Fine Arts News

Posted on Wednesday, March 20, 2013 by Allison Byers

STEM has been a huge acronym buzz word in education in recent years, standing for the “hard science” pillars of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math, but an initiative led by the Rhode Island School of Design is hoping to turn that into STEAM. Aimed at promoting the national movement of putting arts and design in the STEM education program, STEM to STEAM seems to be picking up momentum with its argument that creativity and flexible thinking are just as important to innovation as science.

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Posted on Friday, March 15, 2013 by Allison Byers

A National Guard facility. A professional boxing venue. A Star Wars shooting location. And now, most recently, a massive online fetish porn factory. The San Francisco Armory has a history befitting its Moorish, lost-in-time exterior. It’s also the backdrop of photographer Elizabeth Moran’s porn-sans-porn photo project, The Armory.

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Posted on Thursday, March 7, 2013 by Allison Byers

For Farewell! (2011), Elizabeth Moran collected, printed, and framed a series of "good bye" emails written and sent employees who had either quit, fired, or laid off from various companies between 2011 and 2008. As she writes on her website, "Though the sending of these email are discouraged, employees view them as their last chance to reach out to thank or disparage those who will remain in the company." This artwork is a powerful documentation of the 2008 financial crisis: these ephemeral, epistolary traces are both tragic and comic, in an Office Space slash Margin Call sort of way.

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Posted on Tuesday, March 5, 2013 by Allison Byers

Wall Street Journal quotes CCA Alum Chris Perez, and features the work of late faculty member Larry Sultan and alum Conrad Ruiz.

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Posted on Monday, March 4, 2013 by Lindsey Westbrook

Barbara Holmes, "feed/rest/nest" (2013)

The work discussed in this story is on view in the exhibition By-Product Becomes Product at Intersection for the Arts (925 Mission Street, San Francisco) through March 30, 2013. There is an artists' talk on Saturday, March 23, at 1 p.m. (free and open to the public).

We all know that formaldehyde is toxic, but you may not know that it's an essential component of the glues that bind together such commonly used construction materials as plywood and particle board. And unlike asbestos, which becomes inhalable and therefore harmful only when disturbed, these composite wood panels actually off-gas formaldehyde all the time.

The artist Christine Lee, who has been a lecturer at CCA for the past several years, was concerned about the effects of formaldehyde gas -- not only on people dwelling in structures made of these materials, but also on the artists who use them, possibly without even knowing they are exposing themselves to harm.

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Posted on Monday, March 4, 2013 by Allison Byers

Some of the East Bay's most intriguing art isn't happening in traditional art galleries or museums.

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Posted on Monday, March 4, 2013 by Allison Byers

CCA Faculty members Kim Anno and Tirza True Latimer took part in the Feminist Art Project panel discussions at the Brooklyn Museum, part of the annual College Art Association conference.

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Posted on Monday, February 11, 2013 by Allison Byers

Like Miss America, Michele Pred's "Miss Conception" also dons a crown and scepter. Yet instead of jewels and gems, the latter's pageant gear is adorned with birth control pills.

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Posted on Wednesday, January 16, 2013 by Allison Byers

When I phoned Bryan Nash Gill last Thursday morning, he was on his way back from a boneyard. The New Hartford, Connecticut-based artist uses the term not in its traditional sense, but instead to describe a good spot for finding downed trees.

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Posted on Tuesday, January 8, 2013 by Allison Byers

The arts and culture publication Artforum may be used to commenting on the world of museums and galleries, but now they find themselves as the work of art itself. In her Artforum Excavation Series, Francesca Pastine carves the magazines to form colorful, sculptural pieces that seem to melt down the wall, fold in on themselves, and form sculptural structures. Using an Xacto blade, the San Francsico-based artist painstakingly carved each page creating what she calls "unsolicited collaborations."

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