inflatable man. His precious seconds ticking upward in large blinking red numbers on an LED screen. Some passers-by stop to take-in the painfully slow demise - unaware that the writhing, thrashing figure with the frowny face is essentially pummeling himself into oblivion.

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Posted on Friday, April 10, 2015 by Laura Braun

"I'm delighted to welcome Liam to our board of trustees," said the chair of the board C Diane Christensen. "As a prominent Bay Area business leader, he embraces the values we hold dear at CCA: creativity and innovation, community engagement, entrepreneurialism, and social and environmental responsibility.

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Posted on Friday, April 10, 2015 by Laura Braun

When we digest a printed advertisement, whether it's for a skin cream or an underwear brand or a fast food joint, the actual commercial good being plugged is often irrelevant. Behind the logo, messages such as this is how you want to look and this is how you want to be seen bubble beneath the surface, instructing us all how to look, act and speak in order to be accepted, valued, loved.

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Posted on Friday, April 10, 2015 by Laura Braun

For their first solo show in the U.S., the Belgian duo Jos de Gruyter & Harald Thys filled San Francisco’s Wattis Institute with varying tones of blankness. Upon entering the main gallery, one is oddly “greeted” by a plethora of tall, stark white, paper-doll-like figurative steel sculptures titled The White Elements (2012). Each is topped with a scribbly, pencil-drawn portrait of an indiscriminate face.

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