Fine Arts News

Posted on Monday, May 18, 2015 by Laura Braun

Join me for a shambling dance through the fine art departments of UC Berkeley, California College of the Arts, Mills College, the San Francisco Art Institute and San Francisco State University. (Sorry, Stanford, San Jose and Davis, there’s just one of me.)

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Posted on Monday, May 18, 2015 by Laura Braun

For the last two months, Bernal Heights-based artist and California College of the Arts graduate Leah Rosenberg has been painting a small storefront—three walls, a floor, a desk, a chair, and a vase—a different color every day. The whole thing, covered in a single solid hue. It’s out on Irving Street, a block from Outerlands and Trouble Coffee in the Outer Sunset, and Rosenberg decides which colors to use based on what she finds in the neighborhood: an acid yellow fence, the pistachio exterior of the Francis Scott Key Elementary School Auditorium, a light purple crab on Ocean Beach.

Posted on Thursday, May 14, 2015 by Laura Braun

Shalom and Colby, who met while working on their master’s degrees in fine arts at California College of the Arts, planned “Duly Noted” meticulously over the course of a year, visiting the deCordova several times to perfect the route, pacing, and segues. But a degree of uncertainty and room for spontaneity remained.

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Posted on Monday, May 11, 2015 by Laura Braun

He boldly began his full-time art career in middle age after taking a circuitous route to his calling. In the two decades between his completion of a Bachelor of Applied Art degree from California College of the Arts (now California College of the Arts) in 1953 and finishing his graduate work at the San Francisco Art Institute in 1974, he followed a winding path through military service, marriage, fatherhood, insurance sales, carpentry, and extensive world travel in Asia and East Africa as a safari guide and importer of artifacts. 

Posted on Wednesday, May 6, 2015 by Laura Kenney

Haisu Tian, "Blood Land Line" (inline skates, Xuan paper, ink), 2015

San Francisco, Calif., May 5, 2015 -- California College of the Arts will present its 2015 MFA Thesis Exhibition from Thursday, May 14, through Saturday, May 23, at its San Francisco campus (1111 Eighth Street; open daily, 10 a.m.–7 p.m.). There will be an opening reception on Thursday, May 14, 6–10 p.m., and a special “Stage and Screen” event (featuring works in video and performance) on Thursday, May 21, 5–7 p.m. The exhibition and accompanying events are all free and open to the public.

Posted on Wednesday, May 6, 2015 by Laura Kenney

Haisu Tian, "Blood Land Line" (inline skates, Xuan paper, ink), 2015

San Francisco, Calif., May 5, 2015 -- California College of the Arts will present its 2015 MFA Thesis Exhibition from Thursday, May 14, through Saturday, May 23, at its San Francisco campus (1111 Eighth Street; open daily, 10 a.m.–7 p.m.). There will be an opening reception on Thursday, May 14, 6–10 p.m., and a special “Stage and Screen” event (featuring works in video and performance) on Thursday, May 21, 5–7 p.m. The exhibition and accompanying events are all free and open to the public.

Posted on Monday, April 27, 2015 by Laura Braun

Christopher’s background includes a BFA in painting from California College of the Arts and a recent solo exhibition at Little Big Space in Albany, California. Currently based in San Francisco, she describes herself as “an enthusiastic viewer of landscapes who never tires of shifting perspectives.”

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Posted on Monday, April 27, 2015 by Allison Byers

Artist Heather Johnson biked from New Jersey to Joshua Tree and back.

CCA alumna Heather Johnson’s (MFA 2001) artist residency with BoxoHOUSE, one of the newer residency programs in Joshua Tree, California, provided her with a unique opportunity -- an ambitious motorcycle journey and visual art project called In Search of the Frightening and Beautiful -- which has forever changed her life’s trajectory and art practice.

About the BoxoHOUSE Artist Residency

Johnson began the BoxoHOUSE artist residency, conceived and directed by former Judd Foundation deputy director, Bernard Leibov, in 2012. The residency targets artists who work across diverse media and prioritizes those who are exploring issues of site, community, and the environment.

"Heather’s practice is composed primarily of creating very detailed handmade embroideries that resemble highly defined drawings," explains Leibov on the BoxoHOUSE website. "She layers the embroideries so that the base imagery deals with the experience of the project and the upper layers portray mechanical drawings related to the subject matter.

"In the works inspired by this latest project, the under layer consists of a series of topographical and navigation maps that capture the experience of being on the road with its ups and downs and twists and turns. The upper layer is made up of technical drawings of her motorcycle and of its constituent parts.

"Heather considers the bike to be an extension of herself – they are as one when on the road – and the parts to be like her body parts."

Johnson found the project to be a dream opportunity: “In addition to one month of uninterrupted research and art making, this meant a motorcycle journey across the United States and back -- something I’ve dreamed of since the day I learned to keep a 500 pound hunk of metal upright and moving forward on two wheels.”

Backed by a crowdfunding campaign, Johnson spent April, May, and June of 2013 out on the road and at residency in Joshua Tree, developing In Search of the Frightening and Beautiful.”

Posted on Monday, April 27, 2015 by Allison Byers

Artist Heather Johnson biked from New Jersey to Joshua Tree and back.

CCA alumna Heather Johnson’s (MFA 2001) artist residency with BoxoHOUSE, one of the newer residency programs in Joshua Tree, California, provided her with a unique opportunity -- an ambitious motorcycle journey and visual art project called In Search of the Frightening and Beautiful -- which has forever changed her life’s trajectory and art practice.

About the BoxoHOUSE Artist Residency

Johnson began the BoxoHOUSE artist residency, conceived and directed by former Judd Foundation deputy director, Bernard Leibov, in 2012. The residency targets artists who work across diverse media and prioritizes those who are exploring issues of site, community, and the environment.

"Heather’s practice is composed primarily of creating very detailed handmade embroideries that resemble highly defined drawings," explains Leibov on the BoxoHOUSE website. "She layers the embroideries so that the base imagery deals with the experience of the project and the upper layers portray mechanical drawings related to the subject matter.

"In the works inspired by this latest project, the under layer consists of a series of topographical and navigation maps that capture the experience of being on the road with its ups and downs and twists and turns. The upper layer is made up of technical drawings of her motorcycle and of its constituent parts.

"Heather considers the bike to be an extension of herself – they are as one when on the road – and the parts to be like her body parts."

Johnson found the project to be a dream opportunity: “In addition to one month of uninterrupted research and art making, this meant a motorcycle journey across the United States and back -- something I’ve dreamed of since the day I learned to keep a 500 pound hunk of metal upright and moving forward on two wheels.”

Backed by a crowdfunding campaign, Johnson spent April, May, and June of 2013 out on the road and at residency in Joshua Tree, developing In Search of the Frightening and Beautiful.”

Posted on Tuesday, April 21, 2015 by Laura Braun

Haisu is a graduate of the San Francisco Art Institute and is currently studying at the California College of the Arts. She recently became inspired by her favorite sport, ice-skating, and created Landskating. This involves painting landscapes with ink and inline skates, drastically changing the traditional style of ink landscaping.

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