Faculty News

Posted on Monday, November 11, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Rise of the DEO: Leadership by Design
New Riders, 2013
Paperback, 216 pages, $34.99

This book by Maria Giudice (Design and MBA in Design Strategy faculty) and Christopher Ireland (Design faculty) explores the intersection of creative talent and business expertise, explaining how and why this unlikely coupling produces leaders most capable of solving our increasingly complex business problems.

The two authors have more than 30 years of collective experience as creative business leaders. They conceive of this effort as a playbook designed to unlock creativity in a traditional executive or teach a creative professional how to become an effective business leader. The book lays out—graphically and through example—how DEOs run their companies and why this approach makes sense now.

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Posted on Monday, November 11, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

4-Headed Woman
Tia Chucha, 2013
Paperback, 80 pages, $14.95

4-Headed Woman by Writing faculty member Opal Palmer Adisa is a journey into and through womanhood, from preadolescence through menopause, and an exploration of women’s relations with one another. The poems employ female domestic imagery to name different types of breads found throughout the world, from coconut to pita. The poems in the second section focus specifically on menses, weaving together biological, folk, and cultural aspects in a humorous tone. The third section, "Graffiti Poem," comprises poems centered around college restrooms, which Adisa sees as a site of communication for students on a wide variety of social-sexual issues.

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Posted on Monday, November 11, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Scrape the Willow Until It Sings
Heyday, 2013
Paperback, 288 pages, $35

Over the last 50 years of diligent study and experimentation, Julia Parker (CCA Honorary Doctorate 2006) has emerged as one of the preeminent Native American basket makers of California. Distinguished Coast Miwok-Kashaya Pomo elder and longtime resident of Yosemite Valley, Parker is a prolific artist, teacher, and storyteller. Her body of work confirms that Native basketry is a thriving, ever-changing art form and a vital component of contemporary cultural production.

Alongside Parker's sensitively photographed work, the basket maker's words are stitched throughout with essays by the artist and scholar Deborah Valoma, chair of CCA’s Textiles Program. Valoma describes the historical and philosophical implications of basketry from a non-Native perspective. Basing her work on rigorous scholarship and a long-term personal relationship between author and artist, Valoma peels back cultural assumptions about Native American basketry to reveal the relevance of Parker’s embodied philosophies of thinking and making in the twenty-first century.

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Posted on Monday, November 11, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Smaller Than Life
Concrete Press, 2013
Hardcover, 80 pages, $57.99

Operating in the hybrid zone between sculpture, craft, miniature making, and conceptual art, Visual Studies faculty member Matteo Bittanti creates seven self-portraits that simultaneously appropriate and reconfigure a peculiar medium: die-cast model cars. This limited-edition book features photographs by the artist Colleen Flaherty and a long conversation between Bittanti and the Bay Area artist Juan Carlos Quintana.

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Posted on Monday, November 11, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

David Hockney: A Bigger Exhibition
Prestel, 2013
Hardcover, 258 pages, $75

This exhibition catalogue, published by Prestel and the de Young Museum, was designed by Graphic Design faculty member Bob Aufuldish. It captures the grand scale and vibrant color of Hockney's work of the 21st century. In the past decade, having returned to England after years on the California coast, Hockney has focused his attention on both landscapes and portraits, all the while maintaining his fascination with digital technology. The resulting work is full of color and light, ranging in dimension from billboard-size to letter-size.

The catalogue features more than 100 full-color works of art from museum collections and Hockney's private studio, including such major new works as The Arrival of Spring in Woldgate Wood, The Bigger Message, and Bigger Yosemite. It also includes multiple-image galleries (spread over gatefolds) of some of his iPad drawings and self-portraits, plus film stills from the artist's "Cubist" movies.

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Posted on Monday, November 11, 2013 by Allison Byers

Uriarte sketching in Gharma, Iraq, in 2009View slideshow 

Maximilian Uriarte (Animation 2013) literally draws from experience to create the virally popular comic strip Terminal Lance. Started in late 2009 and based on Uriarte’s experiences as a Marine in Iraq, Terminal Lance is now published weekly in the Marine Corps Times newspaper and online.

In the Marines for “Art’s Sake”

There are many reasons men and women join the military, but Uriarte’s reasoning at age 19 was quite unique. “As an artist, I felt an intense need to experience the world in order to give a kind of legitimacy to my art. It might sound strange, but ultimately I joined for the sake of my art. I wanted to find the most difficult thing I could imagine.”

Uriarte joined in 2006, with the war in Iraq in full swing. With high scores on his ASVB entrance exam, Uriarte chose to go into the infantry. “My actual MOS ended up being 0351, Infantry Assaultman. I was assigned to 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marines in Hawaii, where I deployed to Iraq twice between 2007 and 2009.”

Art at War

During Uriarte’s second tour, his battalion commander saw his penchant for art and photography and offered him the opportunity to serve as combat artist and photographer. Through this, Uriarte was able to travel all over Iraq, taking photos and sketching the Marines’ daily lives.

“Most of the work I did was official, classified, documentary photojournalism. On a rare occasion, I would embed with a unit and effectively be allowed to capture anything I wanted, photographically or otherwise. This was the most fun, as I was given artistic freedom to sketch and take pictures of basically anything.

Part of my billet was also photographing for use our battalion “Cruise Book” (a yearbook for the deployment), which I designed cover to cover.

“This would ultimately prove to be an important step in my career, as it not only gave me experience I could draw from, but also laid the groundwork for Terminal Lance.”

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Posted on Thursday, November 7, 2013 by Jim Norrena

What do filmmaking luminaries Gus Van Sant, John Waters, Barbara Hammer, and Werner Herzog all have in common?

Sure, each has an extensive career and has been honored with any number of prestigious industry accolades (think Oscars, Emmys, Teddys, Golden Globes, Sundance and Berlin Film Festival audience awards, Screen Actors Guild Awards, GLAAD Media Awards, Career Achievement Awards . . . even a Filmmaker on the Edge award!).

But did you know each of these world-renowned filmmakers has paid a visit to California College of the Arts within the past three years? It's true. And what brought them to the college? Each was invited by the Film Program to teach a master class.

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Posted on Thursday, November 7, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

CCA has launched a new MFA in Film program co-chaired by Rob Epstein and Brook Hinton.

Watch the new MFA in Film video »

The filmmaking landscape today is undergoing constant changes in its modes of production, distribution, and exhibition, and these changes offer an amazing opportunity for creative and agile filmmakers to discover powerful new modes of cinematic expression and supportive infrastructures.

Here we ask Epstein 10 questions about the program and his career:

With HOWL (2010) and Lovelace (2013), you’ve gone from being strictly a documentary filmmaker to also being a feature filmmaker. What is it like to make that transition?

It’s exciting, and something we at Telling Pictures have always wanted to do. It’s possible to get to another kind of truth about the world and the human condition when you’re not tied to representing actual reality. HOWL and Lovelace do talk about historical people and events, though, so the projects still involve “looking back.” They’re just told in the present tense.

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Posted on Monday, November 4, 2013 by Allison Byers

It's difficult to judge a visiting lecturer's enjoyability potential because they are an unknown quantity, which will NOT be the issue next Monday night, November 4th, as some of the most compelling professors teaching here at CCA will come together to present the graduate architecture offerings of the MArch (Masters of Architecture, 2 & 3 year) and MAAD (Masters of Advanced Architectural Design, 1 year, three concentrations) programs.

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Posted on Friday, November 1, 2013 by Allison Byers

Thom FAULDERS speaks on his recent option studios at the California College of the Arts (CCA), the technological proficiency of today’s students, searching for the places where architecture and technology or biotechnology meet, a new “flattening” or evenness of precedent, and much more.

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