Diversity News

Posted on Tuesday, October 8, 2013 by Chris Bliss

José Montoya in 2001 (Photo: Dick Schmidt / The Sacramento Bee)

He was one of the most influential and inspirational figures in California Latino history. The poet, artist, and activist José Montoya died on September 25, 2013, at age 81, in his midtown Sacramento home.

He earned his teaching credential at CCA in 1962. Montoya was an important Latino leader, not only among the artists and activists of the 1960s and 1970s, but among innumerable artists of subsequent generations as well.

Read the rest

Posted on Wednesday, September 18, 2013 by Matthew Harrison Tedford

Before helping to bring to life the metal band Dethklok in Metalocalypse or dreaming up the whimsical postapocalyptic Land of Ooo for Adventure Time (both Cartoon Network shows), animator Ako Castuera (Illustration 2000) was, perhaps surprisingly, a ceramics student.

Before coming to CCA, drawing really hadn't been her thing. She attended an arts high school and loved it, but thought drawing class was just too much like boot camp.

Read the rest

Posted on Friday, August 30, 2013 by Chris Bliss

Neeraj Bhatia is a new Architecture faculty memberView slideshow 

New Tenure-Track Faculty

Joining the Visual Studies Program is Makeda Best, who comes to CCA from the University of Vermont. Her research focuses on the history of photography, with an emphasis on the nineteenth century.

Neeraj Bhatia is teaching in the Architecture Program. His work looks at the intersection of politics, infrastructure, and urbanism, and he has previously taught at Rice University, Cornell University, the University of Toronto, and the University of Waterloo.

The Interaction Design Program welcomes Haakon Faste, who has worked for 15 years in the fields of visual art, interaction design, and virtual reality. Most recently he was on the faculty of the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University.

Visiting Faculty

Chris Treggiari is this year’s scholar in residence at the Center for Art and Public Life. Much of his work involves collaborations, often with local nonprofits, often with mobile stages that he brings to public events.

Read the rest

Posted on Thursday, August 29, 2013 by Minnie Phan

Minnie Phan with work presented at her Junior Review

Prior to hearing about CCA, college was not an option in my mind. Aside from financial issues and living in an immigrant household with little experience with higher education, my teenage years were rocky.

I never thought more than two steps ahead when it came to my future. I struggled throughout my schooling and was consumed with (infamous and debilitating) angst. I spent many nights alone.

The turning point of my life occurred when I began to use my hobby of art as an outlet -- as therapy, even. Having my sketchbooks and journals bear witness to my manic thoughts and wild ideas became something of a ritual. It became a channel for every stupid decision I had made, every jerk who harassed me, every class I failed.

Art and writing became profound parts of my persona, and, thankfully, I found a community and companionship in fellow artists.

Read the rest

Posted on Monday, August 19, 2013 by Allison Byers

Hong began his film career at Chungang University in Korea, before moving to the States where he received his Bachelor’s degree from the California College of Arts and Crafts and his Master’s from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Hong made his official directorial debut at age 35 with “The Day a Pig Fell into a Well” in 1996. That same year he won five awards, including three for best new director.

Visit source »

Read the rest

Posted on Wednesday, August 7, 2013 by Jim Norrena

MFA Program in Writing and Writing and Literature Program chair Aimee Phan, author of The Reeducation of Cherry Truong and We Should Never Meet, was featured today in "Motherload: Adventures in Parenting," a New York Times blog that "covers it all -- homework, sex, child care, eating habits, sports, technology, the work-family balance, and much more."

Her piece, "The Price of Urban Family Living," is a response -- one might say reaction -- to the recently released figures by the Economic Policy Institute that prescribe what income is necessary to live modestly.

Read the rest

Posted on Thursday, August 1, 2013 by Rachel Walther

When you first enter Enlightenment Room (2008), an immersive environment artwork by Jewelry / Metal Arts faculty member Nick Dong, nothing happens. You walk down a short, mirrored corridor in semi-darkness to a gray cushioned seat that faces the entrance.

But the moment you sit down, light begins to fill the space, and thousands of white, oval tiles glisten into view. Ethereal music fills your ears. The light brightens, and the music intensifies. This experience can last a few minutes, or a few hours, depending on how long you remain seated . . . waiting. The moment you stand, the music and lights fade out.

Watch a video of Enlightenment Room

Read the rest

Posted on Thursday, August 1, 2013 by Allison Byers

Contribution by Ishmael Reed, Visiting Scholar at California College of the Arts:

George Zimmerman gives neighborhood watch volunteers a bad name. We don’t go tracking down unarmed teenagers who are trying to get home to watch a basketball game. We keep tabs on suspicious activities and advise our neighbors about the small things that can prevent them from having their homes burglarized and their cell phones from being stolen on the streets.

Visit source »

Read the rest

Posted on Friday, July 26, 2013 by Jim Norrena

MFA Program in Writing visiting scholar Ishmael Reed was recently featured on Speakeasy, the Wall Street Journal arts and entertainment blog.

Reed, author of The Free-Lance Pallbearers and Reckless Eyeballing, uses the recent media storm surrounding the controversial "not guilty" verdict of George Zimmerman (on trial for the shooting death of Trayvon Martin in Florida) to accentuate his own experience participating as part of a neighborhood watch team in the Bay Area.

In February, Reed's article "Neo-Classical Republicanism" was published in the New York Times Opinion Pages.

Read the rest

Posted on Thursday, July 18, 2013 by Allison Byers

"My Country Has No Name"

The work of 28-year-old Nigerian-born artist Toyin Odutola (MFA 2012) may literally be black portraiture with ballpoint pen ink, but speaking figuratively, her work speaks volumes. Addressing issues of identity, race, and nationhood, her art resonates strongly with her audiences.

Read the rest

Pages