CCA in the Media News

Posted on Tuesday, September 30, 2014 by Laura Braun

When it comes to decor, one tiny change can make a big difference. One place to start is from the ground up, with an area rug. At 4 feet and 6 feet in diameter, these bright, nature-derivative whimsical designs by artistMonreaux Ruth Monroe deliver high impact in small spaces. The recent California College of the Arts graduate says rugs are a quick, easy and affordable way to inject some personality into living spaces without dramatically altering the spatial confines.

Posted on Wednesday, September 24, 2014 by Laura Braun

The first of several exhibitions of his work was mounted in 1965 at California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland. In 1967, Steloff sold the Gotham Book Mart to Andreas Brown, who entered into an unusual relationship with Gorey: in 1970, Gorey’s The Sopping Thursday became the first of his books to be published by the bookstore, which also mounted an exhibition of his works that year and began serving as an archive for his art.

Posted on Tuesday, September 23, 2014 by Laura Braun

"They’re in the kind of collective psychology of San Franciscans," Craig Scott, a founding partner of IwamotoScott, says of the three sites. "You see those structures from a long distance on the freeways or on the hilltops," he explains. "They have this kind of status--at least visually--as landmarks along the eastern side of the city."

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Posted on Tuesday, September 23, 2014 by Laura Braun

Joan Jonas is finally getting her due. As we plunge headlong into the digital age, the visionary work in video and performance by this downtown New York stalwart seems to become only more relevant. She will represent the U.S. in next year's Venice Biennale, but in the meantime you can acquaint yourself with her earlier work in a major survey exhibition at Hangar Bicocca in Milan [opening Oct. 2], plus a series of public events reconsidering her career at the California College of the Arts' Wattis Institute in San Francisco [through May 2015].

Posted on Tuesday, September 23, 2014 by Laura Braun

The Geoweaver’s glue gun–like 3D printer extrudes fiber-reinforced concrete as it navigates terrain on six legs. A building plan transmitted through radio signals guides the machine’s activity via open-source software, cross-weaving lines of concrete to knit the fibers together. Its developers see the ’bot as a foreman of the future, with integrated sensors and GPS to perform site analysis and record soil data and topography.

Posted on Tuesday, September 23, 2014 by Laura Braun

333 is a summer comprehensive design studio hosted by California college during July 28th and august 15th. the studio concentrates on exploring and innovating cutting methods, materials and technology. Mauricio Soto, Sean Ahlquist, and Julian Lienhard – leaders in the field of lightweight structures- co-operated with students in laboratory-like environment trying to gain advantages from San Francisco Bay Area’s features –geographically , socially and culturally- as resources for experiments in architecture and design.

Posted on Tuesday, September 23, 2014 by Laura Braun

Mason St. Peter is a fresh architecture graduate from San Francisco’s California College of the Arts. He loves nature and surfing and it was while visiting a close friend at a cabin that he fell in love with the Topanga Canyon area. He decided to look for another cabin to rent, but there weren’t any available at the time.

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Posted on Tuesday, September 23, 2014 by Laura Braun

This rustic cabin, located in Topanga Canyon in California, was designed by Mason St. Peter—a graduate of the California College of the Arts in San Francisco. While visiting a friend in a similar studio, St. Peter was inspired and began to work with the owner to create a space of their own using his materials. 

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Posted on Tuesday, September 23, 2014 by Laura Braun

When I wrote my recent feature Test I ignored the usual advice about screenwriting structure. It was a leap of faith and an experiment in not knowing. Compared to earlier writing experiences (a co-written first feature, The New Twenty, and two other scripts that didn’t get made), the process may have been difficult, but it felt right. In addition to letting myself not know the story until after it was written, I also ignored standard industry orthodoxy about keeping description to a minimum. I wanted a movie with long sequences that had no dialogue, that depended on image and sound.

Posted on Tuesday, September 16, 2014 by Laura Braun

Austrian artist Markus Schinwald likes to start with an already created work and add on. For example, in his first major U.S. show at the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, he has retooled Chippendale-style table legs, making them into sculptures that crawl up the walls or wrap around bronze poles. He also buys 19th century paintings and adds things to them – jewelry, braces, head coverings or chains. 

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