Fine Arts News

Posted on Monday, July 7, 2014 by Rachel Walther

Emily Eifler (MFA 2011) has little time for sleep. She writes, directs, edits, and stars in her own YouTube channel, works full-time for a software research lab, and is a freelance columnist for KQED. Every aspect of her life has a common thread: her lifelong fascination with technology and culture.

On her YouTube channel, Blink Pop Shift, she posts new videos weekly on topics pertaining to her enthusiasms -- the history of search engines, say, or GIF artists -- in a way that’s funny and accessible.

“I was really interested in the possibilities of YouTube -- what you could do with good writing and ideas,” she says of her original inspiration for the series. “I started thinking about my personal relationship to technology, and my first videos were based on that. Literacy today is more than reading text. It’s reading interfaces and functionality as well.

“Discussing the history of technology gives people context for what we think of as the ‘digital revolution.’ To describe it as a singular event is an inaccurate representation of all the work that’s been done to get us to this point.”

The channel currently has more than 4,500 subscribers. Eifler is committed to keeping it online rather than migrating to some other format. “Putting my videos on TV would be a terrible idea. This channel is meant for YouTube, and I want it to be a really great web channel, not a stepping stone to old media. There are some cool collaborations in the pipeline, and some funded projects that I’m very excited about.”

Posted on Thursday, June 26, 2014 by Laura Braun

Another rare account of LGBT life in the U.S. during the war was captured in Tina Takemoto's documentary, Looking for Jiro , Graves noted. The documentary unearths the story of Jiro Onuma, a gay Japanese man who was incarcerated in central Utah during World War II. Takemoto is an artist and associate professor at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco.

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Posted on Monday, June 23, 2014 by Laura Braun

After he was diagnosed with cancer at age 14, he was homeschooled by his mother and spent hours drawing, painting and doing ceramics. After completing a bachelor's in fine arts at California College of the Arts he left for Hawaii to build his first tree house, using hand tools and material found on the beaches and forests. When he came back to San Francisco to do a show of his paintings at Needles & Pens store, he made another tree house using recycled urban stuff and lived there for a month.

Posted on Wednesday, June 18, 2014 by Lindsey Westbrook

Star 82 Review 2.1 and 2.2
CreateSpace, 2014
Paperback and online, $11.95
Issue 2.1 print / online
Issue 2.2 print
/ online

Star 82 Review is an art and literature magazine founded and edited by Printmaking faculty member Alisa Golden. Out now: issues 2.1 and 2.2!

“We’ve got color in the spring for issue 2.1, featuring a new poem by the wonderful Joanne Kyger,  photos by Mary Daniel Hobson that look like tattoos, but aren’t, and graffiti photos and stories and poems that revolve around individuality. Layered and worthy of multiple readings, these pieces deal with contradictions and alternate identities.”

Issue 2.1 features CCA alumnus Jønathan Lyons (MFA Writing 2005), who has created an erasure text from two pages of Frankenstein. 

Of issue 2.2, Golden says: “Like rivers, rocks, and beaches, the pieces in the summer issue 2.2 are about surviving, but also show how we take care of one another, how we often judge too quickly, how we discover compassion and hope: this is an eclectic, colorful mix of writing and art, from poems assembled from gravestones to portraits on toast.”

Issue 2.2 features CCA alumna Bonnie S. Kaplan (MFA 1991).

Posted on Tuesday, June 3, 2014 by Laura Braun

I went to school at California College of the Arts in San Francisco. I got my Bachelor’s in fine arts and majored in Fashion Design. My senior project was a fashion show, and I had an entire collection that actually is SCF’s first collection, Foreign Cinema. So, I took my senior collection after we both graduated, we made a blog, worked in my parents’ extra room downstairs, and tried to sell it by word of mouth. From then on it grew into our careers.

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Posted on Thursday, May 22, 2014 by Laura Braun

It can be overwhelming to walk through an MFA exhibition (much less try and write about it). This year’s MFA show at the California College of the Arts was no exception.

Andrea Roberts’s text-based installation piece “Helpful Things,” mirrored the sensation I had of walking down the main hall. The work consisted of a stack of printed signs, the kind you see people using to advertise sample sales or corporate events. The cramped wording and choppy language reminded me of the e snippets of visual dialogue that jumped out at me, but were quickly interrupted by something else.

Posted on Tuesday, May 20, 2014 by Laura Braun

This year I finally made it to California College of the Arts’ (CCA) MFA Thesis Exhibition. CCA has one of the best graduate art programs in the Bay Area, and I was eager to see the work coming out of its studios. While the walls in the school always have work from various class projects on display, the thesis show was jam-packed with art, taking up a large part of the huge 1111 Eighth Street building.

Posted on Tuesday, April 22, 2014 by Zachary Royer Scholz

Curated by Joyce Grimm (MA Curatorial Practice 2006), the exhibition Thresholds of Faith: Four Entries Into the Beyond at San Francisco’s Manresa Gallery features four artists of different faith backgrounds who are all affiliated with CCA.

The artists -- Lynn Marie Kirby (Film faculty), Taraneh Hemami (MFA 1991, now Diversity Studies faculty), Ali Naschke-Messing (MFA 2007), and Cara Levine (MFA 2012, now Sculpture faculty) -- have each produced evocative individual projects that invite reflection on religious practice and experience within contemporary life.

Housed within the active Catholic parish of San Francisco’s Saint Ignatius Church, Manresa Gallery is a unique project (and a surprising one, to many) that allows local and international contemporary artists to directly explore intersections between art and religion.

The resulting exhibitions expand the boundaries of both spiritual and artistic endeavor, and aim to generate far-reaching dialogue within a broad and diverse community.

Posted on Friday, April 18, 2014 by Laura Braun

LF: Hi Lorien! Give Live FAST an introduction to yourself.

LS: Hey! I was born in the little town of Ojai, California. I went to California College of the Arts, in Oakland, for my BFA. I work in a wide variety of mediums, including egg batiking, wood turning, ceramics, screen printing, painting, and paper mache. Currently I live in the Mojave Desert and I love stars, watermelons, and whales, among other things.

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Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2014 by Laura Braun

California College of the Arts presents the

2014 MFA THESIS EXHIBITION

May 15–24, 2014

San Francisco, Calif., April 15, 2014 -- California College of the Arts will present its 2014 MFA Thesis Exhibition from Thursday, May 15, through Saturday, May 24, at its San Francisco campus (1111 Eighth Street; open daily, 10 a.m.–7:30 p.m.). There will be an opening reception on Thursday, May 15, from 6–10 p.m. and a special “Stage and Screen” event (featuring works in video and performance) on Saturday, May 24, from 5–7 p.m. The exhibition and accompanying events are all free and open to the public.

The exhibition features works by the 50 MFA students in the graduating class of CCA’s Graduate Program in Fine Arts. It is curated by the writer, critic, and CCA faculty member Glen Helfand. “This year,” Helfand observes, “many of the featured works center on the transforming landscapes of social and technological interaction. In diverse mediums, they are reflections on living with various aspects of overstimulation, social media/mediation, and rapid economic fluctuations.”

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