Diversity News

Posted on Monday, May 4, 2015 by Laura Kenney

Ming & Khen Soh pose with Ming's 32-pound king salmon

The following exchange between Wai Khen Soh and Wai Ming Soh -- twin brothers and each an Illustration major -- appears in the spring 2015 edition of Glance, the college magazine, as part of the How We Got Here series.

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Ming: I started thinking about my next course of action in life while I was serving my mandatory service in the Singapore Armed Forces. I had taken a diploma in digital media design in a polytechnic (which is like American community college) prior to my enlistment.

I asked myself: Shall I embark on work, or further my studies? Whatever path I pursued, I wanted to do the same thing as my twin brother, Khen, as it would be cool to see a pair of twins in the same profession.

Khen: It’s nice seeing brothers face tribulations side by side, especially when they have the same faces! Like most twins, we are always tearing at each other’s throats, only to give the other a friendly pat on the back when the going gets tough.

Also like most twins, we have similar interests. Drawing and creating stories are passions going way back to our childhood. It helped that our parents were encouraging.

I went to a polytechnic, too, and took a diploma in graphic design, and while the education was invaluable, I felt more interested in drawing and painting narratives. So we decided to take an undergraduate program in illustration together.

Posted on Friday, May 1, 2015 by Laura Kenney

CCA's Center for Art and Public Life has awarded IMPACT Social Entrepreneurship Awards to three student-led projects aimed at solving real-world social needs within specific communities.

During the spring semester, six interdisciplinary student teams competed for three $10,000 grants to develop and actualize a socially innovative project. The IMPACT program encourages students across all disciplines to facilitate social change by applying their creative skills and implement solutions collaboratively with community partners.

The awards program supports the mission of The Center for Art and Public Life with the belief that community engagement is the cornerstone of a practice focused on changing the world.

Posted on Tuesday, April 21, 2015 by Laura Braun

Tenazas attempted to enroll but much to her disdain, was rejected time and again. “They probably thought my work wasn’t too western and not sophisticated enough,” she recalls. She didn’t  give up and instead, headed westward and eventually took courses at California College of Arts (CCA) in San Francisco.

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Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2015 by Jim Norrena

On Monday, March 9, members of CCA Architecture staff, faculty, and students came together on the San Francisco campus to discuss why the Black Lives Matter movement is important to its pedagogy -- and beyond -- as well as to the college’s over-arching initiative to promote diversity.

The Black Lives Matter Teach-In began with a standing-room-only presentation in Timken Lecture Hall on the San Francisco campus, and was followed by an organized teach-in held in the back of the Nave.

Among the various breakout groups were meaningful discussions that addressed specific curricular issues and challenges about how architecture as a discipline can address issues related to diversity.

Posted on Tuesday, March 10, 2015 by Katherine Robards

Playwright Calamity West (MFA Writing 2007) is one of 10 Chicago-based female artists, artists of color, and artists with disabilities who work in the performing, teaching, and visual arts who received a prestigious 3Arts Award, which carries with it a no-strings-attached $25,000 cash award!

Since West left CCA, she has been continually working with theater companies -- playwriting and producing plays. Her work has appeared locally (San Francisco), nationally (Chicago), and internationally (Melbourne).

Watch an excerpt »

Most recent full-length productions of West's work: Ibsen is Dead, The Peacock (Jackalope Theatre Company); The Gacy Play (Sideshow Theatre Company); and Common Hatred (The Ruckus).

Posted on Tuesday, February 10, 2015 by Jeremy Joan Hewes

Anh (left) and Hoang Nguyen in San Francisco (photo: Luis Ruano)

When Industrial Design alumni Hoang Nguyen and his brother Anh came to CCA in 2004 and 2006, respectively, they started a club with the objective of getting a group of students to work together, helping each other learn and improve their skills.

They named the club for its purpose: Creative Session.

Although the club was slow to develop, that early effort evolved into their joint venture, a lively online presence that showcases an array of design projects, videos, and musings from the two brothers.

Creative Session (CS) has been going for seven-plus years and has brought Anh and Hoang lots of attention, including invitations to teach, to participate in design competitions, and most recently to be jury captains for consumer products at the 2015 Core77 Design Awards.

They also receive frequent job inquiries, Hoang says, “but we make it clear that CS is and has always been a platform for Anh and me to think, create, and share as brothers and, more importantly, as designers without constraints.”

Posted on Friday, February 6, 2015 by Jim Norrena

CCA's Oakland campus

Editor's note: CCA Graphic Design associate professor David Asari met with Art.College.Life blogger Elaine Pelz, who highlighted the benefits of a CCA education at artcollegelife.com.
 

Posted on Tuesday, February 3, 2015 by Jim Norrena

ACSA recently announced the 2014-15 Architectural Education Award Winners, and CCA Architecture faculty member Neal Schwartz is the recipient of the 2014-15 ACSA Diversity Achievement Award.

Each year ACSA honors architectural educators for exemplary work in areas such as building design, community collaborations, scholarship, and service.

Schwartz won for his work with the Q-Arc initiative at CCA, part of a broader effort to expand diversity collegewide through the discussion of LGBTQ issues.

Posted on Friday, December 5, 2014 by Jim Norrena

The Center for Art & Public Life (The Center) and the MBA in Design Strategy program, both at California College of the Arts, last month co-organized TechRaking 7, an annual hackathon series put on by The Center for Investigative Reporting (CIR), which focused on the intersection of journalism and design.

TechRaking 7, the first within the series to work exclusively with college students (and CCA as its official partner), had CIR CEO Joaquín Alvarado reaching out to CCA to pose the question: How can we rethink human interaction around the news within our communities?

CIR enlisted colleagues from two of its local media partners -- Bruce Koon of KQED and Martin Reynolds of the Bay Area News Group (BANG) -- to challenge CCA students with some of their toughest community-engagement issues. For example, how might:

CIR create new ways for people to communicate about the role of guns in their neighborhoods?
BANG offer a more participatory model that empowers residents to share overlooked topics?
KQED develop cross-regional tools to communicate better the personal effects of the growing technology industry?

Far be it for anyone at CCA to turn away a challenge, thought leaders at The Center decided to enlist the help of CCA students -- working in small teams representing a wide range of disciplines -- to collectively come up with innovative solutions that could encourage greater public participation in today's changing news gathering and distribution policies and procedures.

In short, TechRaking 7 challenged students to give the concept of the traditional newsstand a much-needed facelift.

Posted on Monday, October 13, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

When current CCA Director of Fine Arts Tammy Rae Carland was in college, Nirvana played the rent parties she and her friends threw at their student-founded alternative gallery space. “This was before they released records and got super-famous,” she avers. “But still!”

They called the gallery Reko-Muse. The place: Olympia, Washington. “It really was a ‘build it and they will come’ kind of a scene. Everyone I knew was playing in a band, starting a gallery, putting out zines, precisely because there was nothing to do otherwise, culturally speaking. And people would drive from Seattle -- or further, even -- to come to shows. Olympia’s music scene became a really big deal.”

Carland, who was also in bands, ran a record label, and put out more than a few zines herself, is today a rock star in another realm: photography.

 

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