Diversity News

Posted on Monday, October 13, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

When current CCA Director of Fine Arts Tammy Rae Carland was in college, Nirvana played the rent parties she and her friends threw at their student-founded alternative gallery space. “This was before they released records and got super-famous,” she avers. “But still!”

They called the gallery Reko-Muse. The place: Olympia, Washington. “It really was a ‘build it and they will come’ kind of a scene. Everyone I knew was playing in a band, starting a gallery, putting out zines, precisely because there was nothing to do otherwise, culturally speaking. And people would drive from Seattle -- or further, even -- to come to shows. Olympia’s music scene became a really big deal.”

Carland, who was also in bands, ran a record label, and put out more than a few zines herself, is today a rock star in another realm: photography.


Posted on Monday, September 29, 2014 by Rachel Walther

Gaby Brink (BFA Graphic Design 1995) and her wife and business partner, Nathalie Destandau, started Tomorrow Partners in 2007 in West Berkeley.

Brink’s vision to partner her expertise in design with companies and organizations that are seeking sustainable solutions for projects that will benefit communities, locally or globally, has come to fruition.

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I knew from a very early age that I was a creative person. There were no artists in my family; my father was a pilot and all of our family was in the airline industry. I didn’t think that art could be a career, but my parents were really supportive.

When in Doubt, Go to CCA

I decided to leave Switzerland and go to the U.S. to learn English and spend a year at an art school. I liked the CCA catalogue best. I moved to Oakland in 1988, and within my first year I discovered photography and decided to stay.

I experimented a lot (this was predigital) and became good at the craft of studio work. Four teachers still stand out for me: Larry Sultan was a big influence -- a great mentor and a really inspiring person!

Posted on Thursday, September 11, 2014 by Emily Holmes

Adrienne Skye Roberts’ (MA Visual and Critical Studies 2009) installation titled It Is Our Duty to Fight, It Is Our Duty to Win / We Must Love Each Other and Protect Each Other / We Have Nothing to Loose But Our Chains (2013), shown at San Francisco’s Root Division gallery, depicted the following words on a sign that rested against a white wall:

“To be treated like everybody else.”

Hand painted in simple black lettering on a white picketing sign, it is easy to imagine these words chanted with pride, determination, and defiance during a political march.

Listen to a recorded audio of the chant »

Five other similar signs featured different statements and demands, such as “The hope to see my children again.” The people who spoke these words did not always have the freedom to practice the civil right of protesting.

In fact, the work reflects the answers of previously incarcerated women whom Roberts asked, “How did you survive prison?” “What do you need to survive now that you are out?” “And what does a world without mass incarceration look like?”

Visit the artist's website »

Posted on Thursday, August 21, 2014 by Laura Braun

What does “The Invisible Hand” mean to you?

For Leigh Markopoulos, chair of CCA’s Graduate Program in Curatorial Practice, and alumna Xiaoyu Weng (MA Curatorial Practice 2009), who were invited to participate in the 2nd Central Academy of Fine Arts Museum (CAFAM) Biennale in Beijing in February, it meant, above all, opportunity.

About the CAFAM Biennale

The CAFAM Biennale is an international tour de force that, in this second edition, put the focus on curatorial education. As curatorial practice becomes more recognized in China, CAFAM officials took the opportunity to showcase the ways in which other schools teach curation as a discipline.

“This biennial was an enlightened attempt to bring international and national art to Beijing and to allow students to participate not only through lessons, but as interns, et cetera, in the event’s organization,” explained Markopoulos.

Posted on Sunday, August 17, 2014 by Dustin N. Smith

Emma Ulen-Klees (BFA Printmaking), Progression, 2014View slideshow 

California College of the Arts alumna Emma Ulen-Klees (BFA Printmaking 2014) was awarded a 2014 Hamaguchi Emerging Artist Residency at Kala.

The artist in residence at Kala Art Institute is funded by the Hamaguchi Endowment for the advancement of printmaking at CCA and by the Kala Art Institute.

The award represents a rich collaboration between the two institutions that creates a special opportunity for a recent BFA Printmaking graduate to work in the dynamic Kala facilities with a community of artists from all over the world.

While studying printmaking and visual studies at CCA, Ulen-Klees began to develop a conceptual body of work inspired by the juxtaposition of natural and urban landscapes and uses the multiple to further explore human relationships to ecology within their manufactured environments.


Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 by Jim Norrena

Matt Pearson at the Get Together event he organized to celebrate neighborhood talent in the Bernal Heights business community.

Graduate Design student Matt Pearson is consulting with Townsquared, a tech startup that provides an online network for local business communities.

The company's goal is to empower local businesses by making it easier for them to communicate and collaborate with one another.

Deepen Relationships

"I am the founding events coordinator for the company," Pearson explains. "I'm running an events pilot that culminates in eight community events in September and August.

"The goal of the pilot is to discover how live events deepen relationships and instigate collaboration within business communities.

Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 by Jim Norrena

Turner Duckworth is an award-winning visual identity and packaging design agency

"The time I spent at Turner Duckworth as a junior designer has been brief, but full of valuable lessons," recalls Graphic Design student Suwanna Ruayrinsaowarot. "The experience has been enriching and insightful in many different aspect of life."

Inside Scoop

Ruayrinsaowarot gained useful experience in her role as a junior designer at the award-winning visual identity and packaging design agency's San Francisco studio. She worked within a team of creatives, which allowed her to achieve various hands-on experiences from creating professional mockups to packaging designs.

"The company culture at Turner Duckworth is a strong, unique, and friendly one. It offers a book club, Tuesday jogging sessions, and staff birthday celebrations. The staff is friendly, funny --  most members are in their mid-20s and mid-30s. Yet they are experienced and professional."

She adds: "They have all been a great source of inspiration for me. I am motivated to discover what I want to do in this field in the future."

Posted on Tuesday, July 1, 2014 by Jim Norrena

Cheryl Dunye and Kingston Farady discuss BLACK IS BLUE

Cheryl Dunye, previous Film faculty and current graduate advisor, earned the audience award for Best Short Film for Black Is Blue (2014) at this year's San Francisco International LGBT Film Festival (produced by Frameline), which ran from June 19 to 29.

Posted on Monday, June 30, 2014 by Simon Hodgson

Photo: Zack DeZon

How does an engineer reinvent himself? One possible answer: at art school.

In 1996, just a year after graduating from Johns Hopkins University with a degree in civil engineering, Bruce King-Shey felt lost.

A lifelong musician, he switched tracks from engineering to take an entry-level job at the Annapolis Symphony. But when his career in arts management began to feel stalled, he wasn’t sure where he should turn next.

Today King-Shey (Industrial Design 2004, MA Visual Criticism 2005) is vice president of design innovation at food and beverage giant PepsiCo.

His circuitous career path offers much insight into how an arts education can unlock hidden talents.

Posted on Thursday, May 8, 2014 by Rachel Walther

Jen Banta Yoshida interviews Nancy Hom for her Bernice Bing documentary

Jen Banta Yoshida (MA Visual and Critical Studies 2009) is many things: an activist, a writer, an artist, a San Francisco native. For the past seven years, she has been delving into the biography of the artist Bernice Bing.

Her intensive research culminated in The Worlds of Bernice Bing, a documentary film released in late 2013. (Watch the trailer »)

The film will screen next at the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento on June 26, 2014 , followed by a Q&A with Jen Banta Yoshida and Lenore Chinn.

Bing was also a San Francisco native. She was born in 1936 in Chinatown and worked in the city for most of her life, as a painter and an activist for community-based arts.