Diversity News

Posted on Thursday, August 29, 2013 by Minnie Phan

Minnie Phan with work presented at her Junior Review

Prior to hearing about CCA, college was not an option in my mind. Aside from financial issues and living in an immigrant household with little experience with higher education, my teenage years were rocky.

I never thought more than two steps ahead when it came to my future. I struggled throughout my schooling and was consumed with (infamous and debilitating) angst. I spent many nights alone.

The turning point of my life occurred when I began to use my hobby of art as an outlet -- as therapy, even. Having my sketchbooks and journals bear witness to my manic thoughts and wild ideas became something of a ritual. It became a channel for every stupid decision I had made, every jerk who harassed me, every class I failed.

Art and writing became profound parts of my persona, and, thankfully, I found a community and companionship in fellow artists.

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Posted on Monday, August 19, 2013 by Allison Byers

Hong began his film career at Chungang University in Korea, before moving to the States where he received his Bachelor’s degree from the California College of Arts and Crafts and his Master’s from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Hong made his official directorial debut at age 35 with “The Day a Pig Fell into a Well” in 1996. That same year he won five awards, including three for best new director.

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Posted on Wednesday, August 7, 2013 by Jim Norrena

MFA Program in Writing and Writing and Literature Program chair Aimee Phan, author of The Reeducation of Cherry Truong and We Should Never Meet, was featured today in "Motherload: Adventures in Parenting," a New York Times blog that "covers it all -- homework, sex, child care, eating habits, sports, technology, the work-family balance, and much more."

Her piece, "The Price of Urban Family Living," is a response -- one might say reaction -- to the recently released figures by the Economic Policy Institute that prescribe what income is necessary to live modestly.

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Posted on Thursday, August 1, 2013 by Rachel Walther

When you first enter Enlightenment Room (2008), an immersive environment artwork by Jewelry / Metal Arts faculty member Nick Dong, nothing happens. You walk down a short, mirrored corridor in semi-darkness to a gray cushioned seat that faces the entrance.

But the moment you sit down, light begins to fill the space, and thousands of white, oval tiles glisten into view. Ethereal music fills your ears. The light brightens, and the music intensifies. This experience can last a few minutes, or a few hours, depending on how long you remain seated . . . waiting. The moment you stand, the music and lights fade out.

Watch a video of Enlightenment Room

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Posted on Thursday, August 1, 2013 by Allison Byers

Contribution by Ishmael Reed, Visiting Scholar at California College of the Arts:

George Zimmerman gives neighborhood watch volunteers a bad name. We don’t go tracking down unarmed teenagers who are trying to get home to watch a basketball game. We keep tabs on suspicious activities and advise our neighbors about the small things that can prevent them from having their homes burglarized and their cell phones from being stolen on the streets.

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Posted on Friday, July 26, 2013 by Jim Norrena

MFA Program in Writing visiting scholar Ishmael Reed was recently featured on Speakeasy, the Wall Street Journal arts and entertainment blog.

Reed, author of The Free-Lance Pallbearers and Reckless Eyeballing, uses the recent media storm surrounding the controversial "not guilty" verdict of George Zimmerman (on trial for the shooting death of Trayvon Martin in Florida) to accentuate his own experience participating as part of a neighborhood watch team in the Bay Area.

In February, Reed's article "Neo-Classical Republicanism" was published in the New York Times Opinion Pages.

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Posted on Thursday, July 18, 2013 by Allison Byers

"My Country Has No Name"

The work of 28-year-old Nigerian-born artist Toyin Odutola (MFA 2012) may literally be black portraiture with ballpoint pen ink, but speaking figuratively, her work speaks volumes. Addressing issues of identity, race, and nationhood, her art resonates strongly with her audiences.

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Posted on Wednesday, July 10, 2013 by Jim Norrena

Twerk
Belladonna, 2013
Paperback, 112 pages, $15

LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs (Writing 2008) has her first book of poetry now available: Twerk (Belladonna Press, 2013), which is already on the bestseller list for March and May with its distributor, Small Press Traffic.

MFA Program in Writing faculty member Gloria Frym calls Belladonna "a prestigious press for women writers."

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Posted on Friday, June 21, 2013 by Jim Norrena

A new guest lecture series presented by MFA in Comics!

In celebration of the arrival of the inaugural MFA in Comics class, California College of the Arts will host "Comics in the City," a summer guest speaker series featuring four of the most talented creators in comics today.

Each Friday in July, the speaker series will highlight various aspects of the comics medium -- from independent publishing to the craft of writing the most iconic superheroes.

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Posted on Friday, June 14, 2013 by Jim Norrena

In December 2012, luminary filmmaker Werner Herzog (third from right) taught a Film master class at CCA.

Last fall, on December 4, 2012, the Film Program, in association with CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, brought renowned German film director, producer, screenwriter, actor, and opera director Werner Herzog to California College of the Arts as a featured guest in its Cinema Visionaries lecture series.

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