Diversity News

Posted on Tuesday, July 1, 2014 by Jim Norrena

Cheryl Dunye, previous Film faculty and current graduate advisor, earned the audience award for Best Short Film for Black Is Blue (2014) at this year's San Francisco International LGBT Film Festival (produced by Frameline), which ran from June 19 to 29.

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Posted on Monday, June 30, 2014 by Simon Hodgson

Photo: Zack DeZon

How does an engineer reinvent himself? One possible answer: at art school.

In 1996, just a year after graduating from Johns Hopkins University with a degree in civil engineering, Bruce King-Shey felt lost.

A lifelong musician, he switched tracks from engineering to take an entry-level job at the Annapolis Symphony. But when his career in arts management began to feel stalled, he wasn’t sure where he should turn next.

Today King-Shey (Industrial Design 2004, MA Visual Criticism 2005) is vice president of design innovation at food and beverage giant PepsiCo.

His circuitous career path offers much insight into how an arts education can unlock hidden talents.

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Posted on Thursday, May 8, 2014 by Rachel Walther

Jen Banta Yoshida interviews Nancy Hom for her Bernice Bing documentary

Jen Banta Yoshida (MA Visual and Critical Studies 2009) is many things: an activist, a writer, an artist, a San Francisco native. For the past seven years, she has been delving into the biography of the artist Bernice Bing.

Her intensive research culminated in The Worlds of Bernice Bing, a documentary film released in late 2013. (Watch the trailer »)

The film will screen next at the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento on June 26, 2014 , followed by a Q&A with Jen Banta Yoshida and Lenore Chinn.

Bing was also a San Francisco native. She was born in 1936 in Chinatown and worked in the city for most of her life, as a painter and an activist for community-based arts.

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Posted on Tuesday, April 22, 2014 by Zachary Royer Scholz

Curated by Joyce Grimm (MA Curatorial Practice 2006), the exhibition Thresholds of Faith: Four Entries Into the Beyond at San Francisco’s Manresa Gallery features four artists of different faith backgrounds who are all affiliated with CCA.

The artists -- Lynn Marie Kirby (Film faculty), Taraneh Hemami (MFA 1991, now Diversity Studies faculty), Ali Naschke-Messing (MFA 2007), and Cara Levine (MFA 2012, now Sculpture faculty) -- have each produced evocative individual projects that invite reflection on religious practice and experience within contemporary life.

Housed within the active Catholic parish of San Francisco’s Saint Ignatius Church, Manresa Gallery is a unique project (and a surprising one, to many) that allows local and international contemporary artists to directly explore intersections between art and religion.

The resulting exhibitions expand the boundaries of both spiritual and artistic endeavor, and aim to generate far-reaching dialogue within a broad and diverse community.

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Posted on Monday, March 3, 2014 by Deborah Valoma

Mariano Sosa Martinez and Rafaela Ruiz Guetierrez demonstrate at the Textile Futures public demonstration at the University of California, Berkeley Art Museum. Photo by Sita Bhaumik

CCA's Textiles Program hosted two respected members of the artist collective Centro de Arte Textil Zapoteco Bii Dauu -- Mariano Sosa Martinez and Rafaela Ruiz Gutierrez -- for its 2014 biennial event, Textile Futures 2014: Conversations Around the Dye Pot.

Textiles Futures promotes cross-cultural and cross-generational dialog geared toward locating and expanding the rhetoric around textile sensibilities and practices.

This year the CCA Textiles Program collaborated with artist and curator David Wilson with his ongoing project The Possible at the University of California, Berkeley Art Museum.

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Posted on Wednesday, February 26, 2014 by Allison Byers

Team members Kristina Kotlier (MArch 2013) (left) and Raine Paulson Andrews (MArch 2014) (right) with a STAND UP supporter

In spring 2013, three CCA students came together with one common goal: to make a difference with an IMPACT Social Entrepreneurship Award from CCA’s Center for Art and Public Life.

Robert Gomez (MFA and MA Visual and Critical Studies 2013), Raine Paulson Andrews (MArch 2014), and Kristina Kotlier (MArch 2013) were indeed one of three teams who won the award for summer 2013, and the project they carried out, STAND UP with Jamaica, was a major turning point for all of them.

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Posted on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 by Brenda Tucker

Proposed redesign captured attention of Ticketmaster design team!

Matthew Lew’s love of music has turned him into a bit of a design rock star.

In fall 2013, the CCA student (Graphic Design 2015) received a Typography 3 assignment from faculty member David Asari. Lew’s project, a total redesign of the iconic Ticketmaster ticket, got him ink in two leading magazines, Fast Company and Wired, and attention from business leaders and numerous designers, from Facebook to Dropbox, TicPic, Eventbrite, and yes, Jared Smith, the North American president of Ticketmaster.

Lew chose to reconsider Ticketmaster tickets because of his love of concerts. “The design is as old as the cassette tape; they are difficult to read and visually do not give any justice to the experience of live entertainment. It’s the only major ticket service that still prints tickets, and it lacks suitable anti-counterfeiting measures.”

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Posted on Monday, February 10, 2014 by Rachel Walther

Meet ChuCha Santamaria: dancing siren, disco singer, and larger-than-life alter ego of CCA alumna Sofía Córdova (MFA 2010). Born and raised in Puerto Rico, Córdova has developed an artistic practice spanning sculpture and photography, installation, and video, but it is her music and performances as ChuCha Santamaria that have attracted the most attention.

In 2011, she and her husband, the musician and artist Matthew Kirkland, released their debut album ChuCha Santamaria Y Usted. (It was the central piece in an installation/performance cycle.) Reviewers were dazzled. “Fantastic, vital . . . imminently catchy,” wrote East Bay Express critic Ellen Cushing. “Singer/wordsmith Sofía Córdova sings in inglés, español, y Vocoder, carefully unfolding her melodies with stately restraint,” enthused PopMatters reviewer Josh Langhoff.

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Posted on Wednesday, February 5, 2014 by Jim Norrena

(l-r) Pratibha Parmar, Alice Walker, and Geena Davis [photo: Jim Norrena]

Pratibha Parmar is a British filmmaker, director, producer, and writer who is known internationally for her political and often controversial documentary film work. She’s also a stalwart activist within the global feminism and lesbian rights movements.

In short, her accomplishments and commitment to making art that matters makes her an ideal visiting artist (MFA in Film) here at California College of the Arts.

Before she was born, Parmar’s family emigrated from India to East Africa, and then later immigrated to London, where she was raised and went on to study at Bradford and Birmingham Universities where she earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees, respectively.

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Posted on Friday, January 24, 2014 by Jim Norrena

(inset l-r) Emi Watanabe, Kyaligaba Frank, and Andrew Maxwell-Parish

California College of the Arts Hybrid Lab manager Andrew Maxwell-Parish spent his holiday break far away from the college, helping a community he’d never met before. 

After crowd-sourcing funds from friends and family in order to travel to Kampala, Uganda, he and his "instructables" colleague Emi Watanabe flew half-way around the globe to meet Paola de Cecco, who is in charge of the 3D printers owned by local Kampala-based nonprofit, Village Energy. 

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