CCA in the Media News

Posted on Monday, December 1, 2014 by Laura Braun

This is an impossible body.Some parts are painted, some are bagged, some stand straight, and others are perched up high.A network of metal rods holds them together, forming a central nervous system that allows each painting, sculpture, or piece of architecture to function as a dispersed limb of a single organism. As such, they belong with and fold into each other. Objects migrate into paintings, and bodies find a way to slip into objects.

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Posted on Monday, December 1, 2014 by Laura Braun

Established in 1998 at the California College of the Arts, CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Art is a venue for exhibitions as well as a place for research. Exhibitions focus on one artist at a time, with the current exhibition showcasing the work of Austrian artist Markus Schinwald. A joint venture with SFMOMA, this site-specific installation features sculptures made from Chippendale-style table legs that wrap around poles as well as modified 19th-century paintings.

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Posted on Tuesday, November 25, 2014 by Laura Braun

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) in partnership with the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts will present Markus Schinwald, on view at the Wattis Institute from September 9 through December 13, 2014. This exhibition by Austrian artist Markus Schinwald (b. 1973) marks his first major commission for a U.S. institution. The site-responsive installation will include an architectural intervention that changes the physical and psychological potential of the gallery, providing a display apparatus for Schinwald’s paintings and sculptures.

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Posted on Monday, November 24, 2014 by Laura Braun

Before California College of the Arts in San Francisco hired Anthony Huberman to direct its Wattis Institute, he was invited to co-curate the 2014 Liverpool Biennial exhibition.

I met him there, in the Beatles’ hometown, just before the biennial’s July press preview, thinking -- correctly, as it turned out -- that the Liverpool show might give an inkling of his plans for the Wattis.

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Posted on Friday, November 21, 2014 by Laura Braun

The plate was designed by Marco Guadarrama, a design strategist who's currently on a Fulbright Scholarship at California College Of The Arts, who likens his design to an "artist's palette."

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Posted on Friday, November 21, 2014 by Laura Braun

You may know the 41-year-old Oakland resident from his much-lauded 2012 Smithsonian installation, En-Lightening—a room composed of handcrafted tiles, LED lights, and a single chair. The piece attempts to replicate the effects of meditation, such as tranquility and stillness, and emerged from the pressure his family put upon him to embrace their religion. Dong cites the experience of creating En-Lightening as essential to his personal growth.

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Posted on Wednesday, November 19, 2014 by Laura Braun

Architect Katherine Lambert—of the California firms Lambert MacDonald and Metropolitan Architectural Practice—and her business partner and creative collaborator, filmmaker and academic Christiane Robbins, had been looking for a plot of land on which to build when they learned about the property. Despite their immediate interest in the building, they were also “a bit frightened,” Lambert says, given the fact that old-growth redwood had long since ceased to be commercially available. “The house was derelict and felt really sad,” Lambert says. “Some friends said, ‘Are you crazy?

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Posted on Wednesday, November 19, 2014 by Laura Braun

Despite this, and its steep asking price of $789,000, the house attracted the interest of Christiane Robbins and Katherine Lambert, partners in the San Francisco architectural firm MAP, Metropolitan Architectural Practice. The friends and business partners were struck by the beauty of the home’s structure. They also noticed that the same group of about six people attended all three of the home’s open houses. “It was strange,” says Ms. Robbins.

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Posted on Wednesday, November 19, 2014 by Laura Braun

Even without the prosthetic, Robinson does many of the things kids his age like to do—play on the computer, compete on the swim team, study karate (he’s a green belt), and even throw perfectly round bowls on the pottery wheel. But in the coming weeks, Robinson’s prosthetic-free streak may come to an end. Last July, Robinson attended Superhero Cyborg Camp, a one-week design education workshop for kids with varying degrees of upper-limb loss.

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Posted on Wednesday, November 19, 2014 by Laura Braun

In San Francisco, “speculative” architects are turning their attention to how buildings might be redesigned to accommodate local water sources and a changing climate.

In a bright and airy studio in San Francisco’s Dogpatch neighborhood, Nataly Gattegno, a co-founder of the Future Cities Lab, introduces me to Hydramax.

Hydramax is a model of a theoretical structure (the word “building” doesn’t quite feel adequate; Gattegno calls it a “port machine”) designed for the San Francisco waterfront.

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