Fine Arts News

Posted on Wednesday, April 9, 2014 by Laura Braun

"To me, this is almost like a film strip, a sequence of images," says the artist, Kota Ezawa, 44, who is on the faculty of the California College of the Arts. Ezawa is known internationally for his animated videos, but this is not one of them.

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Posted on Wednesday, April 9, 2014 by Laura Braun

It is in academia, perhaps, that the art of social practice has gained the most traction. In 2005, the California College of the Arts (CCA) began offering social practice as a concentration within its M.F.A. program and soon put it in the curriculum. Since then, similar programs have launched at Queens College in New York, Portland State University in Oregon, the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, and Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles. Ted Purves, who founded the program at CCA, explains that these courses emerged out of pedagogical necessity.

Posted on Wednesday, April 9, 2014 by Laura Braun

David Maisel was born in New York City in 1961. He received his BA from Princeton University, and his MFA from California College of the Arts. His photographs, multi-media projects, and public installations have been exhibited internationally, and are included in many public collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Victoria & Albert Museum; the National Gallery of Art; the J.

Posted on Friday, March 28, 2014 by Laura Braun

"There is so much tension in loving someone who is in the process of changing, who will inevitably die because of this disease," says Banker White, 40, Pam's eldest son, a documentary filmmaker who starting rolling his camera right after she was diagnosed.

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Posted on Wednesday, March 19, 2014 by Rachel Walther

Rivkah Beth Medow (MFA 2003) had become a master at juggling freelance work and personal projects, but motherhood threw her for a loop. Lately, she reports, she’s putting the brakes on working for money and giving more priority to personal projects involving her family.

“I figure, I can always make money, but I don’t have a lot of time to hang out with my kids. I’m committed to creating interesting ways to integrate them into my work.” Her artist-mother role models include Ruth Asawa, whose kids helped bend wire for her sculptures.

One priority project is a photography series featuring the people closest to her. Partly staged and partly candid, the pictures explore relationships, mystery, joy, and tensions within families and friendships. “My portraits function as single-frame documentaries suggesting rich backstories and curious futures.”

 

Posted on Wednesday, March 5, 2014 by Laura Braun

“Did you know a ballpoint pen could do that? Did you know that someone could have the patience, discipline, and skill
 to do that?” asks artist Hank Willis Thomas, who met Odutola after a 2010 lecture he gave at the California College of the Arts, where she was then in her first year as a graduate student. “She asked me to do a studio visit. I’d done 20 in two days, so I was like, ‘Heck no!’ But I don’t like saying no, so I stopped by her studio, wrote my info on the wall, and did my best 
to make it up to her.”

Posted on Monday, March 3, 2014 by Deborah Valoma

Mariano Sosa Martinez and Rafaela Ruiz Guetierrez demonstrate at the Textile Futures public demonstration at the University of California, Berkeley Art Museum. Photo by Sita Bhaumik

CCA's Textiles Program hosted two respected members of the artist collective Centro de Arte Textil Zapoteco Bii Dauu -- Mariano Sosa Martinez and Rafaela Ruiz Gutierrez -- for its 2014 biennial event, Textile Futures 2014: Conversations Around the Dye Pot.

Textiles Futures promotes cross-cultural and cross-generational dialog geared toward locating and expanding the rhetoric around textile sensibilities and practices.

This year the CCA Textiles Program collaborated with artist and curator David Wilson with his ongoing project The Possible at the University of California, Berkeley Art Museum.

Posted on Thursday, February 27, 2014 by Laura Braun

3D printing might be an obvious method for fashion designers to embrace, but technologies from all different fields are inspiring designers to rethink the way they see and do things. Take Sensoree's Mood Sweater — it uses sensors to detect a certain kind of sweat in the palms of your hands that varies depending on your emotional state, and then translates it into multicolored light emitted by LEDs. Kristin Neidlinger created the sweater for her MFA design research at the California College of the Arts, but mainly as a practical device.

Posted on Wednesday, February 26, 2014 by Allison Byers

Team members Kristina Kotlier (MArch 2013) (left) and Raine Paulson Andrews (MArch 2014) (right) with a STAND UP supporter

In spring 2013, three CCA students came together with one common goal: to make a difference with an IMPACT Social Entrepreneurship Award from CCA’s Center for Art and Public Life.

Robert Gomez (MFA and MA Visual and Critical Studies 2013), Raine Paulson Andrews (MArch 2014), and Kristina Kotlier (MArch 2013) were indeed one of three teams who won the award for summer 2013, and the project they carried out, STAND UP with Jamaica, was a major turning point for all of them.

Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2014 by Simon Hodgson

Filmmaker and CCA alumnus Banker White (MFA 1999) has traveled as far as West Africa in his journey to develop communities and tell stories. But his latest work originated rather closer to home. In his documentary The Genius of Marian, due for theatrical release in April 2014, he follows his mother, Pam, as she deals with the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.

“In 2008, seven years after my grandmother passed away after a battle with Alzheimer’s, my mom, Pam, announced that she was going to write a book about her. Marian Williams Steele was her mother and my grandmother. She was a well-known artist. I painted with her my whole childhood.

“As her only grandkid who identifies as an artist, I knew immediately that I was going to be involved. So I started going back home to Massachusetts twice a year to help my mom with the book and to archive Mana’s paintings.”

But what began as a collaborative mother-son book-writing project evolved into something very different, as Pam herself started to experience signs of dementia, and soon was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. “In 2009, I stayed at my parents’ house for three months, just to figure out what was going on,” says White. “It was clear that both my parents needed help. My mom was delusional and had periods of violence. I realized I needed to move home.”

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