CCA in the Media News

Posted on Monday, July 13, 2015 by Laura Braun

Alan Christopher Chin is a contemporary American artist. He lives and maintains a studio in Downey, working in variety of traditional and experimental mediums including, painting, photography, sculpture, film, and performance. He received his BFA in Ceramics and Painting (2010) at the California College of the Arts in Oakland, California.

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Posted on Thursday, July 9, 2015 by Laura Braun

Wayne White was born and raised in Chattanooga, Tennessee. An artist, art director, illustrator, and puppeteer, he moved to New York City in 1981 to pursue his art career and find the platform that would support his ambitions. After working in comics and puppeteering, Wayne White became a designer for the hit television show Pee-wee's Playhouse. He received three Emmys for his work on the show, moved to Los Angeles and continues to have success in the arts and entertainment industry. He has two children, both of whom are artists, and lives with his artist wife, Mimi Pond.

Posted on Thursday, July 9, 2015 by Laura Braun

"Rachel and I wanted a French press we'd be happy to leave out on the table, one that would be a centerpiece of the kitchen rather than something that goes right back into the cabinet after each use," says Andrew Deming of Yield Design Co. He and his partner, Rachel Gant, met as design students at California College of the Arts in SF and founded Yield with a mission to "pair American craft and ingenuity with an eye toward the future." That includes a beautiful brew: The duo, now based in St.

Posted on Thursday, July 9, 2015 by Laura Braun

The 100 Hooper site, adjacent to Showplace Square, is a good place to mix the uses, Sanford said, because it’s close to tech giants like Dolby, Pinterest and Cisco, but also close to the startups coming out of nearby California College of the Arts and UCSF.

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Posted on Monday, July 6, 2015 by Laura Braun

With a long résumé of well-received shows at museums including MOCA, The Contemporary in Baltimore, and LACMA, Alexandra Grant is just hitting her stride. However, that doesn’t mean the 42-year-old is resting on her laurels—her latest body of work is not what most would expect. Her new series of paintings, “Antigone 3000,” has been hidden in the artist’s studio for the past year, and it has a sense of freedom and play not found in her earlier, often text-based pieces.

Posted on Monday, July 6, 2015 by Laura Braun

The impact the school has had on contemporary craft is immeasurable: Ceramist Viola Frey taught there, as did glass artist Marvin Lipofsky, who founded the glass program in 1967. Ceramist Peter Voulkos and fiber artist Kay Sekimachi are among its prominent alumni, as is furniture maker (and Oakland icon) Garry Knox Bennett, whose workshop is near Jack London Square.

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Posted on Monday, July 6, 2015 by Laura Braun

The first, not insignificant challenge to viewing K.r.m. Mooney’s elusive but rewarding exhibition at the Wattis Institute is to recalibrate your perspective. There is little on the wall in this minimal collection of works made from deceptively prosaic materials. You have to look down, up and around to notice the small monochromatic sculptures that seem perfectly at home on the cool concrete floor. The sculptures are small tangles of industrial materials, works made from wire, cable, electrical conduit and various pieces of hardware arranged in seemingly loose configurations.

Posted on Wednesday, July 1, 2015 by Laura Braun

I was thinking about the delicate balance of secrets and messages again earlier this month when I spent some time at the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Art in San Francisco, where Julia Heyward is getting her first monographic survey, “Consciousness Knocks Unconscious,” a finely honed selection of video and performance documentation from 1971 to 1984, curated by Jamie Stevens. (You can feel the weight of the boxes he had to sift through to choose what he chose.)

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Posted on Wednesday, July 1, 2015 by Laura Braun

My first job was actually at Incase. I started working here during my senior year in college. They brought me on as a freelancer to design a brochure, and I guess the rest is history. I signed on full-time the second I graduated.

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Posted on Tuesday, June 30, 2015 by Laura Braun

New York artist Julia Heyward utilises language as a central tie in a career that spans video, performance, music, installation, photography and collage. Named after her 1979 video, her solo exhibition Conscious Knocks Unconscious at the Wattis Institute in San Francisco explores her multidisciplinary output between 1971–84. Heyward, who at the time went under the moniker Duka Delight, was involved in New York City’s thriving downtown scene.

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