Faculty News

Posted on Monday, June 15, 2015 by Laura Braun

Last semester, California College of the Arts (CCA) scholar-in-residence Chris Treggiari turned to Potrero Hill to serve as his studio class’s primary subject.   Treggiari directed students in his Making the Invisible Visible course to develop new ways to enliven Starr King Open Space.

Visit source »

Posted on Wednesday, June 10, 2015 by Laura Braun

Besides teaching at the California College of the Arts, Grose does marketing research for the Sustainable Cotton Project. During her talk at the Faire, she gave a background on cotton and went on to discuss what the Project is all about.

Visit source »

Posted on Friday, June 5, 2015 by Laura Braun

Books are powerful mechanisms for encountering and shaping oneself, and for making rapid but lasting connections with strangers. San Francisco-based conceptual artist Josh Greene reminds viewers of this capacity in his solo exhibition Bound to Be Held at the Contemporary Jewish Museum. The gallery holds two intersecting projects: a selection from Greene’s ongoing work Read by Famous, which presents books donated and inscribed by various well-known individuals; and The Library of Particular Significance, a lending library of approximately 1,000 books donated by the public.

Posted on Friday, June 5, 2015 by Laura Braun

Even if you never knew what they were called, you’ve definitely seen an air dancer. They’re those floppy dudes filled with air that flail about worldwide in front of car dealers and other businesses advertising super sales. Though Jeremy Mende isn’t the first artist to explore this ridiculous, iconic capitalist symbol, he’s probably the first to custom-build one, tether it to a pole, and clock the countdown to its demise. As Mende explains, his air dancer named Lucky is inspired by “the idiot-philosopher from Sam Beckett’s 1953 play Waiting for Godot.

Posted on Tuesday, June 2, 2015 by Laura Braun

The very idea of books’ staying power is what drew alum, adjunct professor, and artist Josh Greene (MFA Sculpture 2001) to found Read by Famous. Since 2012, the project has persuaded luminaries in various fields to turn over books from their personal collections in order to raise money for literary-focused nonprofits.

Operating under the tagline “From Their Hands to Yours,” Read by Famous has already racked up an impressive library ranging in books that belonged to everyone from comedian Jimmy Kimmel to actor Bill Paxton to fellow artist and alum Hank Willis Thomas. Greene asks that the books not just be a copy, but rather the copy that the donor actually read.

Posted on Monday, June 1, 2015 by Laura Braun

"We are winning today. Today is going to be a great day. There is breakfast casserole!" Randi Gloss, 24, loaded up a square paper plate with food and swung herself into one of the lilac velour lounge car booths on the train she was riding: the Millennial Train Project, a 10-day journey which carried millennial social entrepreneurs and innovators across the country this week. As the train stopped in cities across the southern United States, the riders conducted individual project research and received mentorship from thought leaders spanning a number of industries.

Posted on Monday, June 1, 2015 by Laura Braun

Bernardi, an installation artist and printmaker, is a professor at the California College of the Arts. Born in Argentina, her work investigating crimes in that country has led her to teach on art and human rights.

Visit source »

Posted on Monday, June 1, 2015 by Laura Braun

Six Plus One: CCA Writers Speak: Faith Adiele (“Meeting Faith”), Dodie Bellamy (“The TV Sutras”), Gloria Frym (“The True Patriot”), Elaine Kahn (“Women In Public”), Kevin Killian, Joseph Lease (“Testify”), and Shanthi Sekaran (“The Prayer Room”)

Of politics, poetry, memoirs and art: A dynamic set of readings by six brilliant writers who teach at California College of the Arts, as well as one CCA alumna. (The Marsh Cabaret)

Visit source »

Posted on Monday, June 1, 2015 by Laura Braun

When most people look at the streets of the Tenderloin district in downtown San Francisco they see drugs, crime, and homelessness. But Michael Swaine sees it differently.

Visit source »

Posted on Monday, June 1, 2015 by Laura Braun

Swaine is an instructor at the California College of the Arts, where he teaches ceramics. However, it isn’t his pottery talents that he is putting to use for the people in San Francisco’sTenderloin District; notoriously gripped with poverty and crime. Instead, for the last 12 years, he’s been using an old-fashioned treadle sewing machine mounted onto an ice cream cart and dedicating the 15th of every month to patching up clothes for whoever wants to use his services—free of charge.

Pages