CCA in the Media News

Posted on Monday, July 6, 2015 by Laura Braun

The impact the school has had on contemporary craft is immeasurable: Ceramist Viola Frey taught there, as did glass artist Marvin Lipofsky, who founded the glass program in 1967. Ceramist Peter Voulkos and fiber artist Kay Sekimachi are among its prominent alumni, as is furniture maker (and Oakland icon) Garry Knox Bennett, whose workshop is near Jack London Square.

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Posted on Monday, July 6, 2015 by Laura Braun

The first, not insignificant challenge to viewing K.r.m. Mooney’s elusive but rewarding exhibition at the Wattis Institute is to recalibrate your perspective. There is little on the wall in this minimal collection of works made from deceptively prosaic materials. You have to look down, up and around to notice the small monochromatic sculptures that seem perfectly at home on the cool concrete floor. The sculptures are small tangles of industrial materials, works made from wire, cable, electrical conduit and various pieces of hardware arranged in seemingly loose configurations.

Posted on Wednesday, July 1, 2015 by Laura Braun

I was thinking about the delicate balance of secrets and messages again earlier this month when I spent some time at the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Art in San Francisco, where Julia Heyward is getting her first monographic survey, “Consciousness Knocks Unconscious,” a finely honed selection of video and performance documentation from 1971 to 1984, curated by Jamie Stevens. (You can feel the weight of the boxes he had to sift through to choose what he chose.)

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Posted on Wednesday, July 1, 2015 by Laura Braun

My first job was actually at Incase. I started working here during my senior year in college. They brought me on as a freelancer to design a brochure, and I guess the rest is history. I signed on full-time the second I graduated.

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Posted on Tuesday, June 30, 2015 by Laura Braun

New York artist Julia Heyward utilises language as a central tie in a career that spans video, performance, music, installation, photography and collage. Named after her 1979 video, her solo exhibition Conscious Knocks Unconscious at the Wattis Institute in San Francisco explores her multidisciplinary output between 1971–84. Heyward, who at the time went under the moniker Duka Delight, was involved in New York City’s thriving downtown scene.

Posted on Monday, June 29, 2015 by Laura Braun

At California College of the Arts’ annual senior fashion show, 13 now-graduates showcased original collections to ogling industry pros and style obsessives, and each quick three-minute presentation proved that they are some of the most creative emerging minds in the industry. Inspiring? Totally, but it didn’t end when the models exited the catwalk. We tapped the soon-to-be style stars to share what inspires their work, imaginations and personal style, and their answers are sure to help you bust through your next creative roadblock.

Posted on Monday, June 29, 2015 by Laura Braun

Since 1970, when she enrolled in the California College of Arts and Crafts, Carnwath has lived in Oakland. She confesses to still missing the cold and occasionally cranking up the air conditioning so she can walk around in her winter coat. But she has found mentors, friends and a community that has supported her work.

Posted on Friday, June 26, 2015 by Laura Braun

Jessica Silverman opened her first art gallery while still a curatorial student at the California College of the Arts. Now she's one the brightest stars on the San Francisco art scene.

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Posted on Thursday, June 25, 2015 by Laura Braun

So we reached out to professors at seven of the world’s top design schools to ask what books they recommend for getting your feet wet in design. Each school submitted five books that span design disciplines, from industrial design to graphic design to interior design and more. We combined them into this reading list, links to Amazon and all. Let your summer beach reading start here.

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Posted on Thursday, June 25, 2015 by Laura Braun

Though he enjoyed the assisting work, Thomas decided that he was getting too comfortable. “I didn’t have the ambition to be a great photographer or artist or filmmaker.” So he decided to go back to school, and applied to the California College of the Arts. There, he would study with Larry Sultan, Jim Goldberg, Todd Hido and Chris Johnson. “They shaped a lot of my thinking about how I could move into making work that was more conceptual, rather than trying to get [assignment] gigs and things like that,” Thomas says.

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