Curatorial Practice News

Posted on Sunday, January 6, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Americana: 50 States, 50 Months, 50 Exhibitions
CCA Wattis Institute, 2012
Hardcover, 240 pages, $25

This catalogue, designed by Jon Sueda (Graphic Design faculty), documents a five-year-long series of exhibitions that examined the 50 American states, featuring artworks, historical artifacts, curiosities, and aspects of the overlooked and the little-known. The series was coorganized by Wattis Institute director Jens Hoffmann and CCA's Graduate Program in Curatorial Practice.

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Posted on Monday, December 10, 2012 by Susannah Magers

Pae White, muhf-uhl, 2012

Susannah Magers (MA Curatorial Practice 2011) spent five months in 2012 on site as the visitor engagement manager at the exhibition International Orange, a FOR-SITE Foundation project located in Fort Point, near San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge.

It is the latest and most ambitious project yet produced by the foundation, a San Francisco-based nonprofit dedicated to the production of art about place.

What It's Like to be at International Orange

When I tell people I work in a fort underneath the Golden Gate Bridge, their reaction usually registers surprise, followed by confusion ("Wait . . . where?"). The date is October 25, 2012, and I have spent the past five months, five days a week, on site as the visitor engagement manager at the exhibition International Orange.

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Posted on Thursday, September 20, 2012 by Allison Byers

Last week, Disjecta announced the first exhibition presented by the space's 2012-2013 curator in residence, Josephine Zarkovich. For this first show of the season, Zarkovich brought in Oakland-based artist Suzy Poling, who, according to the press release, "has created a series of large-scale experimental photographs and video installations that address issues of ecology, materiality, and regeneration" in an exhibition titled Elemental Forces.

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Posted on Tuesday, August 28, 2012 by Joyce Grimm

On Wednesday, September 19, 2012, CCA Film and Fine Arts faculty member Lynn Marie Kirby, together with collaborator Alexis Petty, will present The 24th Street Listening Project at the Brava Theater in San Francisco. The evening will include the screening of a new video by Kirby exploring the neighborhood through color and language mapping, a musical performance reflecting local stories and topography, a book release, and the launch of the new website, 24thStreetListeningProject.com.

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Posted on Thursday, May 10, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

Will Brown is an actual guy. A very cool and nice guy, according to all who know him, plus a CCA Curatorial Practice graduate student. Once upon a time, not too long ago, Will was spending a lot of time by himself down at 3041 24th Street, which some of you may recognize as the address of the late, great Triple Base gallery. Triple Base was founded in 2006 by CCA Curatorial Practice grads Joyce Grimm and Dina Pugh (both class of 2006) and finally closed in 2011. Toward the end there, the space's main "resident" who was keeping it up and running and officially occupied was their friend Will.

If you've been down to that block of 24th Street in the last few years, around Harrison and Folsom, you know that it has become a lovely haven of art and food while retaining its Mission District feel. So three friends of Dina and Joyce (two of them also alumni of CCA grad programs) decided to step up and take over the lease. The idea of running their own experimental/conceptual gallery space, once conceived, seemed like an offer they couldn't refuse.

The question that almost derailed everything was what to name this new venture, but under their self-imposed 11th-hour wire came the stroke of genius. "Will Brown" is of course a spoof on commercial gallery naming conventions. It is also a benign inside joke, and a well-meant tribute to a friend. Keeping it in the family, so to speak. The three of them also liked the idea of operating as a singular, semi-authorless entity.

The three new proprietors of Will Brown (the gallery) are David Kasprzak (MA Curatorial Practice 2011), Lindsey White (MFA 2007), and Jordan Stein (a 2005 MFA grad of the San Francisco Art Institute). Far easier than picking a name was selecting the theme of their first show, which opened on January 27 and closed March 4. The provocative premise, like the gallery's name, was a refutation of art business as usual, and specifically a play on art ownership and art-world transactions. Illegitimate Business featured artworks and ephemera "with a peculiar provenance," in other words acquired by their (anonymous) lenders under less-than-totally-up-and-up circumstances. The original concept came from old conversations with the curators' artist friends Zachary Royer Scholz (MFA 2006, MA Visual and Critical Studies 2009) and Brion Nuda Rosch.

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Posted on Thursday, February 16, 2012 by Jim Norrena

CCA at CAA

Please join California College of the Arts at the College Art Association’s 100th annual conference in Los Angeles February 22–25. CCA faculty and alumni will be participating in various panel discussions throughout the conference. (See event schedule below.)

We invite you to drop by the CCA booth at the conference’s Book and Trade Fair to meet esteemed members of our faculty. We're looking forward to meeting you!

Special Reception for Alumni

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Posted on Monday, February 6, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

Fifty Years of Bay Area Art: The SECA Awards
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, 2011
Hardcover, 168 pages, $29.95

Tanya Zimbardo (MA Curatorial Practice 2005), SFMOMA's assistant curator of media arts, coauthored this book chronicling and illustrating more than 100 SECA Award recipients from the late 1960s to the present, including CCA alumni Squeak Carnwath, Desirée Holman, Mitzi Pederson, Laurie Reid, Leslie Shows, and Kathryn VanDyke, among others. Featured faculty include Rebeca Bollinger, Kota Ezawa, Thom Faulders, Chris Finley, Donald Fortescue, Amy Franceschini, Clay Jensen, Jordan Kantor, Shaun O'Dell, Maria Porges, and Mary Snowden.

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Posted on Monday, February 6, 2012 by Allison Byers

Steven Leiber, a San Francisco art dealer and collector who became an expert in artists’ ephemera and built an archive that became an important resource for scholars and curators, died on Jan. 28 at his home there. He was 54.

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Posted on Monday, February 6, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

Wendover
CCA Graduate Program in Curatorial Practice, 2010
Paperback, 152 pages, free

Wendover documents a series of three Graduate Program in Curatorial Practice courses led by Center for Land Use Interpretation (CLUI) Director Matthew Coolidge and Curatorial Practice faculty member Marina McDougall. Analyzing exhibition and residency models, and looking more broadly at factors such as audience and site-specific programming, the enrolled students engaged with the CLUI outpost and artist residency in Wendover over a three-year period. A reader of sorts, the publication distills the students' activities and interactions with Wendover and documents their resulting projects: an audio tour (2008); a film program (2009); and an archive expansion (2010). Also included are interviews with Coolidge, Center for Art and Environment Director William Fox, and numerous texts contributed by students and visiting faculty. Contact sstone@cca.edu for a copy.

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Posted on Monday, February 6, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

Best Kept Secret: UCI and the Development of Contemporary Art in Southern California, 1964-1971
Laguna Art Museum, 2011
Paperback, 180 pages, $34.95

Grace Kook-Anderson (MA Curatorial Practice 2007), the Laguna Art Museum's curator of exhibitions, is a contributing writer to this recto-verso book published in conjunction with the Pacific Standard Time exhibition Best Kept Secret: UCI and the Development of Contemporary Art in Southern California, 1964-1971. This scholarly publication with primary research on UC Irvine and the development of its art department is the first to address the early years of the department. UCI was a hotbed of creativity and experimentation in the 1960s and early 1970s, with exceptional teachers such as Tony DeLap, Robert Irwin, and Vija Celmins teaching talented students such as Alexis Smith, Chris Burden, and Nancy Buchanan. The book includes an extensive timeline.

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