Diversity News

Posted on Thursday, August 1, 2013 by Rachel Walther

When you first enter Enlightenment Room (2008), an immersive environment artwork by Jewelry / Metal Arts faculty member Nick Dong, nothing happens. You walk down a short, mirrored corridor in semi-darkness to a gray cushioned seat that faces the entrance.

But the moment you sit down, light begins to fill the space, and thousands of white, oval tiles glisten into view. Ethereal music fills your ears. The light brightens, and the music intensifies. This experience can last a few minutes, or a few hours, depending on how long you remain seated . . . waiting. The moment you stand, the music and lights fade out.

Watch a video of Enlightenment Room

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Posted on Thursday, August 1, 2013 by Allison Byers

Contribution by Ishmael Reed, Visiting Scholar at California College of the Arts:

George Zimmerman gives neighborhood watch volunteers a bad name. We don’t go tracking down unarmed teenagers who are trying to get home to watch a basketball game. We keep tabs on suspicious activities and advise our neighbors about the small things that can prevent them from having their homes burglarized and their cell phones from being stolen on the streets.

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Posted on Friday, July 26, 2013 by Jim Norrena

MFA Program in Writing visiting scholar Ishmael Reed was recently featured on Speakeasy, the Wall Street Journal arts and entertainment blog.

Reed, author of The Free-Lance Pallbearers and Reckless Eyeballing, uses the recent media storm surrounding the controversial "not guilty" verdict of George Zimmerman (on trial for the shooting death of Trayvon Martin in Florida) to accentuate his own experience participating as part of a neighborhood watch team in the Bay Area.

In February, Reed's article "Neo-Classical Republicanism" was published in the New York Times Opinion Pages.

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Posted on Thursday, July 18, 2013 by Allison Byers

"My Country Has No Name"

The work of 28-year-old Nigerian-born artist Toyin Odutola (MFA 2012) may literally be black portraiture with ballpoint pen ink, but speaking figuratively, her work speaks volumes. Addressing issues of identity, race, and nationhood, her art resonates strongly with her audiences.

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Posted on Wednesday, July 10, 2013 by Jim Norrena

Twerk
Belladonna, 2013
Paperback, 112 pages, $15

LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs (Writing 2008) has her first book of poetry now available: Twerk (Belladonna Press, 2013), which is already on the bestseller list for March and May with its distributor, Small Press Traffic.

MFA Program in Writing faculty member Gloria Frym calls Belladonna "a prestigious press for women writers."

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Posted on Friday, June 21, 2013 by Jim Norrena

A new guest lecture series presented by MFA in Comics!

In celebration of the arrival of the inaugural MFA in Comics class, California College of the Arts will host "Comics in the City," a summer guest speaker series featuring four of the most talented creators in comics today.

Each Friday in July, the speaker series will highlight various aspects of the comics medium -- from independent publishing to the craft of writing the most iconic superheroes.

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Posted on Friday, June 14, 2013 by Jim Norrena

In December 2012, luminary filmmaker Werner Herzog (third from right) taught a Film master class at CCA.

Last fall, on December 4, 2012, the Film Program, in association with CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, brought renowned German film director, producer, screenwriter, actor, and opera director Werner Herzog to California College of the Arts as a featured guest in its Cinema Visionaries lecture series.

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Posted on Wednesday, June 5, 2013 by Allison Byers

For most design school graduates, it’s a dream come true to produce work that is seen by millions. For Zach Gibson (MFA Design 2011) and Jefferson Cheng (Graphic Design 2005), it’s an everyday reality working in the art department at Google.

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Posted on Tuesday, June 4, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Power to the People: The Graphic Design of the Radical Press and the Rise of the Counter-Culture, 1964-1974
University of Chicago Press, 2013
Hardcover, 264 pages, $45

Though we think of the 1960s and the early '70s as a time of radical social, cultural, and political upheaval, we tend to picture the action as happening on campuses and in the streets. Yet the rise of the underground newspaper was equally daring and original. Thanks to advances in cheap offset printing, groups involved in antiwar, civil rights, and other social liberation issues began to spread their messages through provocatively designed newspapers and broadsheets. This vibrant new media was essential to the counterculture revolution as a whole, helping to motivate the masses and proliferate ideas.

This book is assembled by the renowned graphic designer and CCA Design faculty member Geoff Kaplan of General Working Group. It presents more than 700 full-color images and excerpts from these publications, many of which have not been seen since they were first published almost 50 years ago.

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Posted on Friday, May 31, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Liz Ogbu is CCA's "scholar in residence" at the Center for Art and Public Life. She spends about four or five hours a week there; she'd love it to be more, but she's a busy woman.

As often as twice a month she's getting on a plane to attend a design or education conference somewhere around the world -- frequently as an invited speaker. She teaches one course per semester at CCA, which translates to about one day a week. She spends another day every week teaching at Stanford University's famed Institute of Design, better known as "the d.school."

She also runs an independent consultancy that undertakes short- and long-term projects; currently she's working with CCA Architecture faculty member Douglas Burnham on something for PG&E, something else for the Nike Foundation in Nigeria, and a pop-up health clinic project funded by Autodesk.

With another CCA Architecture faculty member, Lisa Findley, she’s writing a chapter on South Africa for a book on different ways of appropriating space globally.

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