Film News

Posted on Thursday, November 7, 2013 by Jim Norrena

What do filmmaking luminaries Gus Van Sant, John Waters, Barbara Hammer, and Werner Herzog all have in common?

Sure, each has an extensive career and has been honored with any number of prestigious industry accolades (think Oscars, Emmys, Teddys, Golden Globes, Sundance and Berlin Film Festival audience awards, Screen Actors Guild Awards, GLAAD Media Awards, Career Achievement Awards . . . even a Filmmaker on the Edge award!).

But did you know each of these world-renowned filmmakers has paid a visit to California College of the Arts within the past three years? It's true. And what brought them to the college? Each was invited by the Film Program to teach a master class.

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Posted on Thursday, November 7, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

CCA has launched a new MFA in Film program co-chaired by Rob Epstein and Brook Hinton.

Watch the new MFA in Film video »

The filmmaking landscape today is undergoing constant changes in its modes of production, distribution, and exhibition, and these changes offer an amazing opportunity for creative and agile filmmakers to discover powerful new modes of cinematic expression and supportive infrastructures.

Here we ask Epstein 10 questions about the program and his career:

With HOWL (2010) and Lovelace (2013), you’ve gone from being strictly a documentary filmmaker to also being a feature filmmaker. What is it like to make that transition?

It’s exciting, and something we at Telling Pictures have always wanted to do. It’s possible to get to another kind of truth about the world and the human condition when you’re not tied to representing actual reality. HOWL and Lovelace do talk about historical people and events, though, so the projects still involve “looking back.” They’re just told in the present tense.

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Posted on Monday, August 19, 2013 by Allison Byers

Hong began his film career at Chungang University in Korea, before moving to the States where he received his Bachelor’s degree from the California College of Arts and Crafts and his Master’s from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Hong made his official directorial debut at age 35 with “The Day a Pig Fell into a Well” in 1996. That same year he won five awards, including three for best new director.

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Posted on Friday, June 14, 2013 by Jim Norrena

In December 2012, luminary filmmaker Werner Herzog (third from right) taught a Film master class at CCA.

Last fall, on December 4, 2012, the Film Program, in association with CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, brought renowned German film director, producer, screenwriter, actor, and opera director Werner Herzog to California College of the Arts as a featured guest in its Cinema Visionaries lecture series.

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Posted on Wednesday, May 29, 2013 by Allison Byers

When we asked the 2013 Tribeca filmmakers what schools they went to, we were not expecting such a diverse crop of responses. While a fair number did not attend film school, NYU was heartily represented. Boston University, Tel Avivi University and the program at University of Florida (now at Wake Forest) all were fairly well represented. Compare this list to the Sundance filmmakers from earlier this year.

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Posted on Tuesday, April 16, 2013 by Allison Byers

I went to Middlebury College (BA) and California College of the Arts (MFA). I started out as a visual artist - a painter, sculptor and multimedia artist - before I started to make films professionally. But, inspired by my father and my grandmother (Marian), who were both avid family archivists, I have been behind the camera creating and filming from a very young age.

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"Three hours of sitting in a chair and kissing my girlfriend seemed like an amusing thing to get paid for," muses Susannah Magers (MA Curatorial Practice 2011), reminiscing about the work-study position that she’ll probably always remember as one of the oddest jobs of her career.

Between 2007 and 2012, Magers and dozens of other CCA undergrad and grad students got paid by the college to serve as interpreters of artworks by the contemporary art phenom Tino Sehgal. The Sehgal artworks were presented one at a time, continuously over those six years, at the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, in conjunction with its regular exhibition programming. The participating students all had to audition, and then, if selected, went through a rigorous training and worked many hours a week for the 12-week duration of the piece.

Often the works called for interactions with gallery visitors that were deliberately disjunctive -- somewhere between pranksterism and institutional critique -- and surprising to many attendees, who showed up expecting a nice, sedate gallery experience rather than some kind of live intervention.

For some of the students it was a thrilling brush with fame in the form of an international art star. For others it was just another (albeit pretty out-there) work-study gig. A few finished their first day in tears. And many came away from the experience with their own artistic or curatorial practice forever changed.

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Posted on Tuesday, April 2, 2013 by Jim Norrena

Rob Fatal's "La Bamba 2" premieres April 13 at the Victoria Theatre

Fewer than six months ago we reported alumnus Rob Fatal (MFA 2012) had completed his first feature film, La Bamba 2: Hell Is a Drag, which came to fruition as his Graduate Program in Fine Arts thesis. (Look for the CCA all-star crew listed in the credits!)

Fatal was awarded a $5,000 grant from the Berkeley FILM Foundation, which was instrumental in finishing post-production on the film.

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Posted on Monday, February 4, 2013 by Jim Norrena

The Tribeca Film Institute Filmmaker Programming Team has chosen CCA faculty member Cheryl Dunye as one of 10 finalists for its newest initiative -- the Heineken Affinity Award.

Dunye, a native of Liberia, has directed such feature films as My Baby's Daddy (Miramax), Stranger Inside (HBO Films), and The Watermelon Woman, which was awarded the Teddy Award at the Berlin International Film Festival in 1996.

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Posted on Thursday, January 31, 2013 by Allison Byers

Such was the controversial life of Linda Boreman, AKA Linda Lovelace, the acceptable face of 70s porno chic, that the most recent frontrunner for the role was another troubled alliterative star, Lindsay Lohan. To the uninitiated, Lovelace became briefly notorious as the star of the 1972 breakout adult movie Deep Throat, in which she played a woman whose clitoris, for reasons never really explained by her bubble-blowing "doctor", was located near her larynx, meaning that the only sexual pleasure she could get was from practising a very advanced form of fellatio.

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