Faculty News

Posted on Thursday, April 19, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

Tag Toss and Run: 40 Classic Lawn Games
Storey Publishing, 2012
Paperback, 208 pages, $14.95

Adam McCauley (Illustration faculty) illustrates this book by Paul Tukey and Victoria Rowell. Remember those long summer afternoons spent playing Kick the Can, Capture the Flag, and Wiffle Ball? Now, even if you can’t remember the difference between dodgeball and double ball, you can brush up on the rules of your favorite classics (plus learn a few new ones!) and begin some new family traditions with your own kids.

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Posted on Thursday, April 19, 2012 by Lindsey Westbrook

Fashion and Sustainability: Design for Change
Laurence King Publishers, 2012
Paperback, 192 pages, $29.95

Fashion Design faculty Lynda Grose coauthors (together with Kate Fletcher) this book about the potential of sustainability to transform both the fashion system and the innovators who work within it. Sustainability is arguably the defining theme of the 21st century.

The issues in fashion are broad-ranging and include labor abuses, toxic chemicals, and conspicuous consumption, giving rise to an undeniable tension between fashion and sustainability.

The book is organized into three parts. The first is concerned with transforming fashion products across the garment's lifecycle and includes innovation in materials, manufacture, distribution, use and re-use.

The second looks at ideas that are transforming the fashion system at root into something more sustainable, including new business models that reduce material throughput.

The third is concerned with transforming the role of fashion designers and looks to examples where the designer changes from a stylist or creator into a communicator, activist, or facilitator.

As of 2014, the book is available in four languages: English, Spanish, Portuguese and Japanese.

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Posted on Thursday, April 19, 2012 by Mitchell Schwarzer

Mitchell Schwarzer gives his introduction at the CCA faculty retreat

On February 4, 2012, the faculty at California College of the Arts gathered at the college's San Francisco campus for a retreat focused on the state of the arts across our many disciplines. In the morning, 25 short presentations offered insights into challenges and opportunities faced by practitioners and thinkers in recent times. The word aired most frequently was crisis: the crisis of the Great Recession; the crisis of Global Climate Change; the crisis of understanding and working within a discipline in our digital age.

Watch the video of all the presentations (91 minutes), shot and edited by Yoni Klein (Photography 2012)

The economic downturn has produced an economic squeeze within most of our disciplines. Art directors, as Alexis Mahrus remarks, have diminished roles in shaping an illustration. Smaller profit margins reduce the flexibility and time given over to experimentation. Branding and celebrity worship take up a larger slice of the creative pie. Some presenters, like Sue Redding of Industrial Design, see no problem in this conflation of art and business and, furthermore, dispute the notion of a crisis. Yet many presenters feel that the economic crisis is not only real but wielding dangerously asymmetrical impacts. Demand remains strong for high-end craft goods and blue-chip fine art. Some small nonprofits are struggling to survive. To Ignacio Valero of Critical Studies, the priority given over to luxury items can be attributed to the ongoing influence of classical economic policies that privilege individual decision making over collective social and natural needs. Likewise, Sandra Vivanco of Diversity Studies notes that economic inequalities have greatly worsened over the past few years, especially in the developing world. Contemporary society is forging a timeless, spaceless way of conducting business, a race for lucrative and short-term gains that concentrates investment more than ever in the hands of a few.

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Posted on Wednesday, April 18, 2012 by Allison Byers

And now for something completely different: a San Francisco pier that harvests fog and uses its moisture to grow vegetables and raise fish.

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Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2012 by Allison Byers

Anna Wintour was right: Geeks can be chic. Bone up on the startling facts beneath the fashion industry's glitzy facade with our recommended reading list. From illustrated compendiums of emerging ethical designers to erudite theses on design as a catalyst for change, here are 13 volumes worth hoarding.

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Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2012 by Allison Byers

What makes Matt Dick tick? He is a designer other designers admire yet he's escaped any tinge of the diva and is routinely described as "sweet."

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Posted on Friday, April 13, 2012 by Simon Hodgson

Brian Conley, Miniature War in Iraq . . . and Now Afghanistan, 2010

Fine Arts faculty member Brian Conley spent part of his fall 2011 sabbatical in the Middle East assisting in the launch of a new nonprofit organization, Sada (Echo) for Contemporary Iraqi Art. Sada was founded just last year by the Baghdad-born curator and Fulbright fellow Rijin Sahakian, who saw a critical need for support in the creation, presentation, and preservation of contemporary art in Iraq.

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Posted on Thursday, April 12, 2012 by Allison Byers

Chanel barbells, meticulously re-created Prada eau de toilette packaging, a Burberry punching bag and an entire Kate Spade store replicated from scratch - those familiar with the aforementioned sculpture and installations by Bay Area artist Libby Black might be surprised to learn that her approach is far from a cerebral spoof of branding in the modern world. Rather, it hews closely to Black's own upbringing.

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Posted on Tuesday, April 10, 2012 by Allison Byers

In less than two weeks Savannah College of Art and Design will be hosting Design Ethos: Vision Reconsidered 2012 a two-part conference: part conversation, part action. The Ethos Conference delves into what is currently being done in the field of design to take on social problems, while the Do-Ference synthesizes those conversations to create a roadmap for social innovation in the future.

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Posted on Thursday, April 5, 2012 by Allison Byers

WHEN you are a practicing alchemist, as Sasha Duerr is, strangers will often ask you to demonstrate your powers by heating up a caldron in the yard. It’s a living, and Ms. Duerr is usually happy to give it a try. On a recent Monday afternoon, she had arranged to spark up three propane camp stoves and scavenge a few things to boil.

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